Project Neon finally has an official name! Microsoft today introduced the "Fluent Design System" for Windows 10, coming in the Fall Creators Update later this year.

Microsoft today unveiled its new design language for Windows 10, called the Microsoft Fluent Design System and formally known as Project Neon. This new design language is an "evolution" of Metro, first introduced in Windows 8 back in 2012, and it includes several new design elements and functionalities that developers can take advantage of.

The goal of Fluent Design is to deliver harmonious, intuitive, inclusive and responsive cross-device experiences and interactions. Developers will be able to build beautiful, expressive apps with the Fluent Design language, with animations, blur and fluidity, according to Microsoft.

Windows Insiders will have already seen this new Fluent Design System in action via first-party Windows 10 apps. For example, Microsoft recently pushed updates to Groove, Calculator, Films & TV, and more, that introduced improved user-interfaces within the apps, including blur and hover animations. Developers will now also be able to develop apps officially using the Fluent Design System, with the design language also coming to the OS over time too.

Microsoft also admits that the experiences Windows users see on certain devices can differ dramatically, and the Fluent Design System is designed to cater to those different device types, providing the best user-interface designs depending on your device type.

From Microsoft:

These devices all behave differently and fulfill different needs. From large screens to no screens they rely on touch, ink, voice, gaze, and gesture. Every day, developers also face the challenge of a multi-device, multi-interaction world, and we are committed to simplifying this world with a modern Microsoft design system.

Windows Insiders will start seeing more apps and system elements make the switch to the new Fluent Design Language throughout the development of the Fall Creators Update, with the first official parts of the Fluent Design Language going live in the Fall for the public.