performance

If you are interested in seeing how your Windows Phone's overall performance stacks up to other phones and tablets, you may be interested in Basemark OS II, a cross-platform benchmark tool by Rightware, simultaneously released on iOS, Android and Windows Phone.

Basemark OS II runs a battery of performance tests, including system, memory, graphics, web browsing and camera and then assigns a score based on the results.

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Ever wondered if Microsoft improved the performance in the Windows Phone 7.8 update? It has certainly been considered, but many have naturally assumed that since the company has failed to shout about optimisations present in the latest version of 7.x, that there's little difference between 7.5 and 7.8.

Windows tutorials and resource website 7tutorials has published an in-depth performance comparison between Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 7.8. The plan was to see if there were any signs of performance improvements in the latest software version for first generation hardware. Turns out, there's barely any difference between the two, but we weren't expecting much, right?

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This week the two biggest components of the Windows Phone ecosystem reported financial results.  Microsoft and Nokia both printed decent numbers.

I won’t spend much time on Microsoft.  It was a fairly boring quarter. The Redmond giant came in with results that were in line with analyst results.  They’ve now sold a grand total of 60 million Windows 8 licenses, but this includes licenses sold to Dell and other manufacturers. So it’s hard to pin down exactly how many boxes consumers are actually buying with the latest and greatest Windows OS.

In the land of mobile, Microsoft won’t say how many Surface tablets they’ve sold.  I can’t say I blame them.  If they revealed numbers they’d just be compared to iPad and Samsung Galaxy Tab sales. Why would Microsoft want to give people more reason to print negative headlines?

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So we've seen how the Lumia 920 holds up when attached to the front of a Land Rover, or at live concerts, but what's the quality like when you're (like many) recording while grooving to the beat? We decided to head on down to the Deadmau5 event in Brixton, London last night to see how our Lumia 920s would perform in low light, with high volume levels and an obscene amount of movement.

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While we think Microsoft’s Surface is a solid first attempt, there are some minor issues with the OS and hardware that still need to be worked on. One of those is performance as animations and app load times aren’t always the smoothest nor fastest. Still, being a version 1.0 product we know Microsoft will be tweaking things along the way.

Such is the case with today’s update that has gone out to the Surface RT. The update, part of “patch Tuesday” contains eight parts including a firmware update related to security. Over at the Verge they claim that the update also improves performance of apps starting up: “On average, apps launched around two seconds faster than before, a noticeable improvement.”

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Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger

Good news for those of you who use the official Chase Banking app or AmazingWeather (paid or lite), as both apps received updates today to make ‘em faster.

AmazingWeather gets bumped to version 3.6 and touts that it loads “in less than 1.5 seconds” and is now 3x faster than the previous version. That’s welcomed news as AmazingWeather is a sharp looking app but it was always a bit slow to use when compared to its competition.

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There is plenty to look forward to with the new crop of Windows Phones. For example, with the Nokia Lumia 920 you have the Pureview Camera, the PureMotion screen, and the color choices. You can also add the Snapdragon S4 processor to the list of anticipated features--but you may be wondering what's so great about the S4 (MSM 8960) anyway?

The Snapdragon S4 won't be an exclusive to the Lumia 920. The Lumia 820, HTC 8X, HTC 8S and Samsung ATIV S will also bear Qualcomm's latest SoC. The new processor will benefit all our new Windows Phones across the board.  So what are those new perks?

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Hacked HD2 runs WP7 faster than HD7

The title says it all, folks.  According to a video posted by YouTube user kendimcefg, a HTC HD2, hacked to run WP7, runs many basic functions faster than a HD7 which natively runs it.  We knew that the HD2 was a versatile device, but this is pretty amazing, if accurate.  If seeing is believing, then color us impressed.  Check out the video for yourself, but try not to rock too hard to the soundtrack.

Source: Kendimcefg (YouTube); via: Ali Waqas

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The other day, we mentioned about CNet's experience with the upcoming "NoDo" update, specifically the performance increase when loading locally stored, graphic-intensive apps.

Improvements ranged from a few to 20 seconds for something like Bejewled. Now Anadtech has posted a video basically showing the same thing described by CNet and seeing is believing. While not all apps benefit, clearly the bigger ones like Ilomilo will. Currently, some games do take awhile to load but we're not exactly complaining, so any improvement is icing for us. You?

Source: Anandtech; via: wmpoweruser

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CNET managed to get some more information from Microsoft regarding the upcoming January/February update to Windows Phone 7, described by Ballmer during his keynote. While we know about copy and paste but the other new feature quoted as a "significant improvement in performance when loading or switching between applications" was left a little vague.

Aaron Woodman, director of Microsoft's mobile communications business, went over some of the details with CNET and it turns out to be pretty interesting. In short, front-loading, graphic intensive apps will see the most, maybe even dramatic, improvement, while more text-based apps won't see as much. Basically, things like XBox games and apps with locally stored information will get a huge boost. However, apps like Flixster won't see much of an improvement, only because they pull down their data from the web and that's a different thing altogether.

When given an example like Bejewled, the comparison between an updated and non-updated device was given to CNET. Evidently, the updated device loaded Bejeweled a full 15-20 seconds faster than the non-updated version, which Woodman appropriately called "dramatic". What is nice of course is the fact that developers need not make any changes to their coding--this is all on Microsoft's memory architecture and how it allocates resources, so technically every app will see a gain, just some more than others.

Finally, you can also sense the nervousness of Microsoft regarding app-updates. While there are many "unknowns" about the whole process, the feeling from this and other interviews on the matter is Microsoft doesn't know either: they taking baby steps to make sure it all goes smoothly and they are leaving themselves wiggle room to adjust if needed.

Source: CNET

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