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Microsoft: manufacturers sold over 1.5 million phones in the first six weeks

Microsoft has finally gone on the record regarding sales of Windows Phone 7. Guess what? They weren't telling us before because they were embarrassed by the numbers (or rather, they should not be). In an official press release and interview with Achim Berg, vice president of business and marketing for Windows Phones, Berg goes on record about sales figures, expectations and other aspects of Windows Phone 7. The big part of the interview, though, is where Berg discusses those numbers:

News Center: Windows Phone 7 has been in market for almost two months now worldwide, how are sales going?Berg: Sales are ramping well as our reputation is growing for offering users a unique experience and are in line with our expectations – especially when compared to other new platform introductions......Another is phone manufacturer sales – phones being bought and stocked by mobile operators and retailers on their way to customers. We are pleased that phone manufacturers sold over 1.5 million phones in the first six weeks, which helps build customer momentum and retail presence.

Of course, Microsoft has famously launched Windows Phone 7 "worldwide" on nine different devices, so making a direct comparison to the iPhone or Android not exactly accurate. Clearly, Apple had more momentum on launch even when severely hampered by supply shortages and a U.S. only launch. Still, 1.5 million is not too bad for a company many had written off in the mobile space and combined with their 18,000 developers (and growing), we think Microsoft is certainly in a good position in the end of 2010. Coming in 2011 we have "wave 2" of devices, Chassis 2 designs, numerous major updates and further roll-out of new product synergies (Xbox, Zune, Windows 8, etc.). Sounds good to us because Microsoft is ready to fight.

Speaking of updates, Berg said this, which we'll leave you with: "...We are on a path to begin releasing the first of several updates in the next couple of months".

Source: Microsoft, PressPass (opens in new tab); Thanks, ericesque, for the tip!

Daniel Rubino is the Executive Editor of Windows Central, head reviewer, podcast co-host, and analyst. He has been covering Microsoft here since 2007, back when this site was called WMExperts (and later Windows Phone Central). His interests include Windows, Microsoft Surface, laptops, next-gen computing, and arguing with people on the internet.

10 Comments
  • Not bad at all, it will be an up hill battle, but "THIS......IS......SPARTAaaaaahhh!!!!"
  • The figure represents devices shipped to manufacturers, not the number that have been purchased by consumers. Activation numbers would be more telling. Even so, the number is very small considering it was an international launch.
  • Is there any evidence that stores have a surplus of WP7 devices that aren't being sold, sitting on the shelves? I haven't any such news or reports from anyone. If anything, there were supply shortages. As far as the number being "very small", considering people were throwing around 40,000 as a realistic number just a few weeks ago, 1.5 million seems large by comparison. It's all relative.
  • Guess they would have to sell the same number of handsets as their competitors, otherwise its "small". No matter what good news comes regarding WP7, the naysayers will ALWAYS find a way to portray it negatively. Its what they live for!
  • It's true about WP7 - news medias/blogs they always throw a twist to thier stories about WP7 to make them look BAD Come to think of it thats what they say about Windows platform always but who is at the #1 spot? but seriously I switched from iPhone(cancelled my contract) to windows phone and I love it especially emailing its quick...taking a picture and emailing it or saving it on your skydrive it takes 9 seconds or less. and there are some neat features such as if your talking it fleeps phone to go on speaker or if its ringing and what to mute it just flip phone it will go silent.
  • Would be great if the big red graphic had a relationship with the actual #s (REV) were are seeing (or not) from the MktPlace :-(
  • Sales figures this early in the game are typically little more than fodder for smartphone geeks. And in most cases, especially cases that don't include an Apple product launch, they aren't going to look favorable.
    Still, these numbers are tepid at best based on the fact that that the platform launched in 30 countries. MS needs to get lower-priced devices, especially overseas where pay-as-you-go is popular. i'm reading on various UK sites/forums that the high price is really putting people off. There's also the fact that Zune and Bing aren't as robust outside of the US, issues which won't be quick fixes. Marketing is always an issue with Microsoft, although i have a feeling they're starting to get it, at least in the US. Lastly, they need to work quickly to get the OS up to par, both in features and stability. i'd love to see them update quarterly with smaller bugfixes pushed OTA as needed between updates. Hopefully these Q1 2011 do quite a bit of both.
  • I think this is a good thing MSFT did release some numbers, but it wasn't what I hoped to find though. I agree with Rico (commentor above me) that their services need to be more robust outside of North America. They should be releasing updates to their OS fairly quickly, but I think the key is getting around patents that Apple may have on things like cut/copy/paste methods. I think 2011 will be a good year for WP7. I liked Windows Mobile and I still use the OS as my preference over Android/iOS/Symbian. I think Android would be my second choice if I had to choose, but once WP7 is matured I think it will me my next mobile OS. For now, I am sticking to my HTC Fuze.
  • Well obviously they are pleased with their numbers and looking to move forward since they just hired 40 engineers to the WP7 team.
  • "Is there any evidence that stores have a surplus of WP7 devices that aren't being sold, sitting on the shelves? I haven't any such news or reports from anyone. If anything, there were supply shortages. As far as the number being "very small", considering people were throwing around 40,000 as a realistic number just a few weeks ago, 1.5 million seems large by comparison. It's all relative."Once again, I have to ask: did you actually read the interview. The report came directly from Achim Berg's mouth: "Unfortunately, we still don’t know how many actual end users have purchased Windows Phone 7 devices, but this is a start."You also didn't put things in proper context. The quotes are not from an interview, but instead were generated from a faux-interview manufactured by Microsoft PR. Mr. Berg could have said 100 million units where in the pipeline as there was no one to objectively evaluated or question the statements.That's too bad. Microsoft often hurts otherwise competent products by playing games like this.