I never thought that as an adult that popping bubbles while doing connect the dots could be so engaging and addictive, but Resco Bubbles has opened my eyes to (and fulfilling) these needs that I didn’t even know existed deep inside me.

As I am sure you have seen on TV, read about here at WMExperts, or discovered in your own WM phone that you have recently purchased, many of the new phones now come with G-Sensor built in. What is that? It is the phone’s ability to detect which way the phone is moved or tilted. And with this new technology, games that take full advantage of it are starting to hit the market as well. We here are WMExperts will continue to highlight and share the best of, and the worst of, this new genre of games.
Resco Bubbles ver 1.20 is the first one of this new genre that we are reviewing here at WMExperts in detail. As I mentioned above, it is addictive, but it is too simple to not be worth the money? Read on to find out if wasted hours of popping bubbles is destined to be a must have for your current or future phone.



The concept of the game is simple. Tilt your G-Sensor capable phone (i.e. Diamond or Touch Pro) to roll the steel ball bearing around to pop all the bubbles as fast as you can. Sound simple enough? The catch is that you have to pop them in the correct order. You add different surfaces, some directional ball energizing bubbles, instant death bubbles, having the numbered bubbles constantly moving, and a few ball bouncing bombs into the mix and it gets a little more interesting.

I have to be honest and say that after playing the first 4 levels, I thought that if it was going to continue on like this, it would soon have that more of the same syndrome with each new level. No sooner than level 5 the game introduced new floor textures. The ball then rolls like you would expect with whatever type of surface that level has. For example, in level 5 you have a short carpet like surface which slows the ball down… actually making it a little easier to pop bubbles laid out in a more complex bubble order. Then you have level 20 with a shiny and extremely smooth brushed metal surface ensuring that only the steadiest of hands will pass.

There are no game overs as you have unlimited tries to complete any given level. If you pop a bubble in the wrong order, the level simply resets itself for you to try again.

As you advance in the 50 levels, you will find other challenges that you have to navigate around. For example, you will light the fuse of any bomb you get too close to. If you are close enough to it when it goes off it will send you bouncing all around the area, hitting any unfortunate bubbles in your path indiscriminately. As you can imagine, any skull and cross bones are good bubbles to avoid if you do not want a fate of instant death. There are also bubbles that have arrows. If you pop one of these, then your ball is going to be super charged with a will of its own to always move in the direction of the arrow on the bubble Or the numbered bubbles that you have to pop in order are moving all around the area and you have chase the next one while avoiding the other moving ones.


Resco Bubbles is simple in concept, but very nicely thought out with continually challenging and engaging levels. As with nearly all Resco products, the graphics are very nice. The physics of the game are nearly perfect of what you would expect if the game was actually in the real world... including having it "feel" like the ball hits the walls with very accurate use of vibration. My only suggestion would be to add some more cool sound effects to items like the bombs or the instant death bubbles. Other than that, I have found myself at times wishing I was not in a car or flying in a plane so I could play that last challenging level without all the extra bumps to throw me off!


  • G-sensor support
  • 50 challenging levels
  • various surfaces
  • G-sensor calibration
  • best score
  • realistic ball-bounce feeling


Ratings (5 out of 5)


4 stars out of 5


  • Nice layout.
  • Realistic physics
  • Good graphics
  • Addictive


  • Cannot easily play while in a moving car, plane, or train
  • Could use some additional sound effects