HoloLens 2 with phoneSource: Windows Central

What you need to know

  • Alex Kipman shared his vision for the future of the HoloLens in a recent interview.
  • Kipman believes that the HoloLens could replace screens such as monitors and phones.
  • Kipman speculated about a potential future in which you could speak with an AI version of a person who died years ago.

Alex Kipman shared his vision and goals for HoloLens in a recent interview with Smithsonian. In the interview, Kipman discussed the development of the HoloLens 2, its roll in the future, and his goals for the device.

Kipman is the man behind the machine, leading the engineering efforts of the HoloLens and HoloLens 2. Kipman discussed in the interview a potential future in which the HoloLens replaces multiple popular devices for everyday people, asking, "Why would I have my computer if I have infinite monitors in front of me? Why would I have a phone?" Kipman admits that this future is far away, stating, "We've got a ways to go before we've got something that you can wear all day." According to the Smithsonian, Kipman believes that a HoloLens device will eventually be as small as a pair of glasses.

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Hands-on with HoloLens 2 and its Windows Core OS

The interview breaks down several discussions with Kipman, including the potential for HoloLens to facilitate communication. Kipman discussed how HoloLens could be used to speak with someone far away as if they were in the same room. He even took it further, playfully discussing the possibility to talk with an AI version of a person who has passed, "Wouldn't it be nice if you were in your home, and I had been dead a hundred years, and we were having this conversation?"

Holographic computing

Microsoft HoloLens 2

HoloLens, but better

HoloLens 2 takes everything that made the original great and turns it up to 11. With a new carbon-fiber body, extra padding, eye tracking, and a wider field of view, the headset should have no problem finding success among developers and firstline workers.

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