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Geekbench scores fuel the flames of rumors surrounding the NVIDIA Ampere GPU

NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti
NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti (Image credit: Windows Central)

What you need to know

  • Three Geekbench listings show off scores for what could be the NVIDIA Ampere GPU.
  • The scores show GPUs with up to 7,936 CUDA cores clocked at 1,100 MHz.
  • These graphics cards could be for large-scale complex applications rather than gaming.

Three Geekbench listings stoked the flames of rumors around the NVIDIA Ampere GPU. The listings show a device with up to 7,396 CUDA cores and other devices with up to 7,552 CUDA cores and 6,912 CUDA cores. Many outlets have speculated about NVIDIA's Ampere GPU, and the numbers of these GPUs line up enough to make people suspect they are for NVIDIA's new lineup.

As with all stories that revolve around released Geekbench scores of unreleased devices, you have to take these figures with a grain of salt. Firstly, the test occurred in October 2019, meaning that any hardware that hit those figures could have experienced several changes since then. Additionally, people can tweak or fake Geekbench scores, so we have to be cautious when looking at results like these.

Twitter user @W_At_AR_U first spotted the unknown NVIDIA GPUs. The first listing shows a device with 124 CUs for 7,936 CUDA cores (assuming that each streaming multiprocessor has 64 CUDA cores). It's clocked at 1.1GHz and has 32GB of memory clocked at 1.2GHz.

A second listing shows a device with 118 CUs, which would likely mean it has 7,552 CUDA cores. It's clocked at 1.1GHz with 24GB of memory at 1.2GHz. The third listing shows a device with 108 CUs, which would likely mean 6,912 CUDA cores, clocked at 1.01GHz. It also lists 47GB of memory, though Hot Hardware points out that that figure is likely a mistake.

Even if these figures are accurate and these cards come out, PCGamer points out that these would be HPC GPUs. That means they'd be for large-scale complex applications, not gaming. If are looking for gaming GPUs, check out our roundup of the best graphics cards for a ton of information.

Sean Endicott
Sean Endicott

Sean Endicott is the news writer for Windows Central. If it runs Windows, is made by Microsoft, or has anything to do with either, he's on it. Sean's been with Windows Central since 2017 and is also our resident app expert. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com.