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Many have been (and continue to do so) predicting the end of personal computing as we know it today. But it's a bit like global warming - a controversial topic. Windows 8 has been available on the market for a number of months and while sales haven't been as strong as one hoped, it's not the sole reason the PC being in a potential situation. A new article on the Forrester blog really goes into some detail about why such thoughts should stop.

Sure, we're seeing a decline in PC shipment numbers, but Lenovo has reported an increase in sales. OEM partners can't simply blame the software vendor for a drop in numbers, since they also add to the overall experience. Then you have to take into account the advance of the smartphone and other form factors. The birth of the iPad created another category for consumers to invest in. Sure, many don't like Windows 8, but it's not the only reason.

The blog article refers to recent reports published by the firm, including "two thirds of US consumers go online from 2 or more devices," which covers computers in multiple cases. A second is "53 percent of global information workers use 3 or more devices for work" with computers playing a prominent role. Also, computers simply won't die out, but wear out. Machines need to be either upgraded or replaced.

Many consumers can do both at home. Opening up the computer case, or ordering components off the Internet is no longer a daunting task for many. While OEMs still make their buck from laptops and other form factors, the PC market will undoubtedly shift from pre-made builds to custom construction - and much like many other products, consumers have individual needs and requirements.

The replacement cycle of computers is noted to be longer, with a possible 6 years (instead of 4) for home owners to look and replace an old machine. It's well worth reading up the full blog article for a quick insight into why the PC market isn't likely to go anywhere. As for OEMs, it's down to the companies to innovate and offer machines at competitive prices.

What are your thoughts on the PC market?

Source: Forrester; thanks, Stephen, for the tip!