Skype now allows for sharing of files, photos and videos of up to 300MB

Microsoft is allowing all users of its Skype VoIP service to share files, photos and videos of up to 300MB each with friends and groups.

In a blog post (opens in new tab), Microsoft stated files that are shared on Skype can be accessed later if the person that is receiving the file is offline. They can also download the same file multiple times on different devices. Microsoft added:

Over the last few weeks we've tested a number of different file size limits for file sharing. Based on the results of these tests, we are setting a limit of 300MB per file as this accommodates almost all the file sizes shared over Skype, and has been working well for our millions of users since it started rolling out several weeks ago.

Microsoft recommends using its OneDrive cloud file storage service for users who want to share files that are larger than 300MB.

41 Comments
  • Useful!
  • If you are on iOS or Android! Does it work on WP?  I don't think so!!!
  • It will with the upcoming universal app.
  • I hope that uwp version for the anniversary update..... I said I hope...
  • So doesn't work. As usual.
  • Using Skype for desktop while in a call or chat click on Conversation>Send>file
    The directions in the Skype Help are very old.
  • So your world end?
  • No download link here so no
  • Yeah.  As usual, WP is overlooked by all, even MS. "First and best!" /s
  • It will be available on the upcoming Skype UWP app
  • i've shared tens of gigabytes thanks to skype file transfers being p2p they are practically guaranteed to finish, and now they will call this a feature? what saddens me is how they refer to p2p as "an old unsupported transfer protocol" in new dumb apps
  • Skype File Transfers changed a long time ago.  Where hae you been?  The new transfer protocols for Photos was put in well over a year ago, and caused lots of issues as different versiosn of the Skype client got updated to support it at different times.  iOS users could share with each other, but trying to share with Windows users you'd get an error about unsupported clients and such. You're a bit late with this complain. And P2P is an old protocol, and incredibly insecure to boot.
  • Sharing files on OneDrive??uploading speed is something like 80kbps
  • In Belgium, it's between 2 and 6MBps (pretty normal in the country). But Skype file transfer is very bad (a nice picture of 2 or 3MB needs more than 1 minute to be transferred)
  • Same here. I can upload to OneDrive as fast as my XFinity allows. Definitely fast enough to send my files or videos overseas.
  • 0.3 in Italy....But it s our average adsl Internet upload speed :(
  • Does this app display ads?
  • hurry up and implement that SMS into the Skype UWP app already! its what we've all been waiting for!
  • It will be coming - be patient
  • Oh yes, it is coming Soon™, if at all. I'd say it probably either won't come, or it will take 1+ years.
  • either way, it is coming. what i do know that is coming soon or maybe not is patience.
  • Can you share multiple stuff with the select feature and share to WhatsApp in the new skype UWP app?
  • I miss Skype p2p sharing. It was quick and bandwidth saving. File transfer in Skype now is sad situation
  • Sigh.
  • Yes, it was faster, but you also need to mention in the same context the reasons why they moved to a server-based model from P2P. One of them was security. P2P model had so many security holes it was like a collander. If one of the private supernodes ended up being hacked, or heavens forbid was run by a hacker....you get the idea. Now, it's slower, but safer with someone at least watching over the whole network.  Not saying it's safe, but it is heck of a lot safer than before the switch. Second, remember the massive crash when none of us were able to use Skype for days. It literally got congested with traffic and ran out of steam right after MSFT bought it. So they made teh wise choice and replaced with something more scalable. I'm in no way happy with the file transfer speed, don't get me wrong. It is slow. But I woudl take that for increased security any day.
  • Actually, I rather think it was the opposite.  The P2P model was incredibly secure--so secure that MS themselves, and the law enforcement agencies they are in cahoots with--could not gain access to the contents of the calls.
  • Isn't that picture from the upcoming new Skype universal windows app??
  • Yeah, you can sideload a fairly old version of it, but it still works well for what it does so far. They didn't officially get the preview release out in June as they intended so I guess they are just running behind a little on where they expected to be.
  • one same blog post ,they have pic of iphone showing Skype and not Windows device
  • Well the Skype app on Windows Phone is pretty dated, the UWP preview isn't officially out on Mobile even
  • Forget dated.  As far as I can tell, it doesn't actually work for file sharing.
  • When is the new app going public, cause the present windows 8.1 version is just awful
  • My friend is an animator and we shared gigabytes of media data for his projects. Thanks for making Skype wothless garbage for us. 
  • Most decent routers these days offer VPN feature, so I wouldn't bother with Skype in your case. OneDrive is an option too, it actually is not that bad. I just uploaded nearly 40GB of videos to it. Uploading at 0.5 MB per second, which is my ISP's uplink speed, so I was the bottleneck, not OneDrive.   
  • they just should enable normal file transfer idc for offline , man if I want file il download it to my phone lol....
    Just hope UWP for redstone will be good, it does look promising too :)
  • Didn't Skype originally have similar functions many years ago?
  • Not in mobile tho was always
  • Oh man we need a good uplink speed to send 300MB files .. Anyway good
  • Doesn't work on Lumia 730
  • lovely App
  • Another setback of Skype is that its a battery hog, MS is very slow on implementation, look at where Whatsapp is now yet Skype was the first, they always trail behind in certain areas yet they are the first that would have come up with the idea.