Acer isn't stocking its latest Android phone in the UK, but seems quite excited for the Jade Primo.

That's what we were told by a member of Acer's UK executive team at Mobile World Congress, and at first glance sounds quite extraordinary. Android, the all encompassing dominator of the smartphone space, ignored, while a Windows 10 Mobile device comes to market. Surely not?

That seems to be the case, and for Acer at least, it seems as though the Jade Primo is the way to go in Britain. But why?

In short, partners. Enterprise partners.

It's a story we've already heard recently from HP, with the Elite X3. An enterprise focused approach to selling the phone while leaving it open for average consumers to pick one up as well. In Acer's case, you'll be able to pick up a complete package with the Jade Primo that includes a keyboard, mouse and a monitor. A package that can be sold to partners in place of a new laptop/desktop combination, perhaps.

Acer Jade Primo

By contrast, the Liquid Jade 2, essentially the Primo but running Android, will not be met with any enthusiasm in the UK, nor will it even be ranged officially. It's pretty simple, really. Why go into a market that includes the Samsung Galaxy S7, among many others. Without being harsh on Acer, one of its Android phones won't do very well in the UK. And, its enterprise partners won't want to buy the same Android phones, but they could well be taken with the Jade Primo, Continuum and the Microsoft ecosystem so many IT departments already live inside. And so this is the route the Taiwanese manufacturer is going.

Far from glamorous it may be, but the enthusiasm for the Jade Primo was evident. And it seems to hinge on the support, which one assumes is already in place, from the enterprise. You or I will be free to go out and pick one up, which is perfectly fine. No-one who wants to buy a high-end Windows 10 Mobile device will be frozen out (though regionally availability will continue to be a sticky spot). The same with HP.

So while some around the web are singing the death tune of Windows 10 Mobile already, speak to some in the industry, particularly those who actually intend to make money from it, and you hear a different song. And for the rest of us, does it really matter if enterprise props up the ecosystem, resulting in more smartphones to choose from?

It sure isn't a bad thing.