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Facebook adopts Visual Studio internally and will help improve remote development

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What you need to know

  • Facebook will adopt Visual Studio internally for development.
  • Facebook already uses Visual Studio internally in beta.
  • Facebook will also help improved remote development through Visual Studio as part of a partnership with Microsoft.

Facebook announced a partnership with Microsoft that will help remote development through Visual Studio. Additionally, Visual Studio Code will become the default development environment at Facebook. Facebook uses a wide variety of coding languages and tools, but the company has been migrating towards Visual Studio for some time.

A new post from Facebook details some of the history of development at Facebook, as well as the company's move towards Visual Studio. The post states that in 2018, Facebook announced that it would move from Nuclide, its own internal development environment, over to Visual Studio Code. Facebook explains that it moved to Visual Studio because "It runs on macOS, Windows, and Linux, and has a robust and well-defined extension API that enables us to continue building the important capabilities required for the large-scale development that is done at the company."

In addition to moving towards Visual Studio as a default development environment, Facebook also plans to improve remote development using the tool. As Facebook points out, a large amount of development is done on servers "While engineers at Facebook have Visual Studio Code installed locally on laptops, most development is done directly on individually-reserved development servers that live within our data centers." Facebook announced that in addition to using remote development extensions, the company will work with Microsoft to improve remote development extensions to help the development community.

Facebook working with Microsoft, brings a massive company into the Visual Studio environment and also provides Microsoft with feedback from a large set of developers at Facebook. Facebook concludes the post by stating, "In teaming with Microsoft, we're looking forward to being part of the community that helps Visual Studio Code continue to be a world class development tool."

Sean Endicott
News Writer and apps editor

Sean Endicott brings nearly a decade of experience covering Microsoft and Windows news to Windows Central. He joined our team in 2017 as an app reviewer and now heads up our day-to-day news coverage. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com (opens in new tab).

5 Comments
  • > "In teaming with Microsoft, we're looking forward to being part of the community that helps Visual Studio Code continue to be a world class development tool."
    So, it's not VS they are using, it's actually VSCode?
  • That's right. It says so clearly in article and source.
  • Vsc = community edition
    Vs = commercial respin/package
  • Visual Studio Code != community edition
  • The article and headline omit "Code" in many places. "Visual Studio" and "Visual Studio Code" are 2 very different development environments.