Xbox Series X 2024 (Brooklin): Features, price, design, and everything we know so far

Xbox Series X 2024
(Image credit: Microsoft)
Xbox Brooklin

Price: $499 (expected)
Announce: Jun/Jul 2024
Release Date: Oct/Nov 2024

As is historically the case with console hardware cycles, Microsoft is rumored to be working on a mid-gen refresh of the Xbox Series X that will launch later this year with an updated design and a handful of new features. Details about the console, codenamed Brooklin, leaked last year when unredacted documents were uploaded by Microsoft to the FCC, and accidentally published.

In fact, Microsoft is planning a refresh of its entire Xbox hardware lineup, including a new Xbox Series S and a new Xbox Controller. Thanks to those unredacted FCC documents, we know pretty much everything there is to know about these new consoles — assuming plans haven't vastly changed between then and now. 

So, let's break down everything we know about Xbox Brooklin. 

Xbox Series X 2024 (Brooklin) Price & Release Date

The 2024 schedule for new Xbox hardware.  (Image credit: Microsoft)

Microsoft is planning to launch the new Xbox Series X this year, with an announcement expected in late June or early July. I suspect this will likely happen during the company's annual Xbox Games Showcase event, which usually takes place around this time. Once the hardware is announced, Microsoft will launch the console later in the year, around late October or early November 2024. 

It's expected that the new Xbox Series X will launch with a retail price tag of $499, matching that of the current Xbox Series X, but with double the storage from 1TB to 2TB. Around this time, you will likely be able to find the older Xbox Series X on discount, as that model will have been discontinued by then.

Xbox Series X 2024 (Brooklin) Design & Ports

FCC documents detail the main changes on the new Xbox Series X. (Image credit: Microsoft)

The new Xbox Series X will feature a refreshed design that maintains the same vertical orientation as the 2020 Xbox Series X, but with a cylindrical chassis that places the power button and ports in a new location on the front of the console. Internally, Microsoft describes the new Xbox Series X as having a "beautiful and innovative new design."

The leaked console render reveals that the Xbox power button, controller pairing button, and a new USB-C port will be placed in a vertical orientation on the front of the console, down towards the base. That front USB-C port will replace the USB-A port that's found on the current Xbox Series X.

The render also reveals that the new Xbox Series X won't have a disc drive, which likely allows for the unique cylindrical design. Microsoft calls the new Xbox Series X an all-digital console, just like the Xbox Series S. Hopefully, the lack of a disc drive will reduce the overall footprint of the console.

We don't have any renders of the back of the console, but it's likely to feature an identical setup to that of the current Xbox Series X, which consists of two USB-A ports, an Xbox Expansion Card slot, HDMI, ethernet, optical audio, and power ports. 

Interestingly, Microsoft may allow people to customize the external design of the new Xbox Series X, as the internal FCC documents list the console as being part of its Xbox Design Lab

The Xbox Design Lab currently lets customers build their own custom Xbox Controllers, with the ability to specify colors of individual components and more. Adding the Xbox Series X to the Xbox Design Lab might allow customers to choose their own chassis coloring, along with other tweaks and customizations. 

Xbox Series X 2024 (Brooklin) Specs & Performance

An overview of the spec upgrades across Microsoft's refreshed Xbox hardware lineup.  (Image credit: Microsoft)

In addition to the refreshed design, the new Xbox Series X will also include improved specifications in a number of areas. According to the leaked FCC documents, Brooklin will include support for Wi-Fi 6E speeds, which is a big upgrade over the Wi-Fi 6 speeds found on the current Xbox Series X.

Wi-Fi 6E should enable faster downloads over a wireless connection, as well as better signal performance. In addition to Wi-Fi 6E, the new Xbox Series X will also feature Bluetooth 5.2, which will be a first for Xbox. The current Xbox Series X doesn't support Bluetooth at all, so the introduction of Bluetooth 5.2 will be a welcome one.

The introduction of Bluetooth on Xbox will allow gamers to wirelessly connect Bluetooth peripherals to the console. It's unclear if this will allow third-party Bluetooth controllers to connect, or if it'll be limited to audio accessories only. 

Another detail mentioned in the FCC documents is that the new Xbox Series X will come with 2TB of storage for the first time. Currently, the Xbox Series X is only available in a 1TB configuration, with the ability to expand that storage with an Xbox Expansion Card. The introduction of a 2TB model will be a welcome one for those of us who switch between multiple games on a regular basis.

Lastly, we know the new Xbox Series X will include a smaller die for improved efficiency. This should allow the console to run cooler and quieter while pulling less power from the wall.

Based on the unredacted FCC documents, it doesn't look like this new Xbox Series X delivers any raw performance upgrades, meaning it's unlikely to be marketed as an Xbox Series X "Pro" or "Elite." It will play all the same games just like the original Xbox Series X, but with better energy efficiency and faster wireless connectivity.

Xbox Series X 2024 (Brooklin) Controller & Features

All the details on Microsoft's new Xbox controller. (Image credit: Microsoft)

The new Xbox Series X is expected to ship with a new Xbox Universal Controller, which Microsoft describes as a "large" update in its internal documentation. The new controller, codenamed Sebile will feature an improved design with modular thumb sticks, improved longevity, and an overall better build all while maintaining the same ergonomics and layouts of the existing Xbox controller.

Sebile will also include new features, such as lift to wake, and may even come with a replaceable, rechargeable battery by default. Microsoft also touts new connectivity features, including support for Xbox Wireless 2.0, Bluetooth 5.2, and a new mode that will let the controller connect directly to the internet for Xbox Game Pass play, similar to the old Google Stadia controller. 

Being able to connect the controller directly to the internet should reduce latancy when playing games using Xbox Game Pass. The controller will also be able to sync with the Xbox app on your phone, where you will be able to see paired devices and manage your Xbox controller.

In regards to the console hardware itself, thanks to the shrunken die, the new Xbox Series X will have a 20% more energy efficient low power standby mode, which means it will pull less power from the wall when in sleep mode. 

Microsoft's documents also mention that the new Xbox Series X will ship in 100% recycled packaging, and use an increased amount of post-consumer recycled plastic on the external console chassis. 

Zac Bowden
Senior Editor

Zac Bowden is a Senior Editor at Windows Central. Bringing you exclusive coverage into the world of Windows on PCs, tablets, phones, and more. Also an avid collector of rare Microsoft prototype devices! Keep in touch on Twitter and Threads

  • Simon Gregory
    Presumably this will only sit vertically then?

    Lack of physical media drive is also a big -ve IMO.

    The cons outweigh the pros. May as well go for a cheaper original Series X and get some storage expansion with the change!
    Reply
  • Jack Pipsam
    I'm concerned this means they're going to entirely phase out disc versions of the Xbox Series. A fair amount of my Xbox 360, Xbox One & Xbox Series library (outside of Indies) are physical releases. Even the new Prince of Persia, I bought physically the other day. Smart Delivery has been fantastic as a multi generation console owner.

    If they stop supporting physical, then my multi-decade ownership of Xbox might come to a legitimate close.
    Reply
  • Papo Type R
    It looks like this article has some outdated rumors... Project Brooklin is said to have been scraped last month. The rumor is that Microsoft in a quarterly project meeting, scrapted a 2024 mid-gen refresh of the Xbox Serise X in order to release it's next-gen (problaby "Xbox Next") 2 years earlier than planned (2026 release instead of planned 2028). Of course everything here and ths article are rumors since Microsoft has not officially released any information on any of this and could have filed old projects in the court battle to acquire Activision on the off chance that documents were leaked to the public (as so happens it did).
    Reply
  • Papo Type R
    Jack Pipsam said:
    I'm concerned this means they're going to entirely phase out disc versions of the Xbox Series. A fair amount of my Xbox 360, Xbox One & Xbox Series library (outside of Indies) are physical releases. Even the new Prince of Persia, I bought physically the other day. Smart Delivery has been fantastic as a multi generation console owner.

    If they stop supporting physical, then my multi-decade ownership of Xbox might come to a legitimate close.
    Oh, this has been the plan with Microsoft since before the One X release. Microsoft has been wanting to go only digital for over 5 years now. They want to follow how PC's do it now that get games from Steam, Epic, Battle.net, etc... but with the Microsoft Store. One of the reasons Microsoft is Beta testing "Cloud Gaming" for the console. Microsoft is a PC company and they want to bring the Xbox closer and closer to the land of PC gaming.
    Reply
  • Dush Ku
    If not a physical retail store, what will be the competing store on series x to purchase software
    Reply
  • fjtorres5591
    Dush Ku said:
    If not a physical retail store, what will be the competing store on series x to purchase software
    Online stores mostly, but B&M too, via code cards.
    Amazon already sells XBOX digital codes and Walmart sells code cards.
    Best Buy carries both.
    Plenty other smaller shops.

    That's why MS isn't in court along Sony over digital sales.

    Mind you, I'm not in favor of a diskless high end XBOX (the disk only costs them $10) but it's not the end of the world.
    Reply
  • Dush Ku
    But you are still inputting those codes into the ms store
    Reply
  • fjtorres5591
    Dush Ku said:
    But you are still inputting those codes into the ms store
    And?
    They have to be authenticated as real codes somewhere.
    The codes come from the XBOX servers and go to retaiers at a discount, just like disks.

    A while back some software used built-in code authenticators based on a single algorithm per product--hackers analyzed the software and created code generators for piracy. The modern answer is keep authentication separate from the product using a consumer device-specific hardware code so the server authenticates the user account and the download authenticates the hardware.
    Works for phones, tablets, ebook readers, PCs. And allows infinite downloads for the account, even if the hardware dies.

    It balances consumer needs with vendor security.
    It's not perfect but its the best approach so far.
    Reply
  • Dush Ku
    But there could be a competing company's digital store available to buy from or authenticate to on the xbox
    Reply