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Microsoft acquires Cloudyn to bolster Azure customer tools

Microsoft today has announced its acquisition of Cloudyn (opens in new tab), a cloud management company that provides tools to help customers understand the cost of their projects. The acquisition, Microsoft says, will bolster efforts to help Azure customers get a granular look at their cloud spending.

From Microsoft:

This acquisition fits squarely into our commitment to empower customers with the tools they need to govern their cloud adoption and realize the strategic benefits of a global, trusted, intelligent cloud. Cloudyn gives enterprise customers tools to identify, measure and analyze consumption, enable accountability and forecast future cloud spending. As a Microsoft partner, Cloudyn has supported cost management for Microsoft Azure and other public clouds, helping customers continuously improve their cloud efficiency.

The Cloudyn acquisition was previously rumored to be in the works as far back as April, but today's news confirms it. At the time, TechCrunch reported that the value of the deal hovered somewhere between 50 and 70 million. Microsoft has not revealed the cost of the acquisition, and it is still subject to regulatory approval.

Dan Thorp-Lancaster is the Editor in Chief for Windows Central. He began working with Windows Central as a news writer in 2014 and is obsessed with tech of all sorts. You can follow Dan on Twitter @DthorpL and Instagram @heyitsdtl. Got a hot tip? Send it to daniel.thorp-lancaster@futurenet.com.

6 Comments
  • RIP😑
  • I want to hear... "MS acquires HTC to bolster mobile in It's device division".......
  • HTC?
    No! Not another Nokia nonsense.
    Surface Phone is what is needed. It will run W10S on ARM.
  • To be honest, I just want them to settle on something, and keep developing it. I couldn't care less if it's a surface phone, some new Lumia, some old Lumia, or whatever else they have the option to do.
    Just do something and commit!
  • Agree.
  • Factories, man... But, it's probably less risk outsourcing production, so you're right.