ID@Xbox has generated over $2.5 billion in revenue for indie developers

Id Xbox March
Id Xbox March (Image credit: Microsoft)

What you need to know

  • Microsoft shared several new milestones for the ID@Xbox program on Thursday.
  • Microsoft states that the program has paid out over $2.5 billion in revenue for indie developers.
  • Microsoft also recently announced the ID@Azure program.

Microsoft shared a recap of the ID@Xbox program's history on Thursday, with some major milestones and updates on how far the program has come since its launch in 2013.

According to Microsoft (via Xbox Wire (opens in new tab)), the ID@Xbox program has paid out over $2.5 billion in revenue for indie developers since its creation. The last milestone for the program was $500 million paid out back in 2017, meaning an additional $2 billion was paid in the last five years.

Other interesting stats include how the program now encompasses over 4,600 developers across 94 countries. Microsoft has also seen success with some ID@Xbox games launching directly into Xbox Game Pass. Microsoft claims that the average Xbox Game Pass subscriber plays 40% more games compared to someone that isn't subscribed. Microsoft's recent ID@Xbox showcase highlighted some of the recent games coming through the program, including Shredders, Tunic and Trek to Yomi.

Microsoft is expanding support for indie developers through the recently announced ID@Azure program, allowing developers across multiple platforms to utilize cloud technology.

Samuel Tolbert is a freelance writer covering gaming news, previews, reviews, interviews and different aspects of the gaming industry, specifically focusing on Xbox and PC gaming on Windows Central. You can find him on Twitter @SamuelTolbert.

3 Comments
  • Holy cow. 2 billion in 5 years? I thought Game Pass was going to destroy the industry? It sure sounds like it is paying off for some.
  • Anecdotal, perhaps, but every indie developers I personally know loves Game Pass.
  • That does sound like a lot of money. A few hundred million a year. Remember, these are small companies without much need for big capital (unlike, say, a genetics company or something that might need really expensive equipment). I wonder how it compares to other programs by companies to encourage indy app development.