Dirac on Fujitsu

Swedish audio brand Dirac has worked with several Android manufacturers in the past to offer tailor-made audio solutions on their devices, and the company is now doing the same in the PC market. Dirac is teaming up with Fujitsu to bring its sound optimization tech to the ESPRIMO FH70/D1 and FH77/D1.

Dirac has done a remarkable job in the smartphone space, where it optimized the performance of small and micro-speakers to deliver richer and clearer sound. Its latest solution — dubbed Dirac Bass — is aimed to deliver better bass from phone speakers. Dirac's audio tech has been a mainstay on Xiaomi and OPPO phones over the last three years, and the brand is now looking to translate that experience to PCs.

From Dirac's General Manager of Mobile Erik Rudolphi:

At Dirac, we don't chase new markets; we focus on inventing the future of sound and understand that by developing truly pioneering digital audio solutions new markets will open to us.

That was as true of the luxury automotive market, from which we were born, as the PC market, where we venture next. The desktop and laptop are increasingly used for gaming and video streaming, and customers are now demanding a high quality audio experience that's on-par with its visual display. We're excited to enter the PC market and establish our solutions as the foundation for a new generation of PC audio.

Dirac is envisaging that its custom audio optimization tech will enable a "new calibre of PC audio" for use cases like gaming and multimedia:

Dirac has dedicated the last 7 years to pioneering digital audio algorithms that allow small and micro-speakers to deliver big sound, of high quality, despite their inherently small size. We've collaborated with the industry's most respected speaker OEMs and smartphone brands to establish a new standard in smartphone audio.

Now, as we break into the PC market, we will lean on this extensive experience and expertise to deliver the industry an entirely new calibre of PC audio that will add a new dimension to gaming, movies, video-conferencing, and more.