android vs windows phone

Windows Phone and Android have a lot in common. Both are competing for second place in app revenue against the juggernaut that is Apple, and both types of handsets/tablets are more affordable than iOS devices. Although Android has a leg up over Windows Phone worldwide, Microsoft’s mobile platform has a great opportunity to surpass Android in a number of emerging markets like China and Brazil.

There are many factors at play in the ongoing mobile battle between Microsoft and Google. To get a better idea of how each side stacks up, we spoke with Martin Koppel, COO at mobile payment specialist Fortumo. If Martin’s predictions are correct, Windows Phone’s continued growth in developing markets will soon put it on much more even footing with Google’s mobile OS.

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In a recent interview Google stated they will not devote any resources to making apps for either Windows 8 or Windows Phone 8. They have also now ceased consumer support for ActiveSync.  Some are calling it ‘war’ while others passionately question if Windows Phone can survive without Google products and services.

The relationship between Google and Microsoft has always been somewhat hostile. In many ways the battle they engage in now can be seen as a kind of echo from a distant technological past. Google have dug in their heels and to some degree shown their true colours by declaring zero support for Microsoft’s newest operating systems, Windows Phone and Windows 8.

But does it matter and has anything really changed?

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A few weeks ago, we covered a single case study of one developer who released the same app on Android and Windows Phone: 'Mortal Kombat Tactics' by Neuralnet found here in the Marketplace.

The conclusion at the time was that Windows Phone was a better platform for developers to make money on (via ads) due to the fact that visibility is much higher than the Android Market. As a result, the developer brought in just $1.27 form Android in five days versus the $14.77 for the same time--that's a huge difference obviously.

But, would that advantage last? Luckily, Alex updated his post to show what thirty days in August would look like instead of just five:

  • Android revenue is $3.44 with an eCPM of $0.30 and a total of 11,606 Impressions
  • Windows Phone 7 revenue is $108.55 with an eCPM of $0.94 and a total of 114,920 Impressions.

We don't really need to point out how $3 is slightly less than $108 for Windows Phone, do we? Alex summarizes:

"The 30,000+ apps in the Windows Phone 7 Marketplace and 300,000+ apps in the Android Market are good numbers, but discovery is everything. Which gives a clear advantage to Windows Phone 7.

Once your app is on the "New" or "Just in" category is the best chance that your application can be seen by a lot of people, on Windows Phone 7 your app can be under the "New" category for a full day or two, three if you are lucky, but on Android is another subject all together because you can have 40 plus apps published at the same time yours is and that's your big chance to be seen by a lot of people."

Certainly food for thought for developers looking to pick a platform to work on. Like all things though, as Windows Phone's Marketplace grows, this advantage may dwindle, but as of right now it's looking pretty good.

Source: WP7DesignCorner

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