Marketplace app code-checker released

If you're a big fan of heaps, stacks, kernels and debuggers, read on. For everyone else, the short version: Microsoft has released the tool that will check an app's code compliance before it hits the Windows Marketplace for Mobile.

Before an application will be accepted into the Windows Marketplace for Mobile catalog, it must be able to perform all primary and secondary functions while the Microsoft Application Verifier Test (AppVerifier) is running. AppVerifier needs to be configured to detect heap corruption and invalid locks usage, including critical section use.

Ahhhhhhhh. Makes perfect sense. Heap corruption and invalid locks usage always bug us. And don't even get us started on critical section use. Anyhoo, it's another step toward the launch of the Marketplace and Windows Mobile 6.5.

Windows Mobile Team Blog

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3 Comments
  • Well they are trying to make it so that they only accept good applications.
    This way, if people only use the default applications and applications from the marketplace, they will have a stable OS. Lots of instability is caused by 3rd party apps so they want any 3rd party app they sell to not cause problems.
  • 6.5 needs to go away. Why was it in 2005 I had 2003SE, 2006 I had WM5, 2007 I had WM6.. and not until 2010 will I get WM7. Im a hater on 6.5 and I use it daily.
  • Ahhhhhhhh. Makes perfect sense. Heap corruption and invalid locks usage always bug us. And don't even get us started on critical section use. If you don't understand something, why bother posting it? A developer would understand what they mean, but FYI: Locks are used to prevent simultaneous access to resources.
    The heap is where a program's dynamically allocated memory resides.
    Critical sections are sections of code where no other processes/threads can run (they serve a purpose similar to locks, but are more restrictive). I hope that helps. Steve