versus

In case you have not heard, the iPhone 6 and its larger cousin the iPhone 6 Plus launched over the weekend. Apple reportedly sold over 10 million of the new phones to consumers, breaking yet another record. Regardless of your opinion of the iPhone, any smartphone that can sell that much in three days sets the bar for the industry.

How does the iPhone 6 stack up against some of the top Windows Phones? It is a valid question, especially if you are in the market for a new phone, considering switching, or a just curious as to where Apple is still leading.

I managed to pick up the iPhone 6 this weekend, like millions of others. In the following video, I give my impressions of the phone as compared to the Lumia 1020, Lumia 1520, and HTC One for Windows (the Lumia 925 and Lumia 930 also appear).

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There's little debate that Nokia has changed the way we look at our Windows Phone cameras. From the PureView technology to optical image stabilization (OIS) to making Zeiss a household name, Nokia has designed a healthy, quality assortment of cameras for their Lumia Windows Phones.

While the weather wasn't exactly agreeable all the time, we took the Nokia Lumia 1020, 925 and 920 out to see how these three cameras compared. All three are solid contenders to satisfy your smartphone photographic needs but is the Lumia 1020 the clear winner? The answer may surprise you.

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We know a lot of you have been itching for some low-light camera samples from the Nokia Lumia 1020, a device that should be landing on your doorsteps as early as today if you pre-ordered from AT&T.

Last night, we hopped into mid-town Manhattan to grab some samples with the 41MP beast and they’re posted below. We also have four samples comparing to the Lumia 920 and Lumia 925, so you can see the differences therein and two video clips as well.

The images have been resized for the web (click to enlarge) but as always, we’ll give you the full resolution ones here on our SkyDrive (link, 149MB ZIP), should you want to pixel peep...

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Today here in New York, Samsung finally pulled the sheet off of the Galaxy S4, their next big flagship Android phone for 2013. Due at the end of April, the phone looks almost exactly like the S3 save a few minor differences, but it’s the guts and software that make this a killer device. It will launch on a massive 327 operators in 155 countries for complete global reach.

We’ll spare you all the details of the S4, though it does feature 2GB of RAM, an eight-core Samsung Exynos 5410 running at 1.8GHz, a triple-core PowerVR SGX 544 graphics chip with a massive 2600mAh battery. Oh yeah, it also has a swanky 5” 1080P Super AMOLED display at 440 PPI and various sensors, including Infrared gesture, temperature and humidity sensors, which while gimmicky is still really neat. Finally, it sports a 13MP rear and 2MP front camera, with some new "innovations" like two-way shot.

We briefly put it up against our Nokia Lumia 920 in a video and while this is far from a controlled “versus” battle, you can at least get an idea of how Samsung’s beast looks against Nokia’s.

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Although Nokia caught some flak for the misleading demonstration of the 920’s camera, we’ve always maintained that optical-image stabilization (OIS) is a very real and proven technology. 

Still, Nokia has some catching up to do to prove to the world just how impressive the 920’s camera can be with OIS on board and as it turns out, the task is simple: just use it.

A Russian site managed to get a meeting with Nokia and to try the 920’s camera in a real-world experiment with the Samsung Galaxy S3. The test? Strap both phones to the top of a remote controlled car, and then drive it all over a bumpy rug.

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Today's winner is...

Today, Apple finally took the wraps off of the long-awaited iPhone 5 (you can get all the dirty details at our sister site iMore). Funny thing happened along the way though to the announcement: many leaks came forward early on that turned out to be highly accurate, taking the punch out of a lot of the new features. What’s more, even the media started to get a bit bored with Apple’s plans for the next-gen device.

The question for our readers though is in terms of raw technology—who came out on top? We say that because we know Apple will win the PR and hype war, but for the first time a Windows Phone has gone toe-to-toe and in terms of specs, has beat out the next-generation iPhone.

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Mock battle: iPhone 5 vs Lumia 920

When the day breaks tomorrow, the tech world will be focused on one thing: Apple. Then it will turn on everything else that is mobile and ask rhetorical questions. Will we be a part of that? Well, we can’t ignore it, can we? For that though, you have our sister site iMore who have had some fairly massive (and accurate) leaks on the upcoming iPhone 5.

But we want to know, will Apple live up to the hype or will Nokia outshine them this time?

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Jay Bennett and Daniel Rubino are joined by George Ponder this week to hash out those two big Windows Phone releases, the HTC Titan II and the Nokia Lumia 900 both on AT&T.  Tune into our discussion of the pros and cons plus other Windows Phone news happening this week.

Full show notes after the break and HD Video as well...

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We like single case studies. You get exceptional detail and that personal touch. We also know you can't extrapolate the result to every similar situation, but they are useful for drawing some conclusions. For example, a few months ago, we wrote about about a Mortal Kombat guide for Windows Phone versus its Android version (Part 1, Part 2), with the former having a higher return in ad-revenue. Now we turn to a case with iOS.

The story is told by Anlock, who specialize in child-learning apps for mobile platforms. They make the same apps for both iOS and Windows Phone except that the iOS version is "more enhanced". They were making only iOS apps but were persuaded to try their hand at Windows Phone--since they had all the content, porting was easy. On both platforms their apps received the same 4 and 5 star reviews and both were even featured at some point in the Marketplace and App Store. The only difference between the two, really, was Anlock tried an "extensive advertising campaign" with iOS (that failed) whereas on WP7, they had no out-of-pocket advertising program. So what was the outcome?

"In terms of ranking, our WP7 app has been number 1 in the US in the Kids + Family category for the past three months in the Marketplace. As for the iPhone app, it has been ranked in the top 400 in Games\Educational for more than 2/3 of the entire time frame, reaching the top 100.

The end result? As said, FIVE time more sales of our WP7 app vs. our iPhone app."

The next question of course is, why the difference?

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Look, we're not going to make a mountain of a mole hill here: we know this video technically doesn't mean much and the developers (the folks behind CarbonWP) also know it's not a real test, but still...it's cool to see.

All it is a push notification sent to both the iPhone and a Windows Phone. Lo and behold, they tie for receiving the message at the same time. Does that make one phone better than the other? Certainly not. But does it make Windows Phone look pretty decent for being able to hold its own against Apple (in this one test)? Sure does. Plus, it makes CarbonWP look pretty sweet too, we suppose.

Anyone else have experiences with the iPhone and Windows Phone receiving notifications? Sound off in comments with your thoughts. Thanks, TechJunky79, for the link!

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We understand some folks on T-Mobile are a little miffed about not getting the Titan and instead have to "settle" for the Radar 4G. We disagree a little bit, having handled the Radar and knowing what a svelte device it is.  We also know that these second generation devices have better internal hardware, a faster CPU, newer more powerful GPU and better screens to name a few differences.

In this case, WP7.com.pl has put the HD7 next to the Radar for a side-by-side speed test. While it should be of no surprise that the Radar wins easily, it's still certainly interesting to see the margin of difference. Needless to say, a lot of us will enjoy that extra speed boost that the Radar gives, even if it still only has a 1GHz CPU (but newer build).

Source: WP7.com.pl

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Case studies are always fun. You can't necessarily extrapolate the information and say it will apply to all cases equally, but you can gain some inferences from such cases and look for trends across others.

In this instance, one app called 'Mortal Kombat Tactics' by Neuralnet was released both on Android and Windows Phone and offered for free. What's the difference in ad revenue? Here it is, broken down by one of the developers, Alex Perez:

Android (AdMob)

  • Day 1 - 1,866 Impressions / $0.57 Revenue
  • Day 2 - 497 Impressions / $0.27 Revenue
  • Day 3 - 521 Impressions / $0.05 Revenue
  • Day 4 - 496 Impressions / $0.25 Revenue
  • Day 5 - 304 Impressions / $0.13 Revenue

Giving us a grand total of 3,684 Impressions and $1.27 in Revenue

Windows Phone 7 (PubCenter)

  • Day 1 - 2,070 Impressions / $1.28 Revenue (already surpassed Android's 5 days)
  • Day 2 - 1,903 Impressions / $2.52 Revenue
  • Day 3 - 2,391 Impressions / $4.63 Revenue
  • Day 4 - 3,693 Impressions / $3.86 Revenue
  • Day 5 - 2,274 Impressions / $2.48 Revenue

Giving us a grand total of 12,331 Impressions and $14.77 in Revenue

What is revealing about those numbers is two-fold. For one, the Windows Phone app clearly has more visibility on the platform due to less competition. As a result, it receives more ad-impressions. Second, all else being equal, the revenue is much higher for Windows Phone than Android. In fact, overall ad revenue in this case is nearly 3x that of Android, which is quite impressive.

For the developer here, Neuralnet, Windows Phone is the clear winner, making their investment much more worth their time in development. [Funny side note, we bought the Xbox 360 Mortal Kombat game awhile ago and this was the first app we downloaded and used for the game--it's a nice app and clearly has the visibility it needs on our platform.] You can find it here in the Marketplace.

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If you've read our AT&T HTC HD7s review, we gave the phone fairly high rankings despite the let-down of Super LCD--the one key difference between it and it's brother, the HD7, on T-Mobile.

Since that review, we've managed to get a side by side between those two devices to get a better idea what, if any, the difference in screen quality there are present. In short, while the Super LCD on the AT&T HD7s is a little punchier and bolder, it's only slightly better than the HD7 and is still dwarfed by the Samsung Focus Super AMOLED, which is brighter, punchier and works better in sunlight.

Still, the HD7s looks good "in charcoal" as opposed to the chromed-out version on T-Mobile and they seemed to have fixed the loose volume rocker, which was present (and annoying) on the T-Mobile version.

The biggest disappointment though with the the HD7s/Super LCD is the "screen ghosting" (seen after the break) which we though would be fixed with the newer screen technology (the HD7 suffers from the same distortion). In conclusion, if you like the HD7 you'll like the HD7s as it slightly improves things. But if you were not sold on the HD7 before, then the HD7s willl not convince you to change up. And we really doubt and Focus owners will drop the Super AMOLED for Super LCD. And just think, this fall, Windows Phone users stand a good chance of getting a taste of Samsung's Super AMOLED Plus tech (see PhoneArena), leaving Super LCD even further behind.

Hit the break for some more "versus" photos and see for yourself. *Note: Brightness on every device here was set to 'High'.

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During today's Microsoft keynote at MIX11, a phone browser speed test was given and for once, Windows Phone (Mango + IE9) trounced the competition. The competition here was the iPhone 4 and Nexus S. 

Is it us or has Microsoft really thrown their weight behind browsers lately? IE9 on Windows Phone 7.5 looks pretty incredible and to put this persepctive, Android Central's Phil Nickinson says he doesn't know how that got the Nexus S to be that fast in the above video--which means MS wasn't playing trickery here. 

Of course we're interested in seeing more than one site load and the devil's in the details. But hey, we like what we see.

via: GeekWire

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WP Bench is a nifty free app that hit the Marketplace this weekend. It's what it sounds like, a full featured Benchmarking suite used to gauge your device's GPU, CPU, battery, display, etc. All in all, solid stuff. Couple of niggles though: you can't save results, you lose them if the screen turns off and no database to compare to other devices. But hey, for v1.0 and free, it's a great start.

  • CPU singlethreaded performance
  • CPU multithreaded performance
  • Memory read/write speed
  • Storage read/write speed
  • GPU performance
  • Display color reproduction
  • Battery life tester

We decided, for laughs, to throw it on the LG Quantum, Samsung Focus and HTC Arrive to see what we got. (hint: results were similar) You can see the results above and watch the short video after the jump to see what the app has in store. Overall, we like it. You can grab it here in the Marketplace.

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This post is for you old school kids still using the near legendary Sprint HTC Touch Pro 2--a device hacked and ROM'd to death and which approached perfection (if it weren't for that under-powered CPU). Anyways, the new Sprint HTC Arrive (aka 7 Pro) is basically a Touch Pro 3--the devices feel very similar, are nearly identical in size and quality. Still, we figured we get some close up glamor shots for you people who are curious about jumping to the new guy in town (we vote: yes, do it).

More pics after the break...

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Eck. It was bound to happen. Someone put up an iPhone 3GS up against the prototype Samsung 'Taylor" Windows Phone 7 device in a mini-browser war.

Although a lot of press have been giving Mobile IE a 'not bad as we thought' review, it still pales in comparison to Apple's HTML5 based browser.

Now in fairness, Mobile IE may not be finished yet and in fact, is probably not, so we should expect it to perform better by release. On top of that, we know Mobile IE can be updated independently of the whole OS, allowing, in theory, frequent updates to improve the browsing experience.

Having said all of that, who here would not have liked to see WP7 beat the iPhone 3GS out? It sure would have been a nice ego boost and headline grabber. And without 3rd party browsers being available, at least for awhile (Microsoft has said they may be willing to work with companies to offer browser alternatives, if demand is high enough), we won't have much choice. Come on Mobile IE team!

Watch the full, somewhat painful video, after the break!

[NewsGeek via 1800PocketPC; Thanks Saijo]

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We've already seen one 'showdown' between coding on platforms: the iPhone vs Windows Phone 7, and now we have what is perhaps the more important one, where Android takes on the new comer.

Android is perhaps more important than the iPhone because at the rate at which it is gaining, it will pass Cupertino sooner than later (they just hit 70,000 apps, nearly doubling the 38K mark in April). In fact, due to the plethora of hardware variations and carrier support, Android is quite the formidable opponent. 

Now, in fairness, this is but one person's comparison between coding on two platforms so nothing is definitive--only the free market will decide such things in the end. Still, it's nice to know that when Microsoft says it's going all out to help out and support developers, it just isn't PR spin-- a lot of them agree.

New to the scene is Mishkin Faustini, who is a fan of Windows Phone 7, so that bias should be considered, but he does a nice job of comparing and contrasting the two platforms finally mentioning that

...the dev tools for Android are laughable at best in comparison to the beauty and elegance of Microsoft dev tools

Well, we'll see when WP7 hits and how the developer community responds as a whole, talk about uphill battle, sheesh. But hey we'd rather hear good news than bad news these days about WP7's future.

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