Garmin M20 Sighted at 2009 CTIA

With all the excitement about the HTC Snap and Samsung Propel, there are a few more devices making an appearance at the 2009 CTIA. One such phone is the Garmin M20 Nuvifone. It first surfaced at the 2009 Mobile World Congress and made a positive first impression. It is still on track for a late summer release and it will be fun to take this new Windows Mobile phone out for a test drive.

Unwiredview.com was able to get a little hands on time with the M20 during the 2009 CTIA and appears to be equally impressed. The M20 is a GPS enabled Windows Mobile phone that sports a 2.8" VGA touchscreen along with features not uncommon to your average Windows Mobile phone (wifi, bluetooth, 3.0mp camera, etc.). What makes the M20 "not your average Windows Mobile phone" is the GPS. As I understand it, the M20's GPS is a true GPS unit, not aGPS, which means the GPS functionality is not dependent on the cell phone signal. So, if your out hiking and loose your signal, have no fear the M20 will still get you back to civilization.

Follow the break for a hands on video of the Garmin M20.

Phil Nickinson

Phil is the father of two beautiful girls and is the Dad behind Modern Dad. Before that he spent seven years at the helm of Android Central. Before that he spent a decade in a newsroom of a two-time Pulitzer Prize-finalist newspaper. Before that — well, we don't talk much about those days. Subscribe to the Modern Dad newsletter!

8 Comments
  • "As I understand it, the M20's GPS is a true GPS unit, not aGPS, which means the GPS functionality is not dependent on the cell phone signal. So, if your out hiking and loose your signal, have no fear the M20 will still get you back to civilization."
    Hmmm lol no..
    I suggest you do some little research about aGPS before posting wrong statements like that.. (and also look at the specs of this device compared to 90% of the WM phones...yes it's the same MSM7200a chipset...same aGPS..)
  • yea what thing about aGPS is wrong
  • Everything I've read about the M20 is that the GPS functionality is not dependent on the cellular signal, which is a key element of aGPS, right? And you are correct, that the M20 has the Qualcomm MSM7200a 528mhz processor. Just like many other WM phones.
  • While a lot of people believe that Assisted GPS is no "true" GPS because it depends on a cellular network, that is actually wrong. But it's a fairly widespread misconception, so I wouldn't blame anyone for getting this wrong. ;-) AGPS is just a term for several methods that reduce cold start times. When the GPS receiver starts up, it has to work out where it is. The data it uses for that is transmitted by every GPS satellite, but very slowly (according to Wikipedia, it takes about 40 seconds of uninterrupted visibility to receive the full data). In order to speed up the process, the data can be transmitted over a cellular network (Qualcomm calls this XTRA), which is much faster. It is also possible to use cell tower positioning information to speed up the initial location calculations. If you'd like to know more, read the Wikipedia article about Assisted GPS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS).
  • My understanding is that aGPS uses the cell signal to get a position faster, but will still work without it. The idea is that the cell signal gives you a general location, which the aGPS unit uses to determine what satellites to look for and where. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPS_Phone
  • All of you are correct, there is no difference in the gps from other phones currently on the market. The difference with this and the Pharos models is that the maps are pre-loaded on the device to allow access without depending on a data signal.
  • if anything agps is better then?
  • While a lot of people believe that Assisted GPS is no "true" GPS because it depends on a cellular network, that is actually wrong. But it's a fairly widespread misconception, so I wouldn't blame anyone for getting this wrong. ;-) AGPS is just a term for several methods that reduce cold start times. When the GPS receiver starts up, it has to work out where it is. The data it uses for that is transmitted by every GPS satellite, but very slowly (according to Wikipedia, it takes about 40 seconds of uninterrupted visibility to receive the full data). In order to speed up the process, the data can be transmitted over a cellular network (Qualcomm calls this XTRA), which is much faster. It is also possible to use cell tower positioning information to speed up the initial location calculations. m65 kamagra attorney lawyer scrub