ASUS ROG Strix X570-E GamingSource: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central

What you need to know

  • The world's been facing a serious semiconductor shortage for over a year.
  • As a result, companies such as NVIDIA, Intel, and AMD have been unable to keep up with consumer demand.
  • AMD's CEO estimates the trend won't change before 2021 is over.

AMD's CEO isn't beating around the bush: The shortage that has ravaged chip supplies throughout 2021 isn't set to get better this year. If you're looking for a return to normalcy, 2022 is your next best hope.

In an interview with Barron's, Su discussed a wide variety of topics, including how the pandemic has affected AMD and its operations (via PC Gamer). As has been stated by just about every other company under the sun, Su said that 2022 is the earliest people should expect strained supply chains' fortunes to change.

Barron's also asked Su how AMD has navigated the volatile semiconductor sector over the course of the pandemic.

"We make many of these decisions years in advance," Su said. "But what's happened over the past 12 months is that the demand has far exceeded even our aggressive expectations. From our standpoint it is very much about continuing to ramp capacity, because we do have such strong demand."

VPN Deals: Lifetime license for $16, monthly plans at $1 & more

So, there you have it. In case you thought differently, know that things aren't getting better in the immediate future.

The interview also contains nuggets about AMD's strategy against the likes of NVIDIA and Intel. In it, Su talks up how AMD pioneered certain chiplet technology and is keen on staying competitive by innovating. If you're interested in seeing the full discussion, be sure to head over to Barron's.

Alternatively, if you want more AMD content right here on Windows Central, check out our coverage. We've recently discussed the pros and cons of AMD's laptop battery life strategy, reported on the company's crypto-clouded quarterly earnings, and highlighted its recent successes.