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The Wall Street Journal is killing its Windows 10 app

Another big name is about to drop support for its Windows app: The Wall Street Journal. The media outlet has revealed that it will discontinue its Windows 10 PC and Mobile app as of June 30.

The Wall Street Journal has started alerting users in its app, as well as in its Windows Store description, on the impending shutdown. Perhaps frustratingly for avid fans of Microsoft's platform, the alert recommends checking out content from The Wall Street Journal in its iOS and Android apps, as well as online.

The Wall Street Journal initially launched its universal Windows 10 app in late 2015, and it's fairly well put together. It's unfortunate to see it go, but there are usually pretty good reasons (from a business perspective) for such a move. In this case, it's likely that the app wasn't seeing enough use to justify its continued development.

In any case, you can still check out The Wall Street Journal on the Windows Store ahead of its shutdown. It's not clear, however, if the app will completely stop working on June 30, or if it will just be retired from the Store.

Thanks for the tip, Brandon!

Download The Wall Street Journal from the Windows Store (opens in new tab)

Dan Thorp-Lancaster is the Editor in Chief for Windows Central. He began working with Windows Central as a news writer in 2014 and is obsessed with tech of all sorts. You can follow Dan on Twitter @DthorpL and Instagram @heyitsdtl. Got a hot tip? Send it to daniel.thorp-lancaster@futurenet.com.

108 Comments
  • Eh seems like a dying business to me anyway
  • dfsfsd
  • Are you referring to Window 10 apps?  Because you'd be right.
  • Both that and newspapers
  • Windows 10 store just got spotify and itunes. More people use thode than WSJ.
  • iTunes doesn't exist on the Store...
  • Yeah you are right the Win10 Store is indeed dying, and Microsoft does not seem to get that without a solid Mobile presence the store is considered useless by most desktop users who are not interested in mobile style apps on their PC.  
  • really? seems more like denial to me.
  • Why do they always tell you to check out their apps on another platform? Obviously we would be using those if we used those platforms. Such a copout answer for a solution.
  • Because at the 100th app telling you that, you may realize that other platforms would enable you to enjoy the services you use at thier best and you may even switch.
  • True enough,
  • Missed that...
  • Nope not switching for apps. I've got email, internet, phone calls, texts, alarm, skype (for now.), and my a few other things. For me apps do not make a platform. But i know for others it does. I just like the look and how windows mobile is in use.
  • Not saying you can't live without the advanced features that apps offer compared to websites. He made a silly question and I explained why it makes sense to tell your user that you are just killing one app while the others are still available.
  • Very shortsighted.  Many users of the app would be corporate users.  The majority of companies haven't upgraded to Windows 10 yet.  I am in the process of getting a new laptop that will have Windows 10. They will likely want to revisit this next year, or create a PWA...
  • Those corporate users will read on the website
  • For most corporates the store will be disabled I guess. At least that's how it is at the company I'm working.
  • Actually that's not the case. The store can be controlled and customized for corporate without requiring on premises equipment while allowing centralized purchasing, updating, and transfer of licensing. All without requiring administrator permissions for app installions allowing self service. I work in IT and I use the store for clients as a way to allow their employees to install software without requiring full rights or IT staff. Soon they will be able to do the same with Office even and the process will become much smoother and allow It to focus on crucial tasks such as infrastructure maintenance.
  • Shortsighted for sure. If they we're paying attention to website analytics, they would know that for stocks, trading, and news, most use a PC with multiple monitors, not a phone.
  • And their website and app analytics will probably also show that like 99% of the PC traffic comes from the website and so they are focusing all their efforts there.
  • ...aaaand another useless app I don't use!
  • First time a App I been using daily get's cut :/. Well I guess I cancel that subscription the Homepage is a lot less convenient to use on my Surface and I will miss the Notifications.
    I just hope the Guardian stays around.
  • Hopefully there's an executive at the WSJ who will also see the value in the app and stop this.
  • As subscribers you guys should Voice your opinions to someone at the company. Might fall on deaf ears, but may be worth a shot.
  • That sucks, I just renewed my subscription and the main way I read it is with the app, both on the phone and on the computer. Shure the website works fine but without the app you don't get the live tiles or notifications, which are both really great in the WSJ app. Seems like a big prestige loss for MS, especially on the enterprise side. 
  • See, I'm a huge Windows fan and a WSJ subscriber and I've never used the apps.  On computer, tablet, and phone (all Win10) I just use the webpage.
  • I'm using it on the PC. It's quite a sad development. I remember that they updated their app very frequently at the beginning, basically weekly or even more.
  • Exactly why UWP was doomed the minute Nadella abandoned (or retrenched) the mobile OS.  Mary Jo Foley, amoung others, pointed out this future over two years ago in February 2015.  People use the web on PC's, and apps on mobile.  With no mobile phones running Microsoft's OS and people using the web, why bother building UWP?  https://redmondmag.com/articles/2015/03/01/microsoft-universal-apps-stra... This was all way more accurately predicted than Microsoft's 1 billion devices.  Sadly, Nadella still doesn't get it and doesn't understand the long-term damage his lack of foresight has inflicted on Microsoft.  If the cloud business ever slips, Microsoft's vaulted stock price will drop like a rock.   
  • Yup dumbest move ever. As dumb as people not caring about apps leaving.
  • Man we don't need those apps, we do have a connection to the web
  • Yeah probably it's the rest of the world thst is stupid. Why do they like performance and notifications and widgets and so on? I really can't understand.... :D I don't even know why I'm using the WC app instead of the website that crashed when I tried to reply to your message....
  • The UWP is not about mobile apps. It's an app model that works across devices. I'm sick of people regurgitating other peoples misguided opinions.
  • you guys should Voice your opinions to someone at the company. Might fall on deaf ears, but may be worth a shot
  • you guys should Voice your opinions to someone at the company. Might fall on deaf ears, but may be worth a shot
  • Too bad since this was a really nice app for both the phone and desktop. I guess it's time for me to drop the WSJ.
  • Well, it is all about cost. The code won't disappear, and if Windows on Arms required not many costly changes to update, then they could come back. All depends how successful Win on Arms is, if it creates enough content consumption devices (read tablets) for them to justify the app maintenance cost. It makes little sense to have an "app" for K&M desktop only. A browser is good enough for that as it was the case ever since. Win on Arms is the key to Store apps success.
  • How does Windows on Arm help over a UWP app? Our site is on line for you computer users. No one uses Windows phone. End of story from the point of view of the WSJ.
  • Because most "apps" are content consumption based. Windows on Arm can increase the market for windows based tablets. Tablets (and hopefully phones in the future) demand "app" based model.
  • Does anyone actually read the wsj.......on purpose?
  • ^This. Newspaper like WSJ is in a dying business. Plus people now are using news aggregator services. I am happy using Nextgen Reader to select what news and from what outlets. Certainly not from a fake news outlet.
  • So long as the FREE Windows News app still pulls WSJ highlight articles, who needs a dedicated app for them...
  • well this sucks. I mean with over 600 million users Developers want to retire their apps from windows store.
  • 600 million users that do not visit the app store. Why install an app when the full website is available and just as good?
  • How many of that 600 are in New York
  • Uhm, so the WSJ is ending support for their Windows 10 app just as Windows 10 S is being launched, more high-powered tablets are coming to market, we're soon to see Windows 10 on ARM devices, and most corporations are still in the process of upgrading to Windows 10...? I'm sure the cost per active user is too high at present, but are they not considering the future at all?
  • Their website will work just fine on all of those systems. 
  • I'm sure the web site will work on iOS and Android as well.
  • It is ok I am sure, but not as good as an app. iOS and Android don't have full, desktop browsers. An app makes more sense on Android and iOS.
  • Any good news app replacements?
  • msn cbs usa today are solid
  • Awesome thanks.
  • You can't be serious. Those apps are not replacements. The quality of news those services provide is nowhere near the WSJ
  • Yeah, the CBS app is nice.
  • The wsj on iphone is great!
  • Oh dear windows 10 apps starting to go that's not good at all. Windows 10 s needs all the apps it can get
  • NO **** sherlock.....sorry I could not help myself...that one is too easy!  ha ha
  • Hopefully an actual conservative publication takes it's place. Progressive Republicans like WSJ staff are the worst.
  • Retrenching was such a good idea. Nobody uses those apps on a pc and since there are no mobile users left, who can blame them. By the time MS releases their next attempt at mobile there will be very few apps left. I guess the MS managers getting paid a few million a year know what they are doing, but it makes no sense to me.
  • It is important that everyone understand that the future is web pages.  Many apps on all platforms including Apple, Microsoft, etc. will be phased out over the comming years in favor of web pages.  Why?  Simply stated, because web pages run anywhere.  A web page can be access on a refridgerator, television, automobile, game console, bilboard, mobile telephones and yes computers.  Cleverly written web pages can run with no internet connection at all. The reason is very simple.  Utilizing web pages ensures lowest cost of development to reach the broadest number of devices.
  • W10M make take the first hit, but it's only a matter of time before exec's realize, supporting other platforms is as much as a waste as the next. As for making changes to current websites, most websites are responsive and all other platforms can all be replaced with the existing website. dare anyone to stop website development.. 
  • PWAs are on the way
  • That "future" has been around for several years now and it sucks because a good app beats web-based software every time. I'm old enough to remember days when my applications weren't crippled by running within another application that controlled how it was displayed. I also remember when my entire screen wouldn't refresh just because I was navigating to another page. I also remember the days when my software didn't check with the server to see if there were code updates every time I opened a page or dialog box. I also remember when the client-server paradigm was valued because efficiencies could be gained by distributing processing tasks to powerful clients. I also remember the days when people were critical of Visual Basic because it was slow enough to be noticeable when it rendered its UI. Ha! It's lightning quick compared to "state-of-the-art" web apps.
  • It also gives lowest common denominator experience to everyone using it.
  • Why because I wont pay for a subscription! WSJ did not give full access! You had to have a subscription. What did they expect! CBS news for example has more engagement I hope because they allow full access! WSJ should have followed this model for more engagement.
  • Given how awful the comments sections are on most news sites, I'd rather them focus on the subscription model. 
  • WSJ is a fakestream propaganda outlet. The less people read their lies, the better the world will be.
  • I haven't opened up the app store in a while and when I do, I bet ill still see the same apps in the spotlight lol
  • True. I find that pretty dismal. No company will truly want to be associated with such a poor app store. At least I wouldn't if I were calling the shots at WSJ app development.
  • Considering how newspapers are dying, you would think they should want to be on as many platforms as possible.  Personally, I didn't even know there was a Wall Street Journal app.  Maybe they need to try and advertist it instead of just hoping people will discover it.
  • Garbage app, installed and uninstalled the same day.
  • Another example of not everything needing an app.  WSJ app is just a news reader app for their articles I assume, I never used it.  I can't imagine there was much functionality it had over just using any browser to do the same, maybe easier sharing of articles. but certain things just need to have a good web site that functions on all the main browsers (Chrome, Edge, IE, Firefox, Opera, Safari)
  • I use the app quite a bit and thought it was excellent. Really sorry to see it go. I immediately call WSJ to cancel my subscription. They offered 25% off my already reduced subscription rate plus a full year of Amazon Prime. The Prime offer is what kept me on since the paper itself has been getting thinner and less useful. If they don't offer me any incentive on the next renewal I will probably leave. Business news is always available elsewhere anyway. Maybe when they get enough cancellations they'll realize their subscriber base does use the app.
  • You mean you are paying for that sh#t? Wow
  • I am sure they already did the analysis of their subscriber base.  The three windows phone app users who cancel won't likely cause them to lose any sleep.
  • How about, they are making a UWP app 😜😏🙄 🤔
  • Huh.  Not windows phone but the UWP for windows PC as well?  I could almost see stopping work (on the assumption that windows is a defunct pc platform, right?) but why pull the app?  It's no doubt just calling into an existing backend api that the other products are calling.  Just sounds spiteful. Oh, well, glad I didn't buy a subscription right? (That said, single source news apps are not overly helpful anyway.  Only really good for subcription content).  
  • I just downloaded this app! Well time to delete it!
  • Nadella..... Mobile retrenchment..... Death of Microsoft.
  • They retrenched into the grave.
  • Good. WSJ is fake news anyway, I don't want it anywhere near my platform.
  • Another one bites the dust
  • I dont think I ever read or visted that place before.
  • I have the app on my ulrabook but don't use it. I'm either using the website on my BlackBerry Passport browser or in Edge on the ultrabook.   By the way, WSJ abandoned it's app for BB10 pretty soon into BB10.  Probably reason is the same, user base doesn't justify cost. 
  • Good!! One less fake news site in the store.
  • Good news...hardly used it...trash app...
  • They are Fake News anyway who cares? Its obvious nobody reads them...
  • Well no loss there I suppose.
  • Fake news!
  • What the WSJ doesn't know is that the most useful aspect of the app is the notifications it provides, without which will lead to fewer visits to the website. I gave them feedback on the app when first launched, letting them know that it was useless without access to the commenting forum on each article The best they could do was to iframe the comments within the app, which is utterly unappealing and mostly useless . I'd use the app more than the website if they had added comments to it natively, as it has some other great features that are hard to gather from the web.
  • WSJ LOL. right up there with CNN and NYT 😂
  • I have a powerful laptop...no need for apps🤣 This thing called a browser rules.
  • Dear Wall Street Journal, I recommend that you check out content from other news outlets, since that is where I will be getting my news from now. Unfortunately, there is not enough user interest in my case to justify switching to online to read your articles. I regret to inform you that in order to get me back, you will probably need to publish a good Windows 10 UWP app. Thanks for your understanding as I give you the same response I do to other businesses who try this approach. On a side note, I'm kinda joking, since these days you can basically make a webpage into an app by pinning it, but it's still frustrating to see this.
  • Sad to see it go, but I never had any use for it. I would be concerned if WhatsApp pulls it app out.
  • I dumped this app a long time ago. Use Bloomberg and Money; that's good for me...
  • who use WSJ????
  • Wow people still read WSJ post FOX owner - Rupert Murdoch's acquisition of WSJ almost ten years ago! They publish rubbish as though they are gold. Their source of news are opposition figures hell bent of bringing democratically appointed government down when their failed to do so during election. WSJ never even bother to double check the source! Oh its in the news that one of its journalist - Solomon I think his name is - just got fired! for allegation of getting 10% of commission from an Iranian arm dealer-mogul. Solomon wrote extensively on issues relating to the middle east. His colleague is suggestion review of all articles written by Solomon to see 'how bad the situation is'.
  • The WSJ have had to make 180 corrections in just the last two weeks alone! They would need a separate app just for that!
  • Oh no! Where will I get my fake news from now?
  • From the mother of them all: NYT!
  • This is the same thing Spotify went thru, we all thought they stopped supporting the platform but they were just rewriting the app. Maybe they are doing the same thing 😊 with Wall Street Journal 😜🙄 🤔
  • Why? It's already a universal windows 10 app. In addition they are closing down the "what's news" app for Android as well.
  • That's a Bummer!🙄🙄
  • No point beating a dead horse...
  • I see this having less to do with market share than other factors. Seems stupid to me to have a separate app for every publication that I want to read. I will always use an rss/feed reader.
  • I wasn't aware they even had a Windows 10 app.
  • One less app that W10S users will have access to.
  • Received this chat response from a Dow Jones/WSJ rep on this issue - their response! Hmmm! You are now chatting with Anabelle Doug: I recently heard through another source, and not from Dow Jones, that you are discontinuing WSJ app availability on Windows 10 desktops and Windows 10 phones. Is this true? Anabelle: Hi, Dough. I'll be happy to assist you in answering your questions regarding the WSJ app. I'll be happy to assist you. Doug: thanks Anabelle: You're welcome. Anabelle: As of the moment we don't receive any information of this issue. Anabelle: But we will be notifying the customer if that will happen. Doug: ok?! It was quoted yesterday on WindowsCentral.com. Attached is the link - Doug: The Wall Street Journal is killing its Windows 10 app 21 June 2017 76 The Wall Street Journal has revealed that it will drop support for its Windows 10 PC and Mobile app on June 30 Anabelle: We don't have notification on this matter. Anabelle: We Have new app released to the app store. Anabelle: but not removing the app store. Doug: ok. thanks! We'll just see for the future! Hope you keep BOTH!
  • The truth is, that most of these apps are web wrappers, and web wrappers are getting (and should have always been) obsolete. Microsoft should add a way to "appify" instances of any website, plus integrate Bing into store search.