The Lenovo X1 Carbon is one of those legacy devices for business users that keeps on getting better (well, ever since the 2015 revamp that fixed so many wrongs). For 2016, Lenovo is going further in making the Carbon the go-to laptop for enterprise users who want a traditional Ultrabook but also want some bragging rights.

The biggest hardware change is the inclusion of Intel Skylake Core i5 and Core i7 processors. With lower heat production, less power consumption and smaller size the changeup is completely expected and also welcomed.

The display options also changed. The 2016 X1 Carbon is now all non-touch as Lenovo has separated the touch variant into the new X1 Yoga line. I think that makes sense and makes the Carbon a more laptop-only device for those who do not need a 14-inch touch screen. Additionally, the new displays are also better looking than last year's, which were washed out and uninspiring. Options still include Full HD (1080p) or WQHD for those who want more pixels.

Like the X1 Yoga the new 2016 X1 Carbon has a revamped fingerprint ID reader that relies on the touch input rather than swipe. It's a subtle change, but one that makes a big difference as you will be using that feature a lot to unlock Windows 10.

Also, users can now buy a preconfigured version with up to 1TB PCIe NVMe SSD, which is rather impressive (most of the drives are sourced from Samsung, in case you were wondering). For ports, you're looking at:

  • 3 x USB 3.0
  • OneLink+ (RJ45)
  • MiniDP
  • HDMI
  • microSD
  • 3.5mm headset jack
  • LTE modem (optional)

The beauty of the 2016 X1 Carbon is all of it fits in a package that weighs just 2.6lbs (1.18 kg). Battery life is claimed to be 11 hours, but since that is based on video playback that unfairly bumps numbers, we'll have to see what that is like in real life.

The 2016 X1 Carbon is looking to be a real winner for those in business who want all work, but some style too. Look for the X1 Carbon to hit the market in February starting at $1299. The only question we have is X1 Yoga or X1 Carbon?

More Lenovo hands-on at CES