Google is gearing up for a stint in the video game industry, streaming cloud-based games directly to its Chrome web browser with its upcoming service, Project Stream. Project Stream competes directly with Microsoft's own Project xCloud, with both companies trying to reach gamers on mobile devices and other screens which have typically been out of reach for console and PC game developers, without expensive work to port their games down for smaller form factors.

Google is expected to make some video game-related announcements very soon, but at least one of those has emerged early owing to a patent filing, giving us a decent idea of how it may look, and how it may function.

Google's game controller seems to follow the basic agreed-upon design conventions across the industry, including triggers and shoulder buttons, dual joysticks, a directional-pad, and four buttons on the right, as well as a couple of function keys. Where Google breaks away is in its microphone button, which seems to indicate it'll allow you to communicate with Google's smart assistant directly from the controller. The patent seems to indicate that the controller may even have a speaker or even a small display, providing "audio and visual cues" for notifications such as chat alerts, and so on.

Google is making some of its gaming-related announcements on March 19, 2019, so we'll find out sooner rather than later whether this patent will end up as a true-to-life product or is simply for illustrative purposes. The proximity to the event leads some credence to the idea that this is an accurate representation of the controller Google might push to market, starting with the Chrome web browser on PC.

Probably a better controller

Xbox One Sport Red

Tried and tested.

If you're not sold on the (likely) design of Google's controller, why not check out the new Sport Red controller from Microsoft? In addition to Xbox, it's compatible across all PCs via Bluetooth, with a proven ergonomic design that's built to last.

Thanks RepsUp100.

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