Water can be public enemy number one for Windows Phones, Bluetooth headsets and just about any electronic device. You can find plenty of waterproof bags for your Windows Phones but Bluetooth headsets aren't too effective when stowed away in a waterproof bag. Enter the Wavetooth IPX8 waterproof Bluetooth headset which is reportedly the first waterproof Bluetooth headset.  We've seen water resistant headsets, like the Samsung WEP-430, but I can't remember a water proof headset.

The creation of Hong Kong inventor John Mak, the Wavetooth allows you to enjoy being around the water and stay connected to your Windows Phone.  We've had a review unit for about a week now so ease on past the break to see how well this waterproof headset performed.

 

Water can be public enemy number one for Windows Phones, Bluetooth headsets and just about any electronic device. You can find plenty of waterproof bags for your Windows Phones but Bluetooth headsets aren't too effective when stowed away in a waterproof bag. Enter the Wavetooth IPX8 waterproof Bluetooth headset which is reportedly the first waterproof Bluetooth headset.  We've seen water resistant headsets, like the Samsung WEP-430, but I can't remember a water proof headset.

The creation of Hong Kong inventor John Mak, the Wavetooth allows you to enjoy being around the water and stay connected to your Windows Phone.  We've had a review unit for about a week now so ease on past the break to see how well this waterproof headset performed.

 

Design

The Wavetooth is technically a headset by virtue of using a wired headphone. The body of the device is about the size of a match box and can be worn on your waist band via a belt hook or around your neck with the included lanyard.

You have the option of using stereo or mono earbuds with the Wavetooth. A rubber band helps seal the 3.5mm jack to maintain the Wavetooth's waterproofing.

Along with the Wavetooth units and two wired headphones the Wavetooth is packaged with a waterproof bag for your phone, and a USB charging cable. The waterproof bag is large enough to fit most Windows Phones (the Tilt2 had plenty of elbow room) and can be worn on your arm. Construction seemed solid and in bathtub tests, kept things nice and dry.

On the face of the Wavetooth are soft buttons to control volume, song advance/repeat, and a multi-function button for call control. The multi-function button is aptly named the "Z" button. There are two small LED lights (red and blue) on the face of the Wavetooth that acts as an indicator for various functions of the headset.

The Wavetooth is charged via USB ports and the battery life is reported to be 13 hours of talk time and 200 hours of stand by time. More than enough time for a run around the lake on a personal watercraft or lounging on the beach.

The effective range of the Wavetooth is listed as ten meters (about 33 feet). This should be long enough for you to keep your Windows Phone high and dry on your lounge chair, cool off in the pool and stay connected.

The Wavetooth is also A2DP compatible which allows you to listen to audio files through the headset.

Waterproofing

The Wavetooth is billed as being waterproof for up to three meters. The core is waterproof with the microphone and 3.5mm headphone ports sealed to prevent water from reaching what's under the hood.

It is recommended to wash out the microphone and headset ports with tap water after use to avoid rust or salt build ups. It is also recommended that you make sure the 3.5mm port is dry before charging the Wavetooth.

The manufacturer does not recommend wearing the Wavetooth while water skiing for concern that it may bounce around too much. Possibly striking you in the head or body, causing injury.

Fit and Feel

The Wavetooth is light enough not to weigh down your neck and if you wear it on your waistband, you'll likely forget you have it on. The clip feels a little fragile and I felt more comfortable using the Wavetooth with the lanyard.

It did seem a little cumbersome at times with the wired headset. If the wire is to the front, it can dangle enough to get in your way. I found it best to run the wire behind my back. Still it felt a little odd.

The one carry option that seemed to work the best is using the Wavetooth with an arm band (not included).  An armband puts the microphone closer to my mouth and while I still had to contend with the earbud wire, I didn't have the bounce associated with using the lanyard.  The trade off is that accessing the controls may become a little bit of a stretch.

Operation

Pairing the Wavetooth is initiated by pressing the "Z" key for 10-20 seconds until both LED lights alternately flash. From their you have your Windows Phone find the Wavetooth and if necessary, you enter that top secret pairing code of "0000".

The Wavetooth doesn't have a dedicated power button and instead, this is controlled with the "Z" button. The Wavetooth features are also controlled with various presses, taps, and holds of the "Z" button. Obviously, the Wavetooth will answer calls as well as redialing the last number and rejecting calls.

Performance

Audio quality was good through either of the earbud speakers. Audio files streamed nicely through the Wavetooth as well. There was a small amount of static present when the volume is maxed out but dialing things down eliminated the noise.

I was concerned at having the microphone positioned so far from my mouth.  It performed surprisingly well when worn on the lanyard using a normal tone and volume.  While you do have to raise your voice when wearing the Wavetooth on the waist, it picks up your voice nicely.  It does pick up a little more background noise than your average Bluetooth headset but nothing to complain about.

Overall Impression

When I was first contacted to review the Wavetooth, I had my reservations. After handling and using the Wavetooth, I see it having potential.  It's not an "everyday" type of headset but instead for more specialized use.

The Wavetooth isn't so much a hands free solution while swimming, operating a personal watercraft, or windsurfing.    But instead, it's a convenient way to access your phone while around, on or in the water. I can see it saving time from having to retrieve your Windows Phone from the boot of your WaveRunner or from your beach bag to find your phone.

The waterproof pouch that the Wavetooth is shipped with will do the job and should hold Windows Phones as large as the HTC HD2. It passed the shower and sink tests but if you're going to be out in rougher waters, you may want to look for a more sturdier waterproof solution for your Windows Phone (such as the Aquapac Case).

Overall, the Wavetooth is a nice Bluetooth headset. The waterproofing makes it unique and overall performance is on par with most non-waterproof headsets. I would have liked to have seen a dedicated power button to help take the load off the "Z" button. The LED's can also be hard to pick up and wouldn't hurt to be larger.

The clip may be the weak link with regards to build quality. I would have preferred a thicker clip or maybe a stainless steel clip. I also wouldn't mind seeing a rubber skin to protect the Wavetooth from bumps, dings or drops. But for it's intended use, the design and functionality of the Wavetooth will do.

Currently, the Wavetooth is running $55 and has limited availability. You can pick one up directly from the manufacturer or through their Ebay Store. The Wavetooth isn't for everyone but if you need a waterproof solution to stay connected to your Windows Phone while in, on or around water the Wavetooth should get strong consideration.