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Intel is on a Bitcoin 'Bonanza' with its latest reported chip deal

Intel Core i9-12900K
Intel Core i9-12900K (Image credit: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central)

What you need to know

  • Intel will supply Bitcoin startup GRIID with chips designed to mine cryptocurrency more efficiently, according to a recent report.
  • GRIID has reportedly signed a supply agreement with Intel to use the "Bonanza Mine" chips.
  • Intel's Bonanza Mine announcement is said to be on the way in February 2022.

Intel is expected to announce its new Bonanza Mine chips in February 2022. They are said to be able to make mining Bitcoin more energy efficient than the current offerings on the market, allowing companies and individuals to obtain cryptocurrency without having to use as much power. According to an S-4 filing spotted by Fox Business, a Bitcoin mining startup called GRIID will be the first to use Intel's Bonanza Mine processors.

"We have entered into a definitive supply contract with Intel to provide ASICs that we expect to fuel our growth. The initial order will supply units to be delivered in 2022 and GRIID will have access to a significant share of Intel's future production volumes," said GRIID in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (via HotHardware).

Bonanza Mine Chips, also called BZM2 ASICS (application-specific integrated circuits), could increase the profit margins of crypto mining companies such as GRIID. Mining Bitcoin requires a lot of energy, which is increasingly expensive. By lowering the energy required to mine cryptocurrency, GRIID and other companies could significantly lower their costs.

It's expected that Intel will officially announce its Bonanza Mine chips at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in February 2022.

Bitcoin and other forms of cryptocurrency have been under increased scrutiny recently due to their impact on the environment. Russia recently proposed a ban on mining crypto. Reducing the environmental footprint of mining cryptocurrency could help the image of the emerging technology.

Sean Endicott
Sean Endicott

Sean Endicott is the news writer for Windows Central. If it runs Windows, is made by Microsoft, or has anything to do with either, he's on it. Sean's been with Windows Central since 2017 and is also our resident app expert. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com.

1 Comment
  • "Mining Bitcoin requires a lot of energy" That's because crypto currencies are a stupid, stupid idea. It's why crypto values are so volatile, which is the opposite of what you want in a currency. It might as well be the Venezuelan bolivar. Meanwhile, in advanced countries, central banks create and destroy any amount of their national currencies at will in order to keep inflation within target. It costs almost nothing. That's how competent central banks work; that's why inflation is lower in advanced counteies. It's called "the Great Moderation" and it's been going almost 40 years strong; only Covid supply shocks have interrupted that long record, and in the grand scheme of things 7% is not that big and much better than the insane swings of crypto valuations.