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Microsoft's new mission statement revealed in email, will 'make some tough choices'

One week after Microsoft announced some major changes in its executive ranks and structure, its CEO Satya Nadella has sent out an internal email to its 118,000 employees. The email reveals a new mission statement for the company, but Nadella also warns that Microsoft will "make some tough choices in areas where things are not working."

GeekWire obtained a copy of the internal email from Nadella, which Microsoft is electing not to release publicly. Nadella reveals the company's new mission statement in the first part of the email:

"Every great company has an enduring mission. Our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. I'm proud to share that this is our new official mission statement. This mission is ambitious and at the core of what our customers deeply care about. We have unique capability in harmonizing the needs of both individuals and organizations. This is in our DNA. We also deeply care about taking things global and making a difference in lives and organizations in all corners of the planet."

At the end of the email, Nadella writes about his goals for Microsoft:

"I believe that culture is not static. It evolves every day based on the behaviors of everyone in the organization. We are in an incredible position to seize new growth this year. We will need to innovate in new areas, execute against our plans, make some tough choices in areas where things are not working and solve hard problems in ways that drive customer value. I really do believe that we can achieve magical things when we come together as one team and focus. I'm looking forward to what we can achieve together in FY16."

It's possible the mention of "some tough choices in areas where things are not working" could be in reference to upcoming financial write-offs when Microsoft begins its 2016 fiscal year on July 1. The full text of Nadella's email is below:

Team,

I believe that we can do magical things when we come together with a shared mission, clear strategy, and a culture that brings out the best in us individually and collectively. Last week I shared how we are aligning our structure to our strategy. Today, I want to share more on the overall context and connective tissue between our mission, worldview, strategy and culture. It is critical that we start the new fiscal year with this shared vision on what we can do and who we want to become.

Mission. Every great company has an enduring mission. Our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. I'm proud to share that this is our new official mission statement. This mission is ambitious and at the core of what our customers deeply care about. We have unique capability in harmonizing the needs of both individuals and organizations. This is in our DNA. We also deeply care about taking things global and making a difference in lives and organizations in all corners of the planet.

Worldview. We must always ground our mission in both the world in which we live and the future we strive to create. Today, we live in a mobile-first, cloud-first world, and the transformation we are driving across our businesses is designed to enable Microsoft and our customers to thrive in this world. It's important to note that our worldview for mobile-first is not just about the mobility of devices; it's centered on the mobility of experiences that, in turn, are orchestrated by the cloud. That is why we think of these two trends together. What we do with our products and business models has to account for this fundamental transformation.

Strategy and ambitions. Our strategy is to build best-in-class platforms and productivity services for a mobile-first, cloud-first world. Our platforms will harmonize the interests of end users, developers and IT better than any competing ecosystem or platform. We will realize our mission and strategy by investing in three interconnected and bold ambitions.

  1. Reinvent productivity and business processes
  2. Build the intelligent cloud platform
  3. Create more personal computing

These ambitions utilize a unique set of assets that span productivity services, cloud platform, our device platform and our family of devices. There is an explicit path dependence on how we achieve the "inter-connectedness" between the various elements of our strategy to gain momentum.

· First, we will reinvent productivity services for digital work that span all devices. We will also extend our experience footprint by building more business process experiences, integrated into content authoring and consumption, communication and collaboration tools. We will drive scale and usage by appealing to "dual-use" customers, providing productivity services that enable them to accomplish more at work and in the rest of their life activities with other people.

· Second, all these experiences will be powered by our cloud platform – a cloud that provides our customers faster time to value, improved agility and cost reduction, and solutions that differentiate their business. We'll further provide a powerful extensibility model that is attractive to third-party developers and enterprises. This in turn enables us to attract applications to our cloud platform and attach our differentiated capabilities such as identity management, rich data management, machine learning and advanced analytics.

· Finally, we will build the best instantiation of this vision through our Windows device platform and our devices, which will serve to delight our customers, increase distribution of our services, drive gross margin, enable fundamentally new product categories, and generate opportunity for the Windows ecosystem more broadly. We will pursue our gaming ambition as part of this broader vision for Windows and increase its appeal to consumers. We will bring together Xbox Live and our first-party gaming efforts across PC, console, mobile and new categories like HoloLens into one integrated play.

Strength across all the ambitions enables us to deliver high value to our customers while providing us with the ability to differentiate ourselves from our competitors.

Culture. Perhaps the most important driver of success is culture. Over the past year, we've challenged ourselves to think about our core mission, our soul — what would be lost if we disappeared. That work resulted in the mission, strategy and ambitions articulated above. However, we also asked ourselves, what culture do we want to foster that will enable us to achieve these goals?

We fundamentally believe that we need a culture founded in a growth mindset. It starts with a belief that everyone can grow and develop; that potential is nurtured, not predetermined; and that anyone can change their mindset. Leadership is about bringing out the best in people, where everyone is bringing their A game and finding deep meaning in their work. We need to be always learning and insatiably curious. We need to be willing to lean in to uncertainty, take risks and move quickly when we make mistakes, recognizing failure happens along the way to mastery. And we need to be open to the ideas of others, where the success of others does not diminish our own.

We have the opportunity to exercise our growth mindset every day in three distinct areas:

· Customer-obsessed. We will learn about our customers and their businesses with a beginner's mind and then bring solutions that meet their needs. We will be insatiable in our desire to learn from the outside and bring that knowledge into Microsoft, while still innovating to surprise and delight our users.

· Diverse and inclusive. The world is diverse. We will better serve everyone on the planet by representing everyone on the planet. We will be open to learning our own biases and changing our behaviors so we can tap into the collective power of everyone at Microsoft. We don't just value differences, we seek them out, we invite them in. And as a result, our ideas are better, our products are better and our customers are better served.

· One Microsoft. We are a family of individuals united by a single, shared mission. It's our ability to work together that makes our dreams believable and, ultimately, achievable. We will build on the ideas of others and collaborate across boundaries to bring the best of Microsoft to our customers as one. We are proud to be part of team Microsoft.

If we do all of this, we will achieve our mission to empower every person and organization on the planet. Beyond that, we will make a difference and find deep meaning in our work. We stand in awe of what humans dare to achieve, and we are motivated every day to empower others to achieve more through our technology and innovation.

When we come together as a team, with our exceptional talent and the mindset of a learner, we will grow as individuals, we will grow as a team, we will grow with our customers and partners, we will grow our opportunity, and we will grow our business going forward. And, ultimately, we will grow the impact we have in the world.

We've already started this evolution with things like OneWeek and Hackathon, customer feedback loops, our focus on usage in the engineering teams, our performance review model, as well as our diversity and inclusion efforts including the new unconscious bias training. We will do more and more to support the culture we have and recognize impact when we see it.

A good example of our culture in action right now is the work around Windows. We have approached Windows 10 with a growth mindset and obsession for our customers. We have the opportunity to connect with 1.5 billion Windows customers in 190 countries around the globe. We aspire to move people from needing Windows to choosing Windows to loving Windows. … Certainly we want to upgrade as many of our current Windows 7 and 8.1 customers to Windows 10 as possible through our free upgrade offer. More than that, though, we see this as an opportunity to support and celebrate how people and communities upgrade their world every day. To that end, starting on July 29 when Windows 10 becomes available, employees are invited to volunteer some time and upgrade their communities as part of the broader movement. More details will be available in the coming weeks — our hope is that not only our employees, but customers and partners as well, will get involved and be inspired. Together, we can make a big difference in our world.

I believe that culture is not static. It evolves every day based on the behaviors of everyone in the organization. We are in an incredible position to seize new growth this year. We will need to innovate in new areas, execute against our plans, make some tough choices in areas where things are not working and solve hard problems in ways that drive customer value. I really do believe that we can achieve magical things when we come together as one team and focus. I'm looking forward to what we can achieve together in FY16.

Satya

Source: GeekWire

350 Comments
  • Lets hope nothing related to windows phone.
  • I doubt they would kill Windows Phone before seeing what effect Windows 10 Mobile and any new flagships have on the market.
  • I dont know. We expected stuff to change with Windows 8 after they left the Windows 7 people behind on mobile.
  • Yes they left WIndows phone 7, user got mad, and that's the mistake they'll never repeat.
  • On an insider tip, WP isn't going anywhere!
  • "We also deeply care about taking things global and making a difference in lives and organizations in all corners of the planet." LOL Nadella, comedy genius. Its lack of global penetration that makes many people irate in these here comments sections. No Xbox Music service. Bing rewards, USA only? Come on, they aren't always global.
  • I thought the joke was that the planet doesn't have corners because it's round (ish).
  • Both Xbox Music and Bing Rewards are very small services. I can't speak for Microsoft, but I understand why they aren't global.
  • +735 I don't understand why Google and Apple have many services here in Latin America, but Microsoft not.
  • Don't forget Cortana..... There are more chances of experiencing Cortana in your region using iOS/Android than staying on Windows/WP
  • Thats a complex reply. You meant "not going to change" (and I hope it does evolve) or the opposite? :-P
  • An insider tip, yeah? Anything else you can tell us about that?
  • They just did repeat it with windows RT not getting windows 10
  • I still believe that Windows RT users wil get some form of Windows 10 Mobile adapted to the 10 inch screensize of the Surface RT and Surface 2. That all the fuzz is for nothing. Windows RT users wil lose there desktop enviourment, but would still be able to buy Windows Store apps and do all the things the now do.  
  • They have already said that they are not upgrading RT to Win10... They will get some W10 functionality, but I doubt it would be the ability to run W10 Universal apps
  • Why not? It should be possible. Becouse both OS's share the same core (Something that wasn't the case with WP7) So there is no reason to think it would not be possible to use universal apps on Surface RT and 2.
  • Those are the tough choices that have to be made.  Pissing off the minority in order to get an edge with the majority.  Windows 10 is trying to get around that by giving options.  But things like hamburger menu for example, that's not going away.  It's a tough choice for them.  Then there's the fact that 512mb devices are likely going to have very little support as the future moves forward.  People will need to upgrade for additional features. Sure MS makes a lot off other mobile platforms but they could make that much more if people are selling apps in their store. This is not something they will give up on.  The tough choices will simply be those that leave certain users in the dust.
  • I don't think Microsoft CEO's focus is so granular. If he makes a decision it will be about devices or mobile as a whole not about 512mb devices or hamburger menues, there are other people to focus on those
  • Actually, Microsoft left their customers behind on Windows Mobile, THEN on WinPhone 7, so their track record is that they talk a good game about mobile but abandon their customers without much concern. Not a good idea to wrote a memo that sounds like subverting Basket would have written just before killing WinMo.
  • Come on man people get new phones after 2-3 years, new features making it to old hardware is uncommon in the tech industry
  • Also, before that, they abandoned a lot of Windows XP users with the launch of Vista with its high minimum requirements. I was one of those. Then I got myself a Lumia 800 and got abandoned when Windows Phone 7.8 & Windows Phone 8 came out. So they got me twice now, so far.
  • But that was after they left behind WIndows Mobile 6.5 users. So....
  • I feel like Windows 10 is what we wanted Windows Phone 8 to be.   We wanted all of the work on Windows to translate into Windows Phone Apps.  Very little of that has happened.    Now that Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile are literally running the same apps and we're seeing the benefits of that (Mail getting updated regularly in the previews, even OS level build numbers starting to sync up) it does seem like Microsoft is writing once and deploying to multiple platforms.    We're finally to a place that when Music gets attention on the desktop, Music on the Windows Mobile gets attention within a day or two. So if that applies to the broader market that will be huge.   With Windows 10 if they can just, hope against hope, get people to upgrade then there will be a large incentive to develop apps for Win10 desktop and by extension Win10 Mobile.
  • There's nothing to kill.  The platform is as good as dead. They need to decide if they want to try again.  The current effort is simply a failure.
  • Can always rely on I'm TC to talk absolute twaddle    
  • When I read posts from you, I read your name as I'm XTC. Well, most of your comments are. LOL.
  • Yes, but it sounds like it could be on table.
  • theyre probably gonna sell off xbox or windows phone
  • Hope WP does and not Xbox.
  • Seems it is a decent success overseas - hopefully they will look at that as part of their new "everyone" mission and keep it alive. 
  • Whats the use of giving devics everywhere but the Apps/Services that empower them to be US/UK only...
  • Windows Phone is a massive success over here in France. I was proud of being a very early adopter with my good old LG Optimus 7, back in 2011, and I never saw ANYONE with a windows phone 7 device, but since wp8.1, I'm seeing some everywhere. Just in my class, out of 32, there are 4 windows phones. (Lumia 830, 1020, 930, 1320), and I have seen quite a lot of people with Lumias in the road, the underground, etc... It's only in the US that Windows Phone is a failure. I'm really confident that WM10 will be a success in Europe. Dunno about the states.
  • "It's only in the US that Windows Phone is a failure." You're forgetting China, which I believe is the biggest smartphone market in the world where Windows Phone is irrelevant. China is probably the biggest dent in WP's marketshare.
  • If WP dies, I'll go back to string and cans.
  • I honestly couldn't tell you which OS id switch to is WP was to shut down. Hate to say it but I'm probably leaning 51% toward iOS and I hate Apple.
  • Same here, though I would also consider BB as an option too.
  • If I had to switch now, probably I would choose Ubuntu Phone!
    I like challenges
  • I just couldn't do Apple. Everytime I have to do something on a friends iPhone or iPad, I hate it. Just my personal opinion, but something about the OS just does not jive with me. So I would switch to Android, but I hope I never have to...
  • I'd honestly just switch to legacy phones. I'll never touch iOS or Android, even if they're the only two choices.
  • wouldn't that suck? TWO choices for what kind of smartphone you want and one of the choices only offers one same damn model and iteration for the past 8 years. If that's any indication of a future with only 2 smart phone operating systems, what a stagnant future it will be. its 2015, when we enter 2020 we should have at least 4 contending operating systems. It blows really, and its all down to app support for most upcoming mobile OS's look at Microsoft still struggling for app parity and they're a multibillion dollar company that can afford to bleed. Imagine Firefox, Sailfish, Fire OS, look how RIM couldn't withstand it anymore. And every android and iOS fan cheers at a failed attempt from one of the few at the bottom like its a long term victory.
  • My honest opinion and being around a ton of non techie smartphone owners, MOST iOS and Android users don't even know other OS exist and that is one of WP (W10 for mobile) major problems. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • That's something only a hardcore fanboy would say. 
  •  I have an old Samsung black jack 2. It was slow and wound up getting an iPhone 3. I am satisfied with its functionality, but I have always wanted a windows phone that worked in sync with my WinOS. Basically, I've been waiting for a very long time for an MS Windows phone that is current to today's demands I require. So waiting has been my issue. Hoping to sell this iP5s soon! What I did do to dim my wait time was to buy a Micrsoft SP2 tablet. I am VERY happy with this MS tablet!!!!      
  • On a philosophical level I agree with you 100%. When it comes down to how I enjoy my phone, It's Android...as much as I HATE Google. Currently though, I can get around 95% of Google crap on my phone. What I *can* have is a pretty decent Windows Phone 8.1  style launcher and all my Microsoft services. It takes some work, but it is almost seamless. I also get access to ALL apps. I have become very frustrated of late. I tried Android in the past but came back to WP. I have completely lost my patience with the lack of apps. There are apps I NEED to make certain products I use fully functional. Purely from a very selfish perspective, I'd love for Microsoft to build a great Windows 10 Android Launcher to go with all the fully supported and fully functional apps and services they are now supporting on the other platforms. Have there be some extra functionality when Microsoft services are tied in with the launcher. That would be the ultimate trojan horse.
  • I agree. Often when I'm using my phone I feel like I might be actually missing out on something great everyone sees in iOS. Then, I find myself in a situation of having to use my friend's phone, or iPad. And I'm always surprised by what a mess it is. (Except when I open an app like Facebook and I'm like, "oh my god, look at all the features this app has! My Facebook app can't do any of this!" But, you know, I keep those thoughts to myself.) If I have to switch it'll be Android, and Material Design is pretty nice now. I'd hate to have to use anything that supports Google though. Ugh.
  • There is no way on gods green earth that I would ever use any device created by Google or for a product that uses a Google OS. I would however strongly resist kicking and screaming toward Apple, but I wouldn't like one second of it.
  • Honestly, I'd go Ubuntu. Anything but Google or Apple!
  • Where would you get this Ubuntu phone. Posted via the Windows Central App on my Lumia 640 XL
  • You would go iOS. I think iOS stinks, yet I'm using the 6 for reasons of transferring to T-Mo and needing to buy a phone for the ETF reimbursement. Also, don't use SIM card adapters, because that broke my L920 and I'm stuck on the 6. Anyways, iOS because Android has so many security issue reports and it was made by Google.
  • Apple's a great choice if you're someone who would have loved Germany or Russia in the 40s and 50s. 
  • Maybe so, but Android/Google is for people who think Orwells', "1984" would be a great place to live. 
  • Germany and Russia had access to the absolute best apps and games in the 40's and 50's? Wow
  • Easier for me. I'm Canadian and will support my fellow countrymen at Blackberry, Inc. if Windows Mobile/Phone will end. It wouldn't be that bad either as I have once invested in a few apps at the Amazon Appstore before switching to Windows. Otherwise, I think I will go with Apple too. Android is the ultimate last resort.
  • I know... I hate apple... but android bah! Never! I'd rather go for a BB phone... I think
  • Go back? You've actually used this method before?
  • Funny because I've thought about that thought several times and I still don't see me going to either. I switched from Android to get the Lumia 920,and I still use an iPad in addition to my Windows devices every day and I hate IOS. If fact,I posted my dislike for it as a Facebook status earlier. Guess I'd just be screwed.
  • I'd just use my Windows Phones until they fall apart. Like hell I'm using iOS or Android, and if Windows Phone dies Blackberry won't be far behind.
  • Nope wp is not dying just released new insider build for phones.  
  • Yeah, you'd think they would just silently stop development of Windows 10 Mobile until the announcement. After all, the people in charge (Terry, Joe, Gabe etc.) would certainly know by now if Windows 10 Mobile was to be cancelled. Theoretically this doesn't discount the possibility of cancelling phone production, though. However, I don't really see that happening, since it doesn't fit the strategy they've only just begun with Windows 10. Things I COULD see happening, though, are: Writing off the phone division acquired by Nokia and moving phone design and production over to the Surface team instead or simply lay-offs in the phone division.
  • Surface and Phone design are already within the same Windows and Devices department, if I remember the news correctly from earlier.
  • <p><br />
    &nbsp;</p> <p>
    koolyoyo6
    Exactly my thoughts with a small difference ... first I will try Jolla (Sailfish) and dan Blackberry.</p>
  • I think it may relate to stuff like Xbox Music, Xbox Video which haven't been particularly successful compared to the competition...
  • Then they need to find a strong partner to fill those gaps. That is core to the home. I don't think they would kill those, personally. Video more so than music. Though I love my music sub.
  • I think we'll see a rebrand of Xbox Music to Microsoft Music. So Video, along with TV & Movie will just live in the universal store as they should, with options to buy individual seasons or episodes or films.
  • Those services will probably stay as they were integrated into the W10 store, and it can't be too much work for them to maintain it.
  • "which haven't been particularly successful compared to the competition" Unfortunately WP also clearly fits that criteria.
  • I think they're making the hard decision to kill the start menu. They're finally seeing that it really is unneeded.
  • Something is written-off when its recognized value is reduced. In accounting, this is a recognition of the reduced or zero value of an asset. In income tax statements, this is a reduction of taxable income as recognition of certain expenses required to produce the income
  • I doubt they'd kill Windows Phone when everything is coming together now. We got a shitton of new partners. which mostly make budget phones but thats how android rose to dominance too. Windows 10 is going to be bomb. Even on phones. (Know that there are a lot more features coming).
  • That is what was said about Windows Phone 7, then 7.5, then 8, then 8.1 and now Windows Mobile 10. The differences between all these versions are negligible at best and Windows 10 certainly doesn't bring the evolutionary change that needed to become successful in mobile. They will release Windows Mobile 10 and then slowly move away from mobile devices and concentrate on services. It will get minimal support going forward. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • You make some valid points, but I just have to say that it's Windows 10 mobile. :)
  • If you read his email, it's not about killing products, it's about better utilizing them.  Nothing to worry about here.
  • I doubt Windows Phone is in danger. Note Nadella's paragraph that leads into how he plans to execute this new this new strategy and ambitions: Our strategy is to build best-in-class platforms and productivity services for a mobile-first, cloud-first world. He then makes the following point: "These ambitions utilize a unique set of assets that span productivity services, cloud platform, our device platform and our family of devices. There is an explicit path dependence on how we achieve the "inter-connectedness" between the various elements of our strategy to gain momentum." That statement which highlights Microsoft's assets for achieving this goal of inter-connectnses, draws our attention to the assets  of family of devices that have been at the forefront of this One Windows Unified platform message and core to to the unified platform "story" for some time now. It is consistent with what we have seen thus far of the universal platform that spans device such PC, tablet, phone, IoT and Hololens. The tone of that above quote seems to maintain the integrity of the current range of that family of devices (and as the memo proceeds actually adds to it by restating past quotes regarding new categories.)  I think Windows Phone security as part of Microsofts plan to is further their ecosystem of products and services can be found in Nadella's next quote: "Finally, we will build the best instantiation of this vision through our Windows device platform and our devices, which will serve to delight our customers, increase distribution of our services, drive gross margin, enable fundamentally new product categories, and generate opportunity for the Windows ecosystem more broadly. We will pursue our gaming ambition as part of this broader vision for Windows and increase its appeal to consumers. We will bring together Xbox Live and our first-party gaming efforts across PC, console, mobile and new categories like HoloLens into one integrated play." First he opens with a broad focus on "Windows device platform and our devices." Note in this quote devices are key to the proliferation of Microsoft's services. And he notes"our" devices which makes clear that though cross-platform efforts are central to Microsoft's strategy, the utilization of it's own devices to distribute Microsoft services are also central to their strategy.  Of course Microsoft has a range of devices of which Windows Phone is only a part. But Nadella at the end of the above quote as he is talking about how MS will advance it's gaming ambition as part of "this" (he keeps the gaming dialouge within the previously established context of MS devices), actually lists the types of MS devices that that gaming strategy will be advanced across: ...PC, console, mobile and new categories like HoloLens... Note mobile is mentioned as part of Microsoft future plans. As we know Microsoft's Windows Mobile SKU comprises both phone and small tablets less than 8 inches. Microsoft doesn't (yet) make it's own small tablet that is less than 8 inches but it does make it own mobile phones (Lumia). So this statement clearly indicates that Microsoft's Windows Phone devices are still part of part of Microsoft's vision.  This along with a clear strategy regarding Microsoft's Smarphone strategy (as we've been discussing through a series here at WC), is something that MS has greatly invested in, actually show that MS is (at least for now) all in with Windows Phone! :-)   
  • Exactly. Windows Phone is just starting to pick up. Didn't you guys read the news about WP in Russia? They can't possibly kill it off now.
  • It doesn't make them any money, so they most certainly can and, when W10M is a failure (and it will be) they very likely will.
  • It barely loses money though, 1 year in with no flagships.
  • Windows Phone is always just starting to pick up. 
  • And then Microsoft does something to kill momentum. I'd love to get a better insight into the internal battles at MS to see who's really for and who's against WP. Just so I know who to blame for not backing the platform I spent good money buying into.
  • Interesting how they plan to drive gross margin in devices. Easier said than done. But as they say: 'After all is said and done more is said than done'
  • @Jason Ward:
    If the topic wasn't too serious for me, I would find it funny how you painfully try to turn phrases and squeeze words just to find any positive hint in his statement.
    I for one find it very remarkable how Nadella avoids the word "phone" consistently.
    Phasing the term "phone" out in their communication and the lay-offs of Elop and Harlow are clear indications for me that Microsoft's leadership team is preparing their business for a future without phone devices.
    You said they won't drop phones, because they invested greatly. But that just underlines my point, that the "tough choices" line refers to dropping the phone division.
    And by the way: Nadella was never "all in" on the phone division.
    Let's look at this again in two years time, although I won't be happy about the development of the situation, when I will say: "I told you so.".
  • @WindowsPhoenix These discussions are always great. Different perspectives help us to see things from other angles so thanks for your input. One of the things I've realized in analyzing these type of corporate memos is that whether from Nadella, Elop, Ballmer etc is that they are intentionally broad in scope and lack a certain level of specifics that later communications, sometimes after things become more obvious, begin to lay out. So wbat I do is not necessarily "turn phrases or squeeze words" :-) as you say. I look at what's not said in the context of things that HAVE been said, maybe in other settings, things that have been done that position the company strategically at this point, plans that are in motion, and roadmaps that have been revealed. As I shared in one of my pieces, corporate changes of this magnitude(and product releases) in the tech industry happen at a much slower pace than what it appears to what is perceived. By the time the information, such as that revealed in this memo became public, Microsofts plan and strategy has already been in action. This is just the public announcement of a course of action that has already been initiated some time ago. With that in mind, as we look at the strategy of the One Microsoft reorg that centralized engineering talent around a single vision, a unified platform for which phone is a key part, universal apps, the creating of the Mobile division that includes phone, the reality that at least two new high end Lumias will be released this year, the fact that 90% of all Windows Phone are Lumias, the investment in Continuum, the tools for porting iOS and Android apps to the Universal Windows platform, the focus on the phone strategy as recently as Build, the consistent releases of new Windows 10 preview builds etc, all show a commitment Microsoft has to its mobile platform. Again Microsofts Lumia makes up 90% of the Windows phone market, and again this announcement is a course of action that began long before it was read about here at WC or elsewhere. This plan has been concurrent with Microsoft mobile strategy that we have been watching unfold over time. Nadella's obvious not using "phone" in his wording is interesting but as the CEO making broad statements to all employees and divisions beneath him his wording of "mobile" which includes phone is an appropriate term especially considering that this is an internal email to his staff. Now I don't have a crystal ball, and you may indeed be right and may end up saying "I told you so." If so with a smile, ill say I guess you were right:-) I however think that this memo does not stand alone and within the context of the bigger picture of things we know, see and MS position in the industry with Windows 10 and investments that have not yet had an opportunity to fail OR succeed(porting rival apps, universal Win10 apps, etc) I think if there's going to be hand writing on the wall, it hasn't gotten there yet. I believe all evidence shows tbier moving forward with Windows Phone devices and are committed to making the market via the Nokia purchase, for windows phone as they've commutes to. Lets watch and see.
  • I don't think it will mean anything to Windows Phone as a SOFTWARE SERVICE. But I think we both know that you'll probably kiss your Microsoft Mobile Lumias goodbye sooner than later. As Microsoft moves back to where it belongs - amongs software - they'll push for their partners to do the hardware, including Windows Phone. They'll probably offer the mobile version as something OEMs can start bundling with their PCs. For example, Asus can create new machines that bring with them a Windows phone. The consumer then buys the PC and gets a phone with it that is able to carry part of the PC experience with it if needed be (Continuum). It's particularly appealing for the enterprise.
  • That's my fear, that their purchase of Nokia devices is not going to be towards converting Microsoft in a company like Apple which builds hardware and software, and more as some analysts say that Microsoft is becoming more a software company as it was in the Steve Ballmer's era. I'm really sad to hear Apple is the only American company that builds flagship phones, in Korea both LG and Samsung build top end devices, in the PC industry both HP and Dell sell high end computers in the US. So why can't Microsoft be more like Apple and less than Google, I don't know, I'm not sure if obscure forces are telling Nadella in his subconcious mind that the purchase of Nokia hardware division doesn't mean something spectacular. But I may be wrong, only time will tell.
  • Already they have failed, Microsoft haven't even paid attention in markets where can get profits,ie to Latinoamérica has Microsoft very abandoned, also is June and already my phone isn't with the latest update today receive an email saying get ready to 10 and that should have Lumia denim for Windows mobile 10 but it's a bad joke this e mail, since many devices aren't even updated on the latest upgrade in Chile, also how they expect sell more devices if they have not an authorized dealer here and the companies, doesn't even have on sale the Lumia 830/640 and better don't talk about flagships there is just two 1520/930 already they failed in the mobile part
  • @DJCBS:
    Sadly, that is definitely a possibility right now.
    Although that would be awful. Because Microsoft might be known primarily for software, but they seem to have great expertise in the hardware field as well. Whenever they develop hardware, they deliver high quality products (PC peripherals, Xbox, Surface).
  • Pretty sure this is the only 8 billion dollar write off he could be alluding to
  • Man...that would be devastating!!!
  • I think he was just generally speaking ...if things aren't going well, you always have to make 'tough' choices. That can be said about anything. 
  • They warned in last quarter's financial statement that there may be a massive write-off coming. Given that I think this is more than just "generally speaking."   http://www.windowscentral.com/microsoft-warns-possible-and-massive-futur...
  • I fear its kinda obvious that the "bad news" is windows phone related. It's the only thing that they havent really been clear about. I think it's Android related, mostly in terms of apps and stuff like that. I mean, why else would they make WP/W10M look and feel soo much like Android. Has to be something about that. Just dunno what.
  • They're working too hard on the mobile OS to nix it, I would be more concerned they're pulling the plug on flagship phones.
  • Working Too Hard... or Hardly Working
  • That would be silly in a Mobile first, Cloud first world.
  • Another series of lay offs
  • They should start with the CEO. No one is going to read this as it is too long and he starts with the use of the infamous Steve Jobs word "magical." Dump this guy now.
  • Those aren't very concrete arguments for removing the head of a company as important as Microsoft.
    ----
    The letter wouldn't just read, "Hey guys, WAZAAAAAAAA". Also, you're not the target demographic for this letter. It's for his employees.
  • And "connective tissue" regarding mission and alignment....
  • I'd start with the Skype team, and get some people with a clear plan who know what they're doing, and how to execute it in there instead.
  • I read it. I'm guessing my Xbox music service is on the block, but this guy needs to be given a chance. It's a colossal task to turn around a company as big and as embedded in their old ways as Microsoft. I'm sure some of these decisions will piss me off as I use a lot of their products and services and am probably more emotionally attached than I should be. I figure if I can give this guy a chance, anyone can.
  • Look a squirrel!
  • Layman question...what really does a write off imply...? Worst case scenario, lets assume that he's talking about the phone division...what happens to it after a write off? Is it just a tax reduction move by accepting that an acquired division isn't actually making money...or is it something far more than that?
  • Kramer : It's just a write off for them . Jerry : How is it a write off ? Kramer : They just write it off . Jerry : Write it off what ? Kramer : Jerry all these big companies they write off everything Jerry : You don't even know what a write off is . Kramer : Do you ? Jerry : No . I don't . Kramer : But they do and they are the ones writing it off . Jerry : I wish I just had the last twenty seconds of my life back .
  • Thank you
  • Is that actually from a Seinfeld episode?
  • yes it is
  • Hahahahah brilliant!
  • Awesome - Which episode is this for bonus points.
  • Season 8 – Episode 5 - The Package
  • Hats off to you bro :D
  • Lol perfect. I hadn't seen that episode in a while
  • ROFL
  • Wow, I can so hear them saying it, hilarious!
  • Lol Posted via the Windows Central App for Android