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Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse review: A budget Surface Precision Mouse

Are you looking for a Surface Precision Mouse on a budget? Perhaps the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse is your answer.

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse
(Image: © Windows Central)

Microsoft has released a brand new ergonomic mouse that takes design cues from its premium Surface Precision Mouse and folds it into a package that costs half the price. If you've always been a fan of the Surface Precision Mouse's ergonomic design and rich feature-set, but couldn't justify its $99 price tag, the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse is the next best thing.

Announced alongside many other Microsoft accessories on October 2, the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse has key features from the Surface Precision Mouse without the price tag to match. I've been using one for the last two weeks, and have been comparing directly to the Surface Precision Mouse. Here's our review.

CategoryMicrosoft Ergonomic Mouse
ConnectionWired USB 2.0 Type A
Dimensions4.63 x 3.03 x 1.06 inches (117.5 x 76.3 x 43.3 mm)
Weight3.67 oz (104 g)
ColorsBlack
LaserMicrosoft BlueTrack™ Technology

What you'll love about the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

The Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse features the same design as found on the Surface Precision Mouse. That means it's incredibly comfortable to use and has been built from the ground up with an ergonomic design that has proven to be popular among many mice makers. It has a thumb rest on the left-hand side, and easy to press left-click and right-click buttons.

Unlike the Surface Precision Mouse, the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse is incredibly lightweight. I'd describe it as airy, as it doesn't have any wireless receiver components on the inside. I like how lightweight this mouse is. However, I understand this won't be for everyone. Some might describe its weight as making it feel a little cheap, and I can understand that.

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

On the left-hand side, there are two programmable buttons for the user to configure. By default, these are set to back and forward inside a web browser, but you can change these with the Microsoft Keyboard and Mouse Center to do whatever you like. For me, I set the left button to open Task View, and the right button to minimize the current window.

The scroll-wheel is plastic, but it's coated in a metal-paint that makes it feel premium and cold to the touch. It's a soft scroll that has a very slight tick to it when rolling. I have no complaints with the scroll wheel on this mouse.

What you'll dislike about the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

For the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse to come in at the price that it does, it does have to cut some corners over the Surface Precision Mouse. For starters, it's not Bluetooth. I'm personally not bothered by this, but it's something to keep in mind when purchasing this accessory. It is a 100 percent fully wired mouse with a long USB-A cable to plug into a PC or laptop.

It also features one less programmable button on the left side. The Surface Precision Mouse has three to configure, whereas the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse has just two. Again, I'm not bothered by this personally, as two is more than enough for me, but if you're someone who is super into macros and button shortcuts, this may be important to you.

There's also no dedicated profile switch feature. The Surface Precision Mouse, since it's wireless, allows you to switch between three dedicated profiles, which can be linked up to three separate machines. The Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse doesn't have this feature for obvious reasons.

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

The scroll wheel on the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse is fine, but it doesn't have the option to switch to a smooth-scrolling mode like the Surface Precision Mouse does. I prefer the default scrolling mode on the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse anyway.

Should you buy the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse?

Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

The Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse retails for just $40 in the United States and has 70 percent of the feature-set that the Surface Precision Mouse has for $100. I think if you're on a tight budget but want a mouse that isn't wireless, is comfortable, and configurable, the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse is the one to get.

The only reason you should splash out for the Surface Precision Mouse is if you need the extra configurable button, the dedicated profile switch feature, or the ability to switch the scroll wheel to smooth scrolling. The Surface Precision Mouse also feels a little more premium as it's heavier, but that ultimately comes down to personal taste.

I like the Microsoft Ergonomic Mouse, and it's more than enough for my workflow. I do wish there was an option for a Bluetooth mode, maybe for $10 more, but it makes sense as to why that isn't included here. This is designed to be a cheap yet versatile mouse, and I think it does that job perfectly.

Zac Bowden
Zac Bowden

Zac Bowden is a Senior Editor at Windows Central. Bringing you exclusive coverage into the world of Windows 10 on PCs, tablets, phones, and more. Also an avid collector of rare Microsoft prototype devices! Keep in touch on Twitter: @zacbowden.

2 Comments
  • Good review for a nice looking mouse but the no wireless is killing me.
  • This is useful but what about this compared to the Classic Intellimouse? Sounds like the same basic package at the same price but with somewhat different ergonomics. Is the sensor the same?