Earlier this year Microsoft was brought into the geo-location controversy along with Android and the iPhone, but remained vigilant that no foul play was present. Earlier this month the software giant was attacked again by a lawsuit claiming the camera app in Windows Phone collected and sent location information without prior permission.

Microsoft denied the claims with a firm statement:

"Because we do not store unique identifiers with any data transmitted to our location service database by the Windows Phone camera or any other application, the data captured and stored on our location database cannot be correlated to a specific device or user. Any transmission of location data by the Windows Phone camera would not enable Microsoft to identify an individual or 'track' his or her movements."

Now Rafael Rivera over at Within Windows has posted his own findings that backs up the lawsuit against Microsoft. He found that packets were being sent by the camera app to Microsoft's Location Interference service. What's being sent? OS version, device information (make, model, etc.), local wireless access points and various GUID-based identifiers. 

However, there are a lot of remaining questions: Is Microsoft collecting this data or just pushing it back? What happens when you disable the location service in the camera? (Ansewr: it appears to stop this behavior). In short, it looks like the first time you run the camera app, it gets your location from Microsoft, but once you disable it, that's that.

Check out his full report via the link below. What do you make of Microsoft collecting location data?

Source: Within Windows