Best WhatsApp alternatives 2022

Telegram Android App
Telegram Android App (Image credit: Windows Central)

The best WhatsApp alternatives are more important than ever. What was once an extremely popular messaging app has been slowly turned into a mess by its Facebook overlord (surprise, surprise), with unwanted data-sharing and, more recently, lengthy service downtimes. There's really no better time to delete your WhatsApp account, but where does that leave you when you want to reach out to your friends and family? If you'd rather not have Facebook dealing out your phone number, contacts, apps log, status messages, IP address, profile picture, and name, your best bet is to check out some other messaging apps that haven't yet gone over to the dark side.

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Telegram messaging app (opens in new tab)

Animated emojis!

Telegram is supported by all major platforms, and it is perhaps the next most popular open-source messenger besides WhatsApp. Video calls with up to 1,000 viewers were added this year, and you can still text and make voice calls across platforms. Available are groups with up to 200,000 people, robust file-sharing abilities, self-erasing messages, and the proprietary end-to-end encryption you want to keep your privacy intact. Telegram is free.

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Signal messaging app (opens in new tab)

Video calls galore

Signal was a great alternative to Telegram before video calling was added, and it's still a top option today. It employs open-source encryption for your texts, voice calls, and video calls, allowing you to communicate exactly how you'd like. No animated emojis here, but even the stickers are encrypted. Share GIFs, videos, and photos easily with the intuitive design. Signal works across all major platforms and includes group chats for up to 150 members. Signal is free.

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Element messaging app (opens in new tab)

Free and paid plans

Element offers free and paid versions of its messaging service, compatible with Android, iOS, Windows, Linux, and major browsers. Your messages are saved where you want them to be saved, and end-to-end encryption protects voice, video, and text. The free version allows multiple devices and as much messaging and calling (including video) as you want, while Standard and Pro versions give you more control and management over large groups.

Leaving WhatsApp for good

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Whereas many people once turned to WhatsApp for its supposed privacy, WhatsApp now requires you to share data with Facebook and its partners, including Facebook Payments, Onavo, and CrowdTangle. If you'd rather not have what you say to your friends and family used against you for, say, targeted ads, it's time to switch messaging platforms. And with the recent Facebook outage that brought down Instagram, WhatsApp, and Oculus for most of a day, it's hard to find reasons to stick with WhatsApp any longer.

Any of the above messaging apps will make a great WhatsApp alternative, but if we're suggesting just one, we'll go with Telegram. Many of us use it every day to communicate securely and efficiently, and now that video chat has been added it holds stronger to the top spot. Create enormous groups with up to 200,000 people, share all the files you want, react with animated emojis and gifs, and remain assured your data is protected thanks to secure end-to-end encryption.

There is an official Telegram Windows 10 app, but you can also check out Unigram (opens in new tab). What many consider as the best Telegram client got its biggest update yet about a half-year ago and is still relevant today.

Cale Hunt
Senior Editor, Laptop Reviews

Cale Hunt is a Senior Editor at Windows Central. He focuses mainly on laptop reviews, news, and accessory coverage. He's been reviewing laptops and accessories full time since 2016, with hundreds of reviews published for Windows Central. He is an avid PC gamer and multi-platform user, and spends most of his time either tinkering with or writing about tech.