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Google fixes Windows 10 Insider build crashing bug for 64-bit Chrome beta

If you're running the 64-bit version of the Google Chrome beta browser on the latest Windows 10 Insider build, you'll be happy to know that Google has fixed an issue that would cause the browser to crash.

The issue first surfaced in the Chrome Beta for those on Windows 10 build 10525 roughly a week ago. Google first pushed the fix to Chrome Canary, its nightly build channel for the Chrome browser, last week, but it has now made its way to the browser's beta in version 45.0.2454.78.

For some background, the issue causing the crash was due to the use of unauthorized "hooking" to work around Microsoft's APIs. When Microsoft changed how memory is handled, Google's workaround was effectively broken. In Chrome's issue tracker, a member of the team explained Google's decision to stick with its current method after the bug was fixed, but didn't rule out revisiting the decision if there are further impacts to usability:

"I'm going to closing this out for comments, since the specific issue here is fixed and there will be no future work on this bug. For the small number of people asking why Chrome checks signatures on the 64-bit sys call stubs, it's because doing so significantly mitigates issues from third-party software hooking inside Chrome's sandboxed processes. Whereas on 32-bit Windows we're forced to use much more permissive hooking, and as a result we see far more issues due to malfunctioning third-party software such as AV or other utilities that: break ASLR, leak privileged objects, or just introduce general instability that leads to very high crash rates inside our sandboxed processes.""We will continue to track the impact of our 64-bit sys call stub validation, and if we see significant conflicts in the future we can revisit our decision. But for now, our crash report data supports the position that the strict validation is providing a real end-user benefit in terms of stability and security."

And there you have it. If you were experiencing crashes when running the 64-bit version of Chrome on Windows 10 build 10525, the issues should now be resolved.

Thanks to Hughes H. for the tip!

Source: Chrome Issue Tracker

Dan Thorp-Lancaster is the Editor in Chief for Windows Central. He began working with Windows Central as a news writer in 2014 and is obsessed with tech of all sorts. You can follow Dan on Twitter @DthorpL and Instagram @heyitsdtl. Got a hot tip? Send it to daniel.thorp-lancaster@futurenet.com.

47 Comments
  • And I'll never use it....
  • And nobody will ever care Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • How about they use the damn API and use it properly. Good people put lots of work into those APIs. Serves you right Chrome team.
  • No still ain't using it
  • Nobody cares if you use it or not. 
  • It's a reply to @WPenvy, you asshat. I was talking about the "API". Read the whole of comment's thread and try to understand the context of the reply.
  • "Asshat" hahahaha funny ; heard asswipe plenty times though ;)
  • And when Microsoft makes another change to Windows, Chrome will be broken again. Great thnking, Google!
  • Nope. Works on 10525 and today's update too.
  • That's because Microsoft hasn't made another change with the stub. When it does, Chrome will be broken again.
  • We can only hope MS does keep making changes until Google starts using the allocated APIs instead of hacks to make their software work.
  • Am I the only one noticing the accent color on the Store icon?  That has not been there, right?
  • Store just updated itself.
  • This type of circumvention of the published apis illustrates why many consider google apps akin to malware.
  • True that
  • The Cisco Meraki firewalls we use even have a switch under the network security elements that block anything Google with one click of the mouse button ;)
  • This was their priority :P Where would their software run anyway :P
  • Stop using Google chrome guys. Just stop. Windows 10 is a beginning. You'll survive without google products.
  • Nah, I'll still use Chrome and Google on Windows 10, thanks. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Ditto
  • Put a lid on it buddy. Choice. That's what the new Windows and Microsoft is all about.
  • Screw Google and their inferior products. I think it's dumb that people feel the need to rely on Google services when MS offers much better options on Windows.
  • Microsoft not only doesn't offer a browser better than Chrome, it doesn't offer one cross-platform. Deal with reality.
  • Are you shitting me? Doesn't offer a browser better than chrome? Edge is 112% faster than chrome. Check the facts.
  • https://youtu.be/AWUZDPrfOcI 112%? My ass.
  • DJCBS is correct. Chrome, Firefox and Opera work on OS X and Linux too, if we're just considering desktop platforms since this refers to desktop not mobile. Microsoft doesn't have any browsers that support OS X or Linux. Apple doesn't have any browsers that support Windows or Linux. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Couldn't agree more. Use Firefox or Opera if Edge/IE isn't enough - no reason to defile Windows 10 with anything Alphabet ;)
  • No I'll continue to use Google chrome, it is the best browser(still) till date
  • I didn't use chrome even once always used Firefox, and now edge
  • Opera is much better if you have to use a chromium based browser.
  • I agree. Opera is great and I'll be sticking with it until Edge gets extension support
  • I wonder what they keep changing
  • After using both chrome and Microsoft Edge on windows 10, I feel like Edge is making a comeback for MS's Browser. I don't see the point in Chrome anymore since Edge seems just as fast... Or better? (hard to say).
  • No extensions so it sucks.
  • just because it has no extensions and you tell him that it sucks? I tell you, they will ADD it this fall. Still sucks?
  • Aren't they using Google extensions?
  • Chrome, still the best Browser for Windows, it's how ever tab is it's own process, it's so much better than way. People can moan all they like about ram, it's cheap, I bought 32gb of ram for under £200, you can get 8GB of ram for like £40, most people I know have 16GB standard. Who is using 4GB any more? We all had 4GB in 2006, if you're still using 4GB, you were conned. 
  • That's like saying that since gas is now cheap, you should buy a gas guzzler.
  • Yeah, Chrome works great with 32 GB of RAM, but if you have "only 8" then it doesn't. It's the computer's fault.
  • no, it's its bug. Edge can handle it, even also Firefox and Opera.
  • then goodbye to the battery life.
    Edge has it too though in Windows Apps group on Task Manager just showing 1. Their tabs are on a separate process. IE did that first before Edge.
  • You won't get good ram for that piece of trash price, unless its on clearance which 90% of people won't be looking at. I rather have 8gb of super fast ram than 32gb of shit ram.
  • IE 11 is worlds better than Chrome. Chrome seems to cause stability issues on every PC I've ever used. Firefox has had issues as well regarding random crashes and Flash issues but not to the point I had to uninstall it. Can't say the same for Chrome.
  • I happen to be using 4gb in my notebook and as long as win 10 runs good on it that what it gonna continue to have.. Extension support coming for edge o can wait..
  • Your right. I have the 8GB SP3 and was discussing 4 vs 8 with my manager during the week when deciding what to get the user base next and pointed out that only with 2 desktops, about 10 IE and Edge Windows open and another 10 active applications (multiples of Word, Excel, Outlook and other stuff) I was barely using 4GB. Basically the average user will not be burning through 4GB if they avoid Chrome :)
  • Goes to show that if you don't use the APIs properly you're in for trouble. Microsoft is well within their rights to change private APIs as often and as radically as they want, without answering to anyone, and it breaks your code will tough. In fact, you learn this in Programing 101.
  • It's not just the APIs though - HTML5 and other stuff Google doesn't stick to the defined standards.