This week, HP announced their new refresh of machines for the business/enterprise user. The company’s current EliteBook Folio has been upgraded, a new version of their EliteBook Revolve has been shown off, and a new mini laptop for schools dubbed the Classmate 10 is the next generation of affordable technology for schools.

HP Elitebook 1050 G1

The new EliteBook Folio 1040 G1 is an update to the company’s current enterprise Ultrabook. The new .63 inch notebook is thinner than its past .74 inch older brother; it has also lost some weight and is down from 3.6 pounds to 3.3 pounds. While a thinner and lighter laptop is nothing to complain about, we really care about what is on the inside.

The unit now features a display up to Full HD (1920 x 1080) and an optional touch screen that can be added on. Under the hood, you will find Intel’s latest generation Core processors and a battery life that is promised to last up to ten hours. The 1040 G1 also features a new type of trackpad, the Forcepad, which uses pressure sensitively instead of typical click buttons. The Folio 9470 will have a starting MSRP of $1,299 USD.

The new Revolve G2, an update to HP’s original Revolve laptop, will continue to be one of older style spin and twist machines that we have been familiar with since Windows XP. New to this model is Intel’s latest Haswell CPUs, an upgraded Stylus, and a blazing fast LTE radio. The Revolve G2 will begin at $1,364 USD (yes we know, it is an odd price).

Lastly, HP has unveiled the latest edition of their Classmate PC, the Classmate 10. It is aimed at educational institutes and runs a Celeron N2000 series CPU. The company hasn’t yet stated how much the unit will cost, but we are going to hope for a low price tag.

 If any of those laptops don’t contain a large enough screen for your taste, you can be sure to grab HP’s new EliteDisplay S230tm monitor. A Full HD 23 inch monitor with anti-glare matte finish that will ship next year and cost $359.

Are you interested in any of HP’s latest business machines?

Source: Engadget