gestures

In a concept video demonstrating the use of 3D sensing technology, Microsoft shows how 3D sensing would work on a smartphone. With the rumored Microsoft Mobile, formerly Nokia, McLaren smartphone anticipated to have 3D gesture tech to allow a user to interact with the touchscreen without even touching the display, this technology could appear on this or future Windows Phone models. Check out the YouTube video demo after the break to see this innovative and exciting tech in action.

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The Xbox One came out a few days ago, did you get one? If so, by now you’ve started to explore some of the Kinect 2.0 functionality that every Xbox One comes bundled with. It’s fairly incredible despite some initial growing pains. There’s a whole set of both voice commands to learn and gestures if you want to really control your Xbox One like a pro. Here they are.

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Today, leakster Twitter account @evleaks revealed the codenames of two upcoming Nokia Windows Phones, the "Goldfinger" and "Moneypenny." As well as these new smartphones, Nokia is also reported to be working on "3D Touch," utilising hardware sensors to enable you to manipulate things on-screen through gestures. Similar to what you can do already with Nokia Glance

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Gestulator swipes its way to Windows Phone 8

Gestulator is a gesture based calculator app for your Windows Phone. We took a look at the app some time ago and found it to be an interesting, handy calculator app.

Gestulator was recently updated to provide Windows Phone 8 support that also addresses a few stability issues. The Windows Phone 8 support allows the app to be compatible with all screen sizes and overall, the app seems to have a little more zip.  If you're looking for a basic calculator with a speedy interface, Gestulator is worth trying.

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Winner of the Imagine Cup '12 - quadSquad with enable talk

The annual Imagine Cup organized by Microsoft to support student creativity in solving real world problems has just wrapped in Sidney, Australia. As usual, some of the top winners were related to Windows Phone development so we’re going to take a moment to give them their props.

Early glove prototype

First place (Software Design) – quadSqaud (Ukraine) - In what is probably one of the most unique and coolest uses of a Windows Phone so far, quadSquad have created a company called enable talk (enabletalk.com) around their gesture interpretation technology.

In short, the problem for many people who use sign-language is the inability to readily communicate with those who don’t speak the same language (there are many sign-languages out in the world and they all have the full capacity of spoken language). 

quadSquad solve this problem by having users wear special sensory gloves that detect the signing. That data is then sent to the Windows Phone where the software takes over, converting the sign to spoken word—literally. enable talk uses Microsoft’s text-to-speech feature to “say” the whole word once it’s signed, giving signers a way to verbally communicate with those unfamiliar with the language.

Creating software is one thing but the team also made the glove system by hand (pun!) which is no small feat. Then they had to record all the gestures in a computer that can be stored for later recognition. The whole thing fits well within Microsoft’s Kinect strategy and of course helps address a real-world problem too. Awesome.

The Drexel Dragons won for Game Design (phone) with Math Dash

First place (Game Design—phone) – Drexel Dragons (US) - Ah, math. We hated it in school and we still kind of dislike it as adults but who can deny that it’s not critical? Drexel Dragons took on the challenge of making a game that can help students learn math. What better way to do that than make a game called Math Dash?

Math Dash is a Windows Phone game that allows users to complete problems by dragging the answers (in the form of sparkly ‘atoms’) into the equation field. With the correct answer, users get points for the game and yes, another new math problem. A simple progress bar keeps track of you right versus wrong answers, allowing you to jump to the next level or signaling that you lost. In addition, you can drag number atoms on to other orbs to create new numbers, should you not have the right one to choose. Finally there are also power-ups and hazards to keep it interesting and feeling like a game.

The concept behind Imagine Cup is great—it gives students a chance to shine and actually makes the world slightly better; kudos to Microsoft and all the student developers who come together every year for the competition. Each first-place winning team takes home $8, 000 for their effort.

Check the videos of both winners after the break...

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Carbon version 1.2 is now live on the Marketplace after being submitted twelve days prior. We covered what's new in this update previously, which includes video preview (on the timeline) and a new quote screen gesture (tap on a tweet with two fingers). As well as improvements made to the app (speed, performance, etc.), the team has also introduced a trial mode that wasn't present in v1.1 - this trial has limited functionality but sports no advertising.

What else has been patched in version 1.2? Check out the bug fixes and changes below:

  • Read It Later bug that failed to save links to Read It Later service
  • Timeline context menu bug
  • Camera share bug that did not select pictures from Pictures hub
  • Broken image upload
  • List Timelines on Quickline Bug where it didn’t load older Tweets when tapping on “More”
  • Minor changes & bug fixes with Live Tiles
  • Default Image service changed to Twitpic instead of Twitter(to be reverted back soon)
  • Quickline bug that did not load all of the lists
  • General cache, and storage fixes/enhancements
  • Smoother Timeline scrolling experience and faster image fetching

You can download Carbon (and the trial) from the Marketplace for $1.99.

Via: CarbonWP

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It's not really news when Microsoft says they think their technology can take on or beat Android or the iPhone--it's the same PR spin you'd expect from any company that is about to enter some heavy competition. So it's a bit odd that this story is getting so much clout, but he were go...

Microsoft bought TellMe a few years ago (2007), it first showed up on the Samsung Intrepid and will now finally get robust integration with Windows Phone 7, as was recently demonstrated here in video.

Overall it's quite nice, but dare we say in its current form, hardly revolutionary.  In fact, Android's voice control is leaps and bounds beyond what WP7 will be able to do when finally launched e.g. 'Edwin' is pretty ridiculous (see a YouTube demonstration and witness the power of this completely free app). 'Edwin' is so far ahead right now, we're not sure how TellMe is going to catch up, but hey, we're all for a good race.

Recently, TellMe and Windows Phone 7 were demoed and discussed at the SpeechTEK conference. There, MS boasted how TellMe is the largest speech-based natural language processing system in use today. But really, the big news is that Microsoft is planning to really leverage TellMe in Windows Phone 7, expanding its capabilities significantly...over time. For at launch, it will only do some basic things (dial contacts, launch apps and search Bing), but it will go "global" on the phone in the future, allowing widespread control of just about everything.

It's nice to see Microsoft taking voice-control seriously--after all, they did buy a whole company for the tech.

Finally, the last bit of juicy info was talking about Xbox and Kinect, which you can interpret how you want (to us, it sounds like these ideas, remember that rumor?):

"Speech is the core of NUI," he said. Part of the demonstration showed how Microsoft's Kinnect XBox technology could interpret hand gestures to trigger actions on the computer. This technology will be used in Microsoft products beyond the XBox, Bukshteyn said in a subsequent interview with IDG.

Let's hope it means what we think it means.

[via PCWorld]

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