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iPhone vs Windows Mobile, Email Smackdown

My pal Ben Higginbotham of Technology Evangelist has called me out publicly on our debate about email on the iPhone (opens in new tab). I say the iPhone sucks at email, he says it the bestest (yes, I'm oversimplifying. A lot.). I've been meaning to comment over at TE (you should consider doing it yourself, it's an interesting post (opens in new tab)), but instead am just going to do a full WMExperts Smackdown here.

I love you Ben, but you might want to go find some ointment, because I have a strong feeling this is going to sting a little. Click through for the fun.

Let's start with some general comparisons, shall we? For all comparisons, I'm talking about Windows Mobile 6 Professional Edition and iPhone version 1.1.1.

Data Speeds

So the iPhone is trapped in an EDGE + WiFi world. Higginbotham's point is that it isn't so bad and I'm here to say he's absolutely right. If you've got WiFi coverage, there's not a 3G phone on the planet that's going to beat you for data speeds. If you don't, well, then EDGE isn't much fun compared to EVDO or HSDPA. But it's not excruciating, either, truth-be-told. AT&T, for all their evil, really did built out their "fine edge" network, managing to stuff every last possible iota of bandwidth in to the EDGE standard.

Still, although EDGE + WiFi isn't so bad, it's pretty much the basement for Windows Mobile smartphones. Most have 3G, some have 3G and WiFi. Faster is better. Period.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Push email

Windows Mobile has it via Exchange Servers, Good Messaging, Blackberry connect, SEVEN's various solutions, IMAP idle in Flexmail, and so on.

iPhone has it with Yahoo mail. That's it. This one is easy:

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Look and Feel, HTML Email

Higginbotham gives a lot of points to the iPhone for displaying email so nicely. That's exactly right - email looks 100% better on the iPhone than on any Windows Mobile phone I've ever used. Period and hands-down. The scrolling is also nice and fun

Then there's HTML email - I'm of the camp that HTML email is useful for one thing and one thing only: nice looking email newsletters. Everything else, in my opinion, should be handled with text and attachments. I am willing to believe, though, that there are people out there who not only don't hate HTML email, but find it important for productivity. Strange but true, I guess.

So we're giving this one to the iPhone and I should point out that it's no small thing - emails looking good and being readable. No small thing at all, so we'll give it two points.

Advantage: iPhone x 2

Attachments

On the iPhone, you can view any office doc or pdf and forward them on. You can also view photos within emails.

On Windows Mobile, you can view any office doc or a pdf. More importantly, you can edit and create these documents directly on the phone. That's huge. Really huge.

It goes further than that, though, much further. On Windows Mobile we have this neat little thing called a "User Accessible File System." This means that Windows Mobile has these strange little concepts built-into it like "save" and "open." You can, you know, save attachments for later use. You can save a photo and then use it as a picture for your contacts.

I know, it's crazy, right? I've taken such functionality for granted for so long, it's weird when I can't. More specifically, being able to save a photo from an email so that I can use it in other contexts on the phone.

Additionally, Windows Mobile is able to attach any file to an email either from within a new email or within pretty much any other context like the photo app or the file browser. The iPhone is only able to attach photos and links from Safari or YouTube, and then only from those apps, not from within a new email.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Handling Text

This here is really the whole enchilada. Reading email is important, of course, but being productive with email is about writing out your message and sending it on.

As far as text input goes, we're going to call it a wash despite the fact that most Windows Mobile devices sport physical keyboards that I find to be much faster than the iPhone's soft keyboard. We're also going to discount the fact that Windows Mobile lets you view up to 10 lines of text you're composing at a time compared to the iPhone's 8 lines.

No, rather than focus on text "input," I want to focus on text handling.

We'll call cursor placement a wash, since the iPhone's magnifier is pretty cool. On Windows Mobile you can use the 5-way, your finger, or a stylus. I personally use a finger to get it close and then the 5-way to get it exact. What about the rest?

  • Windows Mobile: If you want to include the relevant text from a link you're sending, simply highlight the relevant text and copy it then paste it into the email. Additionally, if you want to only include some parts of an email you're forwarding, just scroll down, highlight the text you want to cut, and delete it. ...see where I'm going here?
  • iPhone: If you want to include the relevant text from a link you're sending, simply remember the paragraph you're thinking about and type it in yourself. If you want to include only some parts of an email you're forwarding, just scroll down to the bottom of what you want to delete and hold down the delete key for awhile. Sometimes a long while.

This one seems pretty clear:

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Ease Of Use - "Tap Counts"

"Ease of use" varies depending on how you prefer to interact with a device, I suppose, but I think I can convince most people with a technique an old shaman taught me long ago: Counting Taps.

Now there's a huge variety of Windows Mobile devices with a huge variety of button types out there, but there's just one iPhone. So we're going to go with a "base level" Windows Mobile Device: one with a keyboard, touchscreen, and a dedicated email button. This covers the most popular Windows Mobile Pro phones out there: the Treo 750, the Mogul, the Tilt, the 6700, and so on. We're also going to be very (VERY) generous about what a "tap" is. We'll call any interaction with your phone a "tap," whether it's

  1. a button press,
  2. a screen tap, or
  3. a screen slide.

I personally think the above list actually goes in order from easiest to most difficult in terms of quickly performing an action, but we want to be generous to the iPhone here. I should also note that in general I think that fewer taps is better, though there are exceptions to that rule like confirmation dialogs for deleting.

Opening email from an "off" state

  • Windows Mobile: (1) Power (2) Screen Lock button (3) hit the email button. 3 taps
  • iPhone: (1) Power / Home (2) Screen Lock Slide (3) Hit email button OR (4) Hit Home again to go to homescreen and (5) Hit email button. 3-5 taps, often 5.

So the advantage here probably goes to Windows Mobile, since there's a question of whether or not you need to get yourself to the home screen on the iPhone in order to open up the email app.

There's also a larger point to be made here that not all taps are created equal -- and I'm not just talking about taps vs. slides. I'm talking about context. The iPhone makes you notice what application you're in and then go back "home" to switch. There is a advantage to the very straightforward and dead-simple use of "home" as a single way to get to what you need. Windows Mobile, on the other hand, lets you ignore your current context, by and large, and just hit your button to get to email. There's an added advantage there, in my opinion, but I won't press it because I'll grant that the iPhone's method also has some benefit.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Switching email accounts

So you've opened up your email program. Once inside, you're either going to be presented with a list of your email accounts or an inbox. If you're presented with a list of your email programs, it's about even - Windows Mobile requires 1 tap to get to your inbox and the iPhone requires 2 (account, then inbox). But what if you open up email and it's already sitting in an inbox?

  • Windows Mobile: (1) Go left or right or hit the email button to switch between accounts. 1 tap per account.
  • iPhone: (1) Tap account name (2) Tap "Accounts" (3) tap new account and (4) Tap Inbox. 4 taps per account.

4 taps is just crazy. I know a lot of people manage to aggregate their email into just one account, but I am not one of those people. It's just too important that my "from" email address be context-sensitive. There's personal email and work email at the very least, and 4 taps to get from one to the other ain't gonna cut it for me.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Replying, etc.

So you're reading an email and need to act on it with some sort of forward or response. How to that go?

  • Windows Mobile:
    • Reply: (1) tap reply, start typing
    • Reply All: (1) tap menu (2) Reply sub menu (3) Reply All, start typing
    • Forward: (1) menu (2) Reply sub menu (3) Forward, start typing
    • CC: (1) Scroll up (2) Tap CC (3) enter email (4) tap back in text entry and start typing.
    • BCC: (1) Scroll up (2) Tap BCC (3) enter email (4) tap back in text entry and start typing.
    • Attach Files : (1) Tap menu (2) Tap Insert (3) Tap file type (4-6) Choose file. Forwards automatically include attachments.
    • Total taps: 20ish, depending on how long it takes to choose your attachment. Total taps not including BCC and Attach Files (see below): 11 taps.
  • iPhone:
    • Reply: (1) tap reply (2) tap reply, start typing
    • Reply All: (1) tap reply (2) tap reply all, start typing
    • Forward: (1) tap reply (2) tap forward, start typing
    • CC: (1) Tap CC (2) enter email (3) tap back in text entry
    • BCC: The iPhone cannot Blind Copy (except yourself on every email)
    • Attach files: Forward automatically include attachments; otherwise iPhone can only attach photos, youtube links, or URLs - and then it must be initiated in the Photos app, YouTube app, or in Safari.
    • Total taps not including BCC and Attach Files: 9 taps.

So the iPhone has a 2-tap advantage here, but add the complete inability to BCC and some seriously stunted attachment capability and I don't much care about those two extra taps.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Moving emails to other boxes

  • Windows Mobile: (1) tap Menu, (2) tap Move, (3) tap Folder, (4) Tap select. Alternately, within the mailbox view you can "Tap-hold" to pull up a menu with "move". 4 taps either way, but you can save opening the email up if necessary.
  • iPhone: (1) tap Move, (2) tap Folder. You must open the email in order to move it. 2 taps.

Advantage: iPhone

Deleting emails

It's a fact of life - most emails need deleting sooner or later. For me, it's usually sooner. More importantly, it's also usually in bulk. Let's start slowly and work in context, since on both the iPhone and on Windows Mobile deleting works a little differently depending on whether you're looking at a mailbox or at an email directly.

Looking at an email directly:

  • Windows Mobile: (1) Menu, (2) Delete, (3) Confirm with Yes (optional). 3 taps
  • iPhone: (1) Tap Delete, watch the pretty animation for a half second (see below). 1 tap.

Deleting a single email within a mailbox:

  • Windows Mobile: (1) highlight message (2) tap Delete, (3) Confirm with Yes (optional). 3 taps.
  • iPhone: (1) Slide finger to right on mesage, (2) tap Delete. 2 taps.

Now I personally find the slide-to-delete action on the iPhone a little tricky, but for deleting single emails it's alright.

Deleting multiple emails within a mailbox

Let's say we're deleting 5 emails in a row.

  • Windows Mobile: (1) Drag your finger/stylus across the emails you want to delete, (2) tap delete, (3) Confirm with Yes (optional). 3 taps.
  • iPhone: (1) tap Edit, (2) Tap "Delete Circle" on first email, (3) Tap Delete and watch animation for a split second, (4-11) Repeat those taps on three more emails. 11 taps.

You can also use the "slide delete" method to eliminate step 1 above, but in practice it's much easier to tap than to slide to delete when doing multiple emails - it's faster and much less likely to cause you to accidentally open the email.

Note that with Windows Mobile, the only time the number of taps is going to increase is when you have emails you don't want to delete in between the ones you do.

Although the "tap count" is closer in some of these sub-categories, with the iPhone winning most, the bulk-delete category is just a deal breaker for me. In fact, I often found myself simply using the "in email" method of deleting on the iPhone and waiting for the delete animation and for it to load the next email I want to delete simply because it was easier (and slightly faster) to not have to move my fingers off the delete button.

Add the fact that you can, if you're daring, turn off the delete confirmation in Windows Mobile to shave off a step and it's no contest.

Advantage: Windows Mobile

Final Score:

**Windows Mobile: 8, iPhone: 3**

I know, I know, a Windows Mobile-focused site gives the win to none other than... Windows Mobile! Any by a large margin, too. I will admit, though, that giving the iPhone only 1 "bonus point" for "Look and Feel" might be too cheap for some people, it certainly is for Higginbotham, who I suspect would give a couple more bonus points for the iPhone's performance in that category.

The bottom line, though, is that email on Windows Mobile is robust, powerful, and easy to use. It isn't pretty like the iPhone, but I'll compromise form well before I'd ever compromise function. I strongly suspect that in a year or so fans of both platforms will be able to honestly say they're compromising neither.

Until then, I'll use an iPhone for YouTube but keep my email where it belongs - on my AT&T Tilt.

WC Staff
WC Staff
38 Comments
  • ZOMG this was an awesome post. You're still wrong, but it was well written.
    Has anyone seen my ointment?
  • So am I wrong because you give look and feel (insert pinky into mouth) one billion points?
    Sorry about the ointment jab, sometimes I let me snark get the better of me. ;)
  • Attachments
    On the iPhone, you can view any office doc or pdf and forward them on. You can also view photos within emails.
    On Windows Mobile, you can view any office doc or a pdf. More importantly, you can edit and create these documents directly on the phone. That's huge. Really huge.
    It goes further than that, though, much further. On Windows Mobile we have this neat little thing called a "User Accessible File System." This means that Windows Mobile has these strange little concepts built-into it like "save" and "open." You can, you know, save attachments for later use. You can save a photo and then use it as a picture for your contacts.
    I know, it's crazy, right? I've taken such functionality for granted for so long, it's weird when I can't. More specifically, being able to save a photo from an email so that I can use it in other contexts on the phone.
    Additionally, Windows Mobile is able to attach any file to an email either from within a new email or within pretty much any other context like the photo app or the file browser. The iPhone is only able to attach photos and links from Safari or YouTube, and then only from those apps, not from within a new email.
    This is worth 2 points.
    Of course, for iPhone users 'teh Purty' is worth 1000 000 points. Who cares about functionality anyway.
    Surur
  • Well, there really is a point to be made that 'the Purty' actually is an important piece of functionality.
  • Thats' the thing - for a lot of apologists, "teh purty" is functionality. The functionality is literally that it's pretty when they use it.
  • Thats' the thing - for a lot of apologists, "teh purty" is functionality. The functionality is literally that it's pretty when they use it.
    Yes, but how much is it worth. I would trade being able to save attachments for any amount of Purty.
    iPhone owners obviously not. It makes one wonder about their other life choices. Do they go around driving a 2 seater sports car, even though they have children? Do they change their wives every 2 years?
    Surur
  • Well written and I am surprised Windows Mobile only won by 5 points...lol!
    Once they get 3G, native push of Exchange, and allow some amount of customization to the iPhone (yes, I know I am dreaming after all it's AT&T and Apple were talking about) I would drop my dinosaur of a Treo in a heartbeat fofr one.
  • Things will be changing. The iPhone SDK is coming and features will abound with the coming of "real" applications to the iPhone platform.
  • Heh...good sum up septimus, although between this and the podcasts it's apparent that you're struggling not to like the iPhone :D. The iPhone did get one thing right, though, and that's the display of email. It's as good as safari is. My compaint about WM6 on the treo 750 right now is that when I open an email, the font size of the "To:" "From:" Subject:" is so needlessly big that before I can see even one iota of some of my emails I have to hit the down button several times. It's important to note that once the email is displayed on the iPhone, you see most of the contents right away, and I think that's a big plus.
    Plus, keep in mind, the iPhone ain't done yet, Mail is one of those apps that just feels unfinished right now, and file system access will likely come with the SDK. But yes, PUSH blows chunks on the iPhone right now, and I love my 750 for it.
  • Yes, but how much is it worth. I would trade being able to save attachments for any amount of Purty.
    iPhone owners obviously not. It makes one wonder about their other life choices. Do they go around driving a 2 seater sports car, even though they have children? Do they change their wives every 2 years?
    Surur
    Surely only an idiot would think that.:confused: ..the point here is that win mob email is a developed application that has been on the go for years (and is still lacking in several important respects) whereas the iphone app has been on the go for a fraction of that time.
    The fact that it has taken win mob up to version 6 to be a decent email application speaks buckets.. Let's see how things stand in 2 years time and I'll wager with anyone that the latter will have improved vastly and will be a much more credible alternative.
    Having used win mob, symbian and palm devices over the past 12 months I personally find win mob to be the most "powerful" (how I hate using that word in terms of devices as it wrongly implies "better") yet the least wieldy and most cumbersome....good lord, it has taken Microsoft up to version 6 to realise it is a better idea to put "delete" as one of the soft key options.
    To compare a win mob 6 device with an iphone at email is generally rather pointless, the former are getting things done jack of all trades but master of very few devices whilst the latter are still very much multimedia centric devices with a few immature business style apps tagged on at present. But that will change and the fact that Apple has released the sdk will ensure that is sooner rather than too much later...it will be interesting to see if things have changed in 12 months time once there is a 'snappermail" type 3rd party email application available for the platform.
  • Surely only an idiot would think that.:confused: ..the point here is that win mob email is a developed application that has been on the go for years (and is still lacking in several important respects) whereas the iphone app has been on the go for a fraction of that time.
    The fact that it has taken win mob up to version 6 to be a decent email application speaks buckets.. Let's see how things stand in 2 years time and I'll wager with anyone that the latter will have improved vastly and will be a much more credible alternative.
    Having used win mob, symbian and palm devices over the past 12 months I personally find win mob to be the most "powerful" (how I hate using that word in terms of devices as it wrongly implies "better") yet the least wieldy and most cumbersome....good lord, it has taken Microsoft up to version 6 to realise it is a better idea to put "delete" as one of the soft key options.
    To compare a win mob 6 device with an iphone at email is generally rather pointless, the former are getting things done jack of all trades but master of very few devices whilst the latter are still very much multimedia centric devices with a few immature business style apps tagged on at present. But that will change and the fact that Apple has released the sdk will ensure that is sooner rather than too much later...it will be interesting to see if things have changed in 12 months time once there is a 'snappermail" type 3rd party email application available for the platform.
    Please, thats laughable. How mature does a device have to be for you to know an e-mail app needs to be able to save attachments to local memory. Did this slip the mind of those wonderful OSX engineers?
    The fact is that most of the functionality of the iPhone are an afterthought, vs the prettiness of the interface.
    Actually, maybe you are right. I remember waiting in the days of pocketpc 2003 for Microsoft to develop cut and paste. Those were terrible days... Not!
    Jobs had a choice between scroll bars, pop-up menus and cut and paste, and his whizz-bang "impress the weak of mind" flick scrolling and zooming, and guess which one he picked?
    BTW, Apple have not released an SDK yet, and when they do we still dont know if it will provide access to local resources. You know, poor iPhone users need to be protected from themselves, dont you know?
    Surur
  • Please, thats laughable. How mature does a device have to be for you to know an e-mail app needs to be able to save attachments to local memory. Did this slip the mind of those wonderful OSX engineers?
    I guess I'm in the minority, but all the years I have used windows mobile and blackberry devices, I have never once saved an attachment locally. I think its probably because the screen size and resolution make viewing these attachments difficult.
    I of course would always prefer the option to do so, especially since the iPhone screen would allow easier viewing.
  • That speaks volumes about your device use, and why an iPhone is suitable for you.
    Surur
  • That speaks volumes about your device use, and why an iPhone is suitable for you.
    Surur
    Me having no desire to download attachments on my mobile device speaks volumes why the iPhone is suitable for me? Are you kidding me? Get off your soapbox Surur, and don't assume you know anything about me.
    Could it possibly be that I just have no need to download attachments? Are mobile phones created just to fit the needs of Surur. Maybe the next phone Apple should produce will be the iSurur.
  • Me having no desire to download attachments on my mobile device speaks volumes why the iPhone is suitable for me? Are you kidding me? Get off your soapbox Surur, and don't assume you know anything about me.
    Could it possibly be that I just have no need to download attachments? Are mobile phones created just to fit the needs of Surur. Maybe the next phone Apple should produce will be the iSurur. I have never once saved an attachment locally
    So you dont think this speaks volumes about your smartphone usage? Not once, in all the years you used a smartphone?
    Face it, you dont need a smartphone, thats why you have an iPhone.
    Surur
  • So you dont think this speaks volumes about your smartphone usage? Not once, in all the years you used a smartphone?
    Face it, you dont need a smartphone, thats why you have an iPhone.
    Surur
    So, the requirements for something to be considered a smartphone is the ability to save attachments?
    I never saved attachments on my blackberry or WM devices either.
    Can anybody ever have a different opinion than the mighty Surur?
  • I am not even talking about the iPhone. I am saying YOU clearly dont need a smartphone.
    Surur
  • I am not even talking about the iPhone. I am saying YOU clearly dont need a smartphone.
    Surur
    And I'm saying the requirements for smartphone use should be more than the ability to save attachments. The thing that you have never been able to compute in your 5 month long iPhone rant, is that not everybody uses their phone for the same features that you do.
  • And I'm saying the requirements for smartphone use should be more than the ability to save attachments. The thing that you have never been able to compute in your 5 month long iPhone rant, is that not everybody uses their phone for the same features that you do.
    You are happy with a phone without
    - 3rd party apps
    - cut and paste
    - ability to access the file system
    - ability to customize the interface
    You clearly dont need a smartphone to keep you happy. Why you struggled with so many though the years you will probably never know.
    Surur
  • You are happy with a phone without
    - 3rd party apps
    - cut and paste
    - ability to access the file system
    - ability to customize the interface
    You clearly dont need a smartphone to keep you happy. Why you struggled with so many though the years you will probably never know.
    Surur
    -I would like the iPhone to have 3rd party apps
    -I would like cut and paste
    -dont really care about accesing the file system
    -I already like the interface
    But what I really do not need, is the ability to save attachments in email. Others might, but I do not.
    Not sure what you meant about struggling with smartphones. I actually enjoyed using my blackberry. If I could get my Blackberry email on the iPhone, along with syncing notes, it would be the closest thing to a perfect device for me.
  • Wow this WM side was extra generous to the iphone side.
    If he used the WM6 Email one letter short cuts I think it would have been even farthur aparts.
    Typing and filtering is great.
    One Letter shortcuts are also great!
    Regards
  • Quite simply - iPhone - visual voice mail. This is worth 5 points. We now have a tie. Dialing in to retrieve messages??? What is this, 2006? -1 for Windows Mobile. iPhone triumphant.
  • Quite simply - iPhone - visual voice mail. This is worth 5 points. We now have a tie. Dialing in to retrieve messages??? What is this, 2006? -1 for Windows Mobile. iPhone triumphant.
    Good thing you can also get visual voice mail for WM, isn't it.
    Surur
  • Let's see, are you referring to the third party apps that are available? Such as this: http://www.motionapps.com/mvisualvoicemail/_otherppc.jsp? Notice that you need to pay an additional $24.99 for this app.
    Visual voice mail is part of the iPhone's OS architecture. It is also guaranteed to work. I wonder if there are compatibility issues with these third party apps for Windows Mobile on a variety of different hardware platforms? Apparently there are serious issues.
    Speaking of price and what is included: iPhone - $399, 8 gigs
    Tilt - $300, 256MB card
    In order to get the Tilt up to 8GB you need to...wait the Tilt doesn't support 8GB cards yet. Or does it? According to the Tilt booklet it can only support 4GB. According to the AT&T website it can support up to 32GB. Which is it? Very confusing.
    You can buy a 4GB San Disk card for $74.99. So lets just say you need to buy two of these cards to equal the iPhone's storage capacity. That is a total dollar amount of $149.98. I could buy an 8GB San Disk card, but sadly there is no pricing or availability info posted yet. You also need to spend $24.99 for the previously mentioned VisualVoice mail app.
    Newly adjusted price of Tilt to equal iPhone hardware/software: $474.97
    iPhone: $399.00
    iPhone trumps Tilt with super secret Crane Kick. Mr. Miyagi smiles, Apple runs dojo now while Windows Mobile sulks with Cobra Kai team.
  • I cant believe you came back to more clearly demonstrate your ignorance. But ok...Visual voice mail is part of the iPhone's OS architecture. It is also guaranteed to work.
    Unless you unlock it and run on another network from AT&T... Or drop the data plan (save $480 over the life of the phone).. or you are roaming overseas etc etc...In order to get the Tilt up to 8GB you need to...wait the Tilt doesn't support 8GB cards yet.
    Actually it does support all SDHC cards up to 32GB.
    BTW, how much does it cost to add GPS to the iPhone.... Oh I forgot, you cant do it at all :p Tilt trumps iPhone with super secret Crane Kick. Mr. Miyagi smiles, HTC runs dojo now while OSX Mobile sulks with Cobra Kai team.
    See what I did there...
    Surur
  • You did not actually refute any of my points. Unless you unlock it and run on another network from AT&T... Or drop the data plan (save $480 over the life of the phone).. or you are roaming overseas etc etc...
    The argument you pose about unlocking the iPhone is specious reasoning. The Tilt won't work on the moon or underwater, so I guess by your logic it is an inferior product. You do not directly counter the argument that the Tilt will cost far more.Actually it does support all SDHC cards up to 32GB.
    Are you certain about this? I can't seem to locate anyone who actually has a 32GB card in the Tilt. You also avoided commenting on the observation about the discrepancy between the Tilt's owner's manual and AT&T's website.
    Alas, the iPhone does not have a GPS module that requires an additional $10 to $15 subscription per month. I guess the absolutely free wireless iTunes app and iPod feature will have to suffice.
    The iPhone SDK is being released in January 08. The rush of quality third party apps should be quite astounding...
  • You came back again? My God! Dont you know when you are beaten?If you drop the data plan, your much vaunted visual voice mail wont work. True or false?
    And are you forgetting more than 20% if iPhones have been unlocked, run on "unauthorized networks" and have never seen your built-in visual voice mail?
    And yes, 8GB microSD cards (the highest capacity available at present) have been tested and found to work on the Tilt. The theoretical maximum size for SDHC cards are 32GB.
    BTW, the Tilt has a stand alone GPS receiver, meaning you can use any GPS software, including Google maps and live search, or TomTom etc.The iPhone SDK is being released in January 08. The rush of quality third party apps should be quite astounding...
    Yes, if your phone is as crippled as the iPhone clearly is, I bet you cant wait for 3rd party apps, quality or not.I guess the absolutely free wireless iTunes app and iPod feature will have to suffice.
    :D :D :D Yes, isn't it great that Apple gives you even more ways to spend your money with them. And paying twice for ring tones on your iphone.... how could any Apple fanboy resist.
    The fact is that the Tilt is a powerful smartphone, whereas the iPhone is a trumped up LG Voyager. And isnt it horrible the way Apple copied the LG Prada ... no shame at all...
    I hope you do realize the iPhone is just a feature phone.. you know, thats why you pay feature phone data rates....
    Surur
  • You are still dodging the issue of total cost of ownership. If you drop the data plan, your much vaunted visual voice mail wont work. True or false?
    This logic is flawed. As stated in a prior post your reasoning is specious. Without a data/service plan no mobile will work properly. There is no carrier that does not charge for SMS or other types of data transfer(s). You cannot (according to AT&T's T&C) use a MediaNet or Smartphone plan on the Tilt. Smartphones, according to AT&T, are phones with PDA functionality but not full keyboards. Unfortunately, this is a huge training issue for AT&T. Most of the reps don't really understand which plans belong with which phones. That said, if AT&T audits their plans and discovers the discrepancy, they can charge you handsomely for having the wrong type of plan on the phone. Running a plan that shouldn't be provisioned onto the phone is something you do strictly at your own risk. Yes, isn't it great that Apple gives you even more ways to spend your money with them. And paying twice for ring tones on your iphone.... how could any Apple fanboy resist.
    You must be using someone else's money to pay for all of those great Tilt features that charge a premium.And yes, 8GB microSD cards (the highest capacity available at present) have been tested and found to work on the Tilt. The theoretical maximum size for SDHC cards are 32GB.
    Theoretically the iPhone keeps Bengal Tigers at bay. The Tilt cannot push past the 8GB card limit. What is the price for one of these 8GB cards? And are you forgetting more than 20% if iPhones have been unlocked, run on "unauthorized networks" and have never seen your built-in visual voice mail?
    20%, huh? suppose you are alluding to these numbers:
    http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/iphone-unlocked/250000-unlocked-iphones-have-...
    1.4 million inferior iPhones have been sold since launch. 250,000 iPhones are unlocked and have not seen visual voice mail. Yet there are still 250,000 people using an unlocked iPhone. That is a lot of people willing to use such an unworthy device without the full benefit of all its features. How many units of the Tilt are going to be sold?
    A question: Who is this hardware maker HTC? What other phones/products have they designed? Are they a reliable vendor?
    Also, AT&T has some dubious policies I am leery of. I do not like their SMS policy. Do you pay for inbound texts as well? Do you pay for texts that are sent/received between AT&T customers? I have received 5 different answers from AT&T about this.
    AT&T billing is intractbale as well. I switched to a finite number of text messages a while back and of course the change was not recorded. I have a confirmation number for that supposed change and when I called AT&T billing I have been hung-up on twice and told once that a serious mistake was made and that my service plan should have never been authorized for such a change...
  • You are still dodging the issue of total cost of ownership.
    As you said, the iPhone is not a smartphone. You usually pay more to get more. Like a 3G capable device with built-in GPS receiver.
    BTW, 8GB microSD is little more than $100, and in 3 months will be much less.
    BTW, HTC shipped more than 10 million smartphones in their last financial year, and aim to ship 20 million in the next. They are also a launch partner for the Google Android operating system, and will be making 3 handsets for them. They have also said they will do a few Wimax devices.
    Surur
  • Is there still any application which allows to downalod edit and resend any attachment via email on iphone?? JIgar
  • I doubt there ever was, I never heard of such features on the iPhone free
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  • Nice post, i think the verdict is very wrong though. Just the look of the windows mobile alone hands the win to the iphone. I cant see how it can win 8-3.
  • thank you ar nice
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  • If i buy the open office applications can I downlaod documents and edit then and email them back ??
  • IPhone has so many holes, because it has cool features, that is NOT another smart phones. For me the killer feature is that I can use all the features of Mac or Windows PC. When a Windows Mobile phone can do, then we can compare apples to apples.
  • Windows Mobile is able to attach any file to an email either from within a new email or within pretty much any other context like the photo app or the file browser. The iPhone is only able to attach photos and links from Safari or YouTube, and then only from those apps, not from within a new email.