Nokia is a special company. There's no disputing this fact and even those who follow other companies within the same, competitive industry agree that the Finnish manufacturer has brought a great deal of innovation to the table.

To celebrate what the company has achieved, Nokia has published the above video taking a quick look at nearly 150 years of business.

We've enjoyed two years of platform support from the company, if we look at Windows Phone alone. Originally releasing the Lumia 800 back in 2011, the company's history goes back even further, before Microsoft's new mobile platform. Does the Nokia 3310 ring any bells, or possibly even the NMT-900? Hardware produced with the Nokia branding were believed to sport the ability to survive nuclear fallout.

They still do.

Nokia 1100 Nokia NMT-900
Nokia NMT-900 (left), Nokia 1100 (right)

The above is a stark contrast to what's available today. Nokia has announced the Lumia 1520, Lumia 1320 and Lumia 2520. Also, let's not forget the advances made in smartphone photography packed into the Lumia 1020.

While the company has been around for some time, the last handful of years have been spent on rejuvenating the brand in multiple markets, while pushing hard on penetrating the US. Battling hard against the likes of Apple, Samsung and other manufacturers competing in the same space, the company continued its struggle, leading to Microsoft announcing plans to purchase its devices and services division.

We're often accused of being Nokia fans here at Windows Phone Central, mainly because we view the company in such a positive light. But it's hard not to. Not simply because it's a dedicated OEM to Windows Phone, but because Nokia as a brand stands for so much more in areas that aren't as technically advanced as the communities most of us are lucky to reside in.

That said, we're never afraid to pick up on stories that cover hardware issues, negative press or even bad choices made by the company.

HERE

The future of Nokia is a different one. We recently took a trip to the offices in London for a chat with Pino Bonetti, Social Media Lead at HERE, and Stuart Ryan, Director of Maps and Everyday Mobility, who both took us through exactly what the plan is should everything go through with the Microsoft acquisition. Essentially Nokia would focus on HERE, NSN (Nokia Solutions & Networks) and a strong portfolio of patents.

It'll be interesting to see how the company innovates once its mobile hardware division has been absorbed by Redmond, though we can imagine this period of time (up until the deal goes through) won't be the last we hear and see of Nokia.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments on how Nokia has contributed to not only the handheld phone industry, but to the world in general as well as your own personal lives.

Source: YouTube