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Windows 10 for phone to support NFC payments similar to Apple Pay

Microsoft wants owners of Windows 10 for phones to pay for goods and services similar to how Apple Pay works for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. It detailed those plans last week at a presentation at its WinHEC 2015 hardware conference in China.

You may remember that Softcard released NFC-based "Tap to Pay" apps for Windows Phone in November for Verizon and T-Mobile, and then a few months later announced those apps would be shut down on March 31, due to Google acquiring their technology for use in Google Wallet.

Windows 10 tap to pay

During WinHEC 2015 Microsoft revealed that Windows 10 for phones will support Host Card Emulation (HCE). HCE will allow any smartphone with Windows 10 and NFC hardware to transmit payments from the device to an NFC terminal designed to receive that money but without needing a special secure app like Softcard. It also won't require any secure SIMs from wireless carriers. The slide shows that VISA, MasterCard and American Express are supporting this feature.

HCI is already supported in Google's Android since Android 4.4.

Windows 10 tap to pair

Another slide shows that Windows 10 will also support "Tap to pair" for NFC hardware so it can pair with a Wi-Fi Direct device via Wi-Fi Protected Setup. It will also support tapping to a Miracast dongle, presumably so that the screen for a Windows 10 smartphone can be mirrored to a larger screen that has such a dongle installed.

It's possible that not every Windows 10 smartphone will have NFC support but those devices that do contain the hardware should be able to pay for things at the grocery store, restaurants or other locations that have an NFC payment solution. We should learn a lot more about Microsoft's plans for this part of Windows 10 in late April as part of its Build 2015 developer conference.

Source: Channel 9

227 Comments
  • They had the chance to jump the gun with the 920 but as always MS is slow to progress and last to implement. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Exactly,sometimes you wonder how these guys think!
  • Want some cheese with that whine?
  • I drink tequila. Whine is to slow. Just like MS with Windows Phone Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Yea tequila will crash you on the floor and you have to reboot yourself again. Just like Android phone. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Windows Phone
  • Lame. I don't crash with cheap tequila. But I do get drunk faster and better. Lol nice try. This has nothing to do with Android but thanks for playing. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • I loved my 920, but my LG G2 has never once crashed and needed rebooted in the 2 months
  • Lol!
  • Pull over for the siren Android User. To is a versatile preposition. A few of its many definitions are (1) toward, (2) reaching as far as, and (3) until.1 Too is an adverb meaning (1) additionally, (2) excessively, (3) very, or (4) extremely.2 Whenever you’re in doubt about whether to useto or too, see if any of those synonyms of too (i.e., additionallyextremely, etc.) would work in its place. If none fits, then to is probably the word you’re looking for.
  • >I drink tequila. Whine is to slow. Just like MS with Windows Phone   You won the internet today, Seriously LOL
  • Lolol Hilarious!!
  • You're speculating that Microsoft didn't do anything at that time, but the truth is we don't really know the whole story behind this.  Maybe they did try to implement something with it and the banks simply weren't ready for it.  All we know is that there was no NFC payment feature back then, but we may be able to get something equivalent to Apple Pay when Windows 10 comes out.  At the very least, Microsoft didn't wait a few years to make this happen so give them credit for not omitting this feature in Windows 10. 
  • I actually find that most likely the case. They didn't have the security protection there even though the idea was sound and available. 
  • Two points:  First, when the 920 was released dispite having NFC technology is wasn't widely utilized like it is now. Sure it existed but its only really gotten popular within the past two years. Second, the 920 was pretty much all Nokia, so MSFT was pretty much testing the waters. Now that they are intrusively engaged in hardware manufacturing, things will speed up.  The bottom line is they are building Windows 10 to be the epic release they've been claiming it to be, and I for one can't wait.
  • I'm honestly tired of hearing the words epic with Windows Phone. That wor has been floating for 3 years now. Bottom line is MS continues to find ways to stay behind the competition and produces features that will not win anyone over because they are never doing enough to stand out from the competition. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • I can see you're bucking for a career within Microsoft and hope that they can espy a scintilla of problem-solving & creativity within you during the Recruitment Interview.
  • It would take 2 years for that interview Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Microsoft just became and official manufacture of mobile phone in 2014. 2015 is the official release of Microsoft branded mobile phones. Remember before they were dependent on OEM's to create products now Microsoft creates there own products running there own OS built the way they want. We wont be saying they are slow by 2016. Give them credit they have been doing quite a bit since the creation of Surface and Windows Phone 7 & 8.
  • I remember when the Icon first came out, and my technical relatives (Apple-using of course) said that NFC was an unnecessary technology that had already been replaced by other wireless technologies. Fast forward a year, and now Apple fans will tell you that they are "glad Apple invented NFC so they could make Apple pay work".
  • Guys is not that easy, remember Microsoft is a patent troll. That's why I guess. Looking for ways to avoid patents fees.
  • Microsoft is not a Saint, but I think it is not a Paten Troll either: "a person or company who enforces patent rights against accused infringers in an attempt to collect licensing fees, but does not manufacture products or supply services based upon the patents in question.
  • The subject of patent trolls and other related topics are covered quite well in the 4-part video series: "Everything is a Remix". A great watch if you ever get the chance.  Just search on the interwebs.
  • Microsoft at least patents their technologies. Apple will just sue you. They have a cross licensing agreement with Micrsosoft. So, those two stay out of each others way, but everyone else is fair game.
  • I totally agree. I still use and love my 920 everyday. Been using it for more than two years now. I only wonder if they have released 930 and 940 in 2013 and 2014 in all carriers at around Sep each year, we would have been more than the just meare 3% market share. What a missed opportunity. 
  • As long as Apple keeps a lock on the non Droid market in the US nothing will change.
  • MS did try to implement NFC payments.  It was built into the native Wallet app starting in Windows Phone 8.  Unfortunately, the only standard for NFC payments at that time involved the "secure SIM" system which is controlled by the cellular carriers.  The carriers blocked native wallet apps for both MS and Google because they wanted to force their own payment channel which was their shared company "Softcard".  Anyway, MS (and Nokia) did try to implement NFC payments using the closest thing to a standard at the time.  Apple doesn't care about standards so they made their own closed proprietary process.  Apple has enough user base to force the industry to adopt their process.  Windows Phone does not have enough user base to create their own process and expect the industry to support it.  Fortunately, newer standards are coming along and it sounds like Windows 10 will support those.
  • Google had absolutely no problem building Google Wallet into the OS so that Carriers couldn't block it. That's excuses. As lock down as MS OS was that could had been changed in 8.1. I been using Google Wallet for two years no issues with carriers. Hmmm two years is the same age of the 920. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Aitt the carriers did block Wallet in the US. that's why Google has bought softcard.
  • I see you never used Google Wallet. Carriers blocked and then Google blocked them from blocking Wallet. I been using both Wallet and Softcard because Google made it to where you can select with Wallet to use. This has been like this for a while now. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Google can't "block them from blocking Wallet."  The carrier owns the secure SIM and they have to authorize apps to use it.  You clearly don't understand this technology very well at all.  You are still using Softcard (which was owned by the carriers until recently) as part of the payment chain.  The native wallet app didn't work without that part because the carriers blocked it to prevent competition with their Softcard business.  I was doing the same thing on Windows Phone until Google bought Softcard and ended support for Windows Phone so your original argument that MS 'didn't do anything with NFC payments' makes no sense.  The MS and Google native Wallet apps didn't need the Softcard app originally.  They had all the required technology built in and just needed to access the secure SIM as a way of proving the devices identity.  It worked fine until the carriers got gready and decided to block anything but their own wallet app named Softcard from accessing the secure SIM.  MS directed users to use the Softcard app, Google modified their Wallet app to sit on top of softcard (which is kind of redundant and is still limited to the Softcard app's restrictions and payment channels).  Google did this to fool people like you into thinking that their wallet app does something special even though it's really just another layer on top of the Softcard app.  Google has now bought Softcard as a way to solve the problem.  MS appears to be looking at just moving towards the more open standards that are finally coming along.  Both MS and Google were early adopters of NFC payment technology and both had similar levels of success until recently.
  • Lol this was funny read. You do know that Google switched to HCE in 4.4 right making the need for secure sims obsolete. That was two years ago. Carriers were no longer able to block wallet. That's why when you had both Wallet and Softcard you had to select one or the other. SMH but I guess I wouldn't know using wallet for two years without softcard. Can you explain then how I was able to use Google wallet on my non carrier Sony without softcard and having a ATT secure sim? I'll wait. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • @aitt, your "two years" timeline does not add up.  Here's why... 1) Android 4.4+ does support HCE, but it was released less than 1.5 years ago. 2) Visa, Mastercard, and Amex didn't begin supporting HCE until around this time last year. 3) The first North American bank to support HCE was in 12/2014 which was just a few months ago. Assuming you are in the US, I find it hard to believe that you have been making payments via HCE on your Android phone for two years considering that NONE of the infrastructure was in place 1.5 years ago and the last required part only became available about 4 months ago.  Quite frankly I think you are full of crap. 
  • Well yeah sorry I'm not precise to your standards and generalizing but thank you for acknowledgment of HCE and that it bypass secure sim. Something that WP just now getting to. 1.5 years now. And yes I have been using Wallet at Walgreens since 2013. I know that may be hard to believe. But regardless of what you want to argue. Wallet never needed Softcard, carriers block wallet, google changed that to "block" carriers from blocking Wallet by changing the structure. Google simply bought out softcard cause it was a waste for carriers. But whatever the case no wallet does not and never needed softcard. It may had needed secure sims but never softcard. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • You're still not making sense. SECURE SIM=SOFTCARD. There is no way around that. HCE looks to circumvent Secure SIMs entirely. If you need a Secure SIM, you are not using HCE, you are using Softcard. The SIM card is how the Carriers control access to NFC payments by making it only work with their approved app. Because HCE is software based right on your phone, you will not need a special SIM card or anything else to be able to use it. It will operate off of the native Microsoft or Google wallet app. What Cleavitt76 has been saying is right, Google simply laid their Google Wallet on a softcard backend to make it look like it was working natively. Although Android 4.4 did as you say support HCE, it wasn't being used because the infrastructure simply was not in place for it. Now that it is, Microsoft is taking advantage of it.
  • "And yes I have been using Wallet at Walgreens since 2013." Wow, Walgreens.  I thought we were having a discussion about universal mobile payments via native Wallet functionality, but apparently we are talking about how much more advanced Android is in "Walgreens" payments.  I sure hope that WP can catch up to Google's lead in the Walgreens payment industry.  That way I can leave my credit cards behind and just start buying all my groceries, clothes, gas, dining, movies, and everything else at Walgreens with my phone.  Google really has this Walgreens payment system figured out.  Your whole argument makes so much more sense now. /s Keep moving those goal posts, Champ.
  • Were you using it anywhere else besides Walgreen? Google wallet never really caught on because it had difficulty getting the banks and merchants to adapt it. I thought the whole point of the softcard purchase was to help with that.
  • you are totally right...I had the htc one m7 using google wallet with HCE and the samsung galaxy s4 also used it and a host of other Android handsets. Wallet DID NOT have to use the Softcard app and if that was the case then how was I able to use the Wallet app on my Att Htc one m7 variant using T-Mo with Google Wallet tap n pay at Mc Donalds, Walgreens etc.? 
  • They still had to switch to HCE.
  • +1 for Cleavitt76
  • google actually didn't need to buy softcard as they added HCE years back.... that got around the carrier block of google wallet. Buying softcard got them marketshare and a few patents/tech items.  
  • They don't get it cause they never used ot Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • aitt. you clearly dont understand how this tech works, or why MS are in the position they are in. Simply whining all over the thread like a baby. MS were actually out of the gate before Apple, but the carriers inhibted them. The NFC payments war has 3 sides. Software companies, Banks and Carriers. All desperately trying to line themselves up for a massive pay day. This is hurting consumers. Apple have created their own system, and even with their massive market and mindshare are struggling to crack this. I hope (like HTML standards) that this war ends soon, and we can all use this great tech, so no more need to carry a wallet separate to your phone (at least for money). Now stop the juenvile RodneyeJ style MS whining, its tedious to read.
  • You still need carrier buy in, not to mention retailer support. That's the uphill battle for MSFT when it comes to it's mobile platform. What does someone have to gain t support a mobile payment option from an OS that only has 3% of the world utilizing it, unlike Google who has 80%+ using some rendition of Andriod. It was a lot more complicated then you think, which is why other outlets are posting this news as interesting being as Windows 10 "tap to pay" wont require carrier buy in, but still needs retailer support.  Having Visa, Master Card, and AMEX onboard are huge and again it reinforces MSFT being able to do what Nokia couldn't.  The power of persuasion helps when you still own the majority of market share value that most of these financial institutions run on anyway.  Windows phone by themselves is merely a blip on the radar, but Windows phone combined with Windows, and Xbox that is epic and MSFT knows it, which is why they're waiting to release a flag ship phone. If it is on par with the Surface Pro 3, which by then the Pro 4 will be out then things will slowly start to change here in the US.  If T-Mobile and Sprint continue to make the profits they are it will force Verizon and ATT to consider the subsidies they offer their customers.  Customers will eventially be paying closer to the retail value of the phones, and that could prove costly for Apple.  We'll have to see, but what advantage would getting an iPhone 6 Plus get you that you wouldn't get with a Lumia 640 XL running windows 10?
  • There was no buy in http://developer.android.com/about/versions/kitkat.html#44-hce This is essentially what MS is doing. Two years later. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Cleavitt Apple did not make the system they are using. The token they use was created by Visa . Apple created a front end for their devices to work with that system. It's basically a "white label" of the visa system http://usa.visa.com/clients-partners/technology-and-innovation/visa-digi...
  • I read that MS owns these patents: Specifically, PROVISIONING OF WIRELESS CONNECTIVITY FOR DEVICES USING NFC Provisioning (PROVISIONING) of the wireless connection regarding the apparatus which uses NFC Win 8 - NFC - Touchmark Icon Unless you are suggesting there are parameters outside of these patents for which Microsoft has no say with NFC, I would think MS can do NFC as it sees fit.
  • "MS is slow to progress" So are Apple and Google. Japanese cell phones have been doing this for about 15 years now. That said, I don't understand why anyone would ever use their phone to pay. Use a credit card: build up credit, earn cashback, have buyer protection and fraud protection, and, assuming you're responsible enough to pay off your balance in full each month, enjoy a one-month free loan to yourself.
  • You still need a credit card to pay with your phone...
  • If that's the case then my original point is even stronger: there is no reason to use a phone as a conduit for a credit card payment instead of just using the card itself.
  • Convenience  
  • My wife keeps losing her card.  I cant wait for this.
  • In many cases of NFC payment you are still using a credit card account to pay and all the rewards would still apply.  You are just emulating the physical credit card with a digital phone based transaction.  I was using my Amex card for Windows Phone NFC payments until Softcard support ended and earning reward points.
  • Lol you should check out phone pay on how it works Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • No thanks. I have no desire to use it so I have no desire to look up how it works.
  • Well than maybe you shouldn't speak on something you know nothing about. No? Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • I know enough: there's no reason to use a phone to pay for something instead of just using the credit card itself.
  • It's actually supposed to be more secure. I forget exactly how, but there is supposed to be an added benefit to paying with NFC
  • It's much harder to fake compared to just a magnetic strip credit card.  Technically, NFC is actually quite easy to intercept and fake, but the encrypted data and tokens that are being transmitted via NFC are not easy to reproduce and they can change periodiodically so even if the details are somehow intercepted they become useless before they can really be used.  It depends on the payment system and how it's implemented, but pretty much anything is better than mag strips which can be read and recreated with a couple hundred dollars work of hardware. Another advantage to Wallet apps is that you don't have to carry a whole bunch of cards around.  Credit cards, reward cards, etc are with you all the time if you have your phone.  Not exactly a life changing thing for most people, but I would find it useful at times.
  • Credit cards over here use NFC anyway. The only advantage to the phone is convenience it's quicker to get out than your cards. That being said, it is also much easier for someone who finds your phone to go on a buying frenzy (although I imagine it'll work like paypass and will still require a PIN for over 100 dollar purchases).
  • Firstly how about convenience? A phone can carry a lot more cards in it that your typical wallet can, in addition to this most people always carry thier phone with them and are less likely to leave thier phone somewhere compared to a credit card or wallett. In addition to this the wallet can be used for other NFC enables devices and tokens such as public transport and so on. Or how about secuirty? Magnetic strips are probably the least secure payment method going around. In Australia we already have NFC built into the actual credit card itself with around 80+% of retailers already supporting NFC payment terminals. If I was to loose my phsyical credit card anyone could pick it up and start using it to make purchases of up to $100 in a single transaction and they do not require a PIN or any security checks. On the other hand if I loose my phone whoever picks it up will need to unlock the phone first which is protected with a 4 digit PIN code and then would need to launch the wallet app which is again protected by a different 4 digit PIN code.
  • They didn't have support of the carriers so that ability was not allowed. WP has had a wallet feature since WP 8. Some select European critters allowed the wallet feature but it wasn't many. What did you want them to do? This comment is another wine-tasting event.
  • Thanks for playing though Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • "Jump the gun" means do something too soon.   So...you're complimenting them for not doing it?
  • Yeah? They did have the chance to do something too soon. Lol geez yall funny. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • Week they did it in Europe, where there was Carrier support and bank support, neither of which was present in the US due to WinPhone's low market penetration. Is no accident that there king of the US market got its Google Wallet going first.
  • In fairness: The carriers were holding this one back. Microsoft was trying to play nice, they failed. Now Microsoft is using this as an opportunity to take matters into their own hands and bypass the carriers.
  • Dann Android user...WC should stop support of that app.
  • You seem to forget that they tried, along with Google, to implement it. You had carriers, banks, and merchant associations each trying to create their own payment schemes and they would implement anything Microsoft or Google were proposing. It seems that now that Apple started doing this, the others are getting out of the way. I don't get why all these companies seem to be afraid of Apple. Google has much larger market share, and they couldn't get these companies to play along. Apple just has to announce something and everyone jumps.
  • This comment is perfect to make all the WP owners who bashed Apple Pay when it came out saying that WP "had it first". Yes, my 920 DID have it first, but I couldn't use it anywhere in the US. No carrier blocking bs guys, because Apple released the iPhone 6 in September and Apple Pay became useful one month later. Meanwhile, WP8 owners have been waiting since 2012 for this simple feature!   Thanks aitt. :)
  • Awesome!!!
  • I thought it was already in Wallet since WP8?
  • Me too, but it's just for payment SIM cards
  • I used mine with paypal at Dollar General on a Lumia 920.
  • Oh, awesome, didn't know u could do that
  • Yeah open it up and it will show you options.
  • Technically yes. But it required a secure app and secure SIM, both of which need to be provided via the carrier. Many carriers did indeed offer this, and it worked well. But alas, the US was held back because the carriers were extremely sluggish to roll out the necessary infrastructure, app, and secure element SIM cards. And now that Google has taken Softcard over, Windows Phone has been left in the dust. Hence why Microsoft is now taking matters into their own hands. They tried playing nice, it failed. But since they aren't competing against the carriers in the US anymore, I guess there isn't risk of Microsoft angering them.
  • Any SIM can do it, I bought my SIM from Straight talk on a ATT unlocked Lumia 920. You making it seem complicated, and it's not...it also works at Walgreens too.
  • Not any SIM, it has to have the secure element. So apparently your Straight Talk SIM came with a secure element, whether you knew it or not. And unlike the Big Four, Straight Talk didn't require their own proprietary app to do the job, they let the OS handle it. It's not complicated, you're right about that. That is, until the carriers get involved, which Microsoft is finally pulling and Apple and circumventing them entirely.
  • Same here, I never saw the big deal with Apple pay since WP8 had "wallet" and NFC. Didn't know there was a big difference.
  • HCE - "E"mulation
  • Yes, HOST CARD EMULATION (HCE) not HCI :D
  • Lol, way to miss an opportunity MS. They had this feature day one and abandoned it.
  • Did they? Or did banks and carriers refuse to cooperate? The latter seems more likely given history.
  • Anyways, he was right. Microsoft had this DAY ONE on WP and it hasn't been implemented as well as Apple Pay, which came out in OCTOBER! Blame other companies and carriers for all the problems Microsoft is having, but at the end of the day, WP is not doing well. It's sad :(
  • Well now MS is using HCE directly with the big three credit card companies. So it will work with all NFC terminals. We won't need them to support Apple Pay or require secure SIMs like Soft Card. This is a big plus in my book, especially if it works with MS Band. No need to pull my wallet or credit cards out at all anymore.
  • Wants some cheese?
  • They didn't miss an opportunity - they were, if anything, quite ahead of the game...but thanks to the a-hole carriers, they decided to quash the built in NFC opting for thier own Softcard - which we all see is not helping WP. If anything the carriers should be unlocking that feature now that they aren't owning thier own NFC app. My guess is Google made it very clear in the Softcard terms of sale that WP will not be allowed to use the built in NFC.
  • This is lame excuses. Google made Wallet work despite Carriers attempts to block it. As lock down as WP was they could had made their wallet work to. They just put it on the back burner and then came back after no one cares that this could had been something g of an advantage before Apple Pay came to light. I been using Google Wallet for two years now Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • I don't know how well Google Wallet has worked out, being that they ending up buying SoftCard.
  • You have no idea. Google had been widely more accepted than Softcard. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • It obviously hadn't done as well as expected or else they wouldn't have needed to purchase Softcard. Although, they probably just did it because Softcard supported Windows!
  • Lol nice try though. Carriers was dumping softcard cause it failed. Why not buy it and absorb their tech. Better google buy than Apple or Samsung. Wallet was fine without it. Lol if MS was smart they should had bought cause we all know their wallet died. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • And yet I have never seen any signs about google wallet being accepted. Apple pay signs are everywhere since it launched. THe banks show case it on their websites. I don't believe google wallet was that widely accepted. Softcard obvious wasn't widely accepted either since they decided to discontinue it and sell the technology to google.
  • Correction, you have been using Softcard for two years now through Google Wallet and thinking that it's the same thing as using the native Google Wallet functionality to make payments.  You have just been paying through Softcard with a different UI and you are still limited to whatever the Softcard payment channel supports.  That is no different than when the Softcard app was available on Windows Phone.
  • Dude just stop Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • ur talking a lot of shit on here man lol. I saw you comment on the recent article android central put up about softcard, and I KNOW you read all the comments about everyone complaining that google wallet was a fail. stop talking nonsense. it worked at walgreens, but try paying with it at Old Navy, or Sears? ha good luck. Same shit with the MS Wallet, it works at walgreens too. Or put your card on paypal and pay with that thru the MS Wallet. point is the carriers fucked everyone in the US over. Tmobile, Att, Verizon all used Softcard, why do you think Google Wallet was never on Spring phones? lol c'mon man do some research please -_-
  • Google Wallet used Host Card Emulation wiht AMEX only. That's part of the reason they bought out Soft Card to build their own payment processing like Apple Pay. Microsoft is using Host Card Emulation standards with Visa, Master Card, & Amex. So we'll have a wider choice. It will work directly between standard NFC terminals and the credit card company. No secure sim required or payment processors like Apple Pay or Softcard.
  • One wonders where the US's lame anti-trust laws are in this.
  • This looks to be a promising solution that isn't subject to the whims of carriers or app developers.
  • exactly my thought! I'm happy!
  • This is the best news! I was pretty worried both Android and iPhone would have pay with your phone and windows phone users would be left out to dry because of Google buying softcard. I think paying with your phone is going to become more and more common (at least here in the states) and to not have it could kill windows phone in a few years.
  • I thought it was already in Windows Phone 8?
  • Just for payment SIMs I think
  • Windows Phone had a wallet service that almost no one supported. The carriers messed everything up further by forcing their service Softcard formally ISIS and requireing secure SIMs to use that app. Now MS is not cutting out the middle men building Host Card Emulcation (HCE) into WP10. So HCE standards work directly with the credit card companies and banks. So the carriers can't screw it up. So all you will need to do is set up the service on your phone and you'll be able to use any NFC terminal that's active.
  • A lot of good news since last week ! :) Looking forward to Win 10 for phones
  • what to do so .. as i dont have now for my lumia 1520 simply wait for aroud 7 months to have it on my lumia1520
  • i thought i could do that with my 920s nfc which i got more than 2 yrs ago....can someone explain me whats new/different?
  • Typical for Microsoft, their solution required a special SIM, because that's what carriers wanted. None of said carriers then supported the feature and so it was still birth. If I were Microsoft, I'd have a doll for each carrier and be sticking pins in it every day. Doing away with them altogether would be so good.
  • There's a reason you're not microsoft
  • True. I don't think Microsoft should be in the doll business.
  • Want some cheese?
  • I want some cheese if you're giving it away. Good cheese is expensive these days.
  • To my knowledge, the hardware was there in the 920 but never actually utilized for tap to pay. Stores largely didn't have tap to pay terminals installed and MS never had the support of credit card companies to allow users to actual use NFC to pay. This is certainly welcome news. My question: Will retailers have to install special terminals to get this to work or will any terminal that accepts Apple pay and Google wallet also accept Windows Phone payments?
  • 100% standard. Works just like both of those.
  • NFC Terminals are standarized. So unlike Apple Pay which is a service HCI will work with any NFC terminal.
  • Good move, no carrier support needed at all. The way it should be.
  • Well - this is the way everything should be. The carries ripped us off for the last 30 years. Time for them to realised that they just offer a simple service of mobile data transfer - nothing else!
  • Yes... This NFC payments WERE supported by windows phone wallet. BUT the carriers blocked it. MS then dropped it, but the carriers then dropped their blocking of the service. You guys (commenters) relay need to keep up with the story before badmouthing companies.
  • The carriers then went one step further in their mess of trying to stick their fingers into this process when they sold their mess of softcard to Google. MS is is just a little slow with the reimplementation. Which is understandable as negotiations with credit card companies must be made.
  • Huuummmmmmm. Promises, promises you can't . Fingers crossed for positives.
    The App store lost another good-never-updated major app with ESPN Score Center. Another day in the life of Windows phone consumers!
  • There are alot of news from WinHEC, why haven't them all written at once as a single news by the time WinHEC ended? Or is it still going?
  • It was in China and no one was there. So we are hearing what is trickling out through MS blogs and other channels.
  • True true but it's never too late. Go MS ​
  • Slight correction: It was Verizon and AT&T with the Softcard app, not T-Mobile. But yes, this is awesome news!
  • Slight correction, it was Verizon, ATT, and T-Mobile, it was just that T-Mobile never actually released an app, even though they were part owners of the tech.
  • So much W10 mobile news and still no word on when the next release will come.I would love to try W10 on my Lumia 1520. 
  • I know right.
  • Yeah, me too! I suspect they don't want us trying it until flagship phones are ready. I guess it will ruin the buzz
  • I would like to try on my lumia 735
  • Marketing, Microsoft. Wrap this with a snazzy name like WinPay so people can evangelize the concept. Nobody cares about this techno-babble.
  • OnePay
  • So will this work straight from the OS, or will it be like when the Wallet was introduced in WP8, but it didnt actually work anywhere?
  • I second this question
  • This is EXACTLY how it was originally implemented to work through the wallet, but was blocked by carriers. Now that the carriers have naked down, MS is re-doing the service.
  • Right, but will the store payment system need to be specifically built to support Windows phone, or will it work without any extra code on that end? If not, this will be pointless
  • Fortunately, retailers and cellular carriers are not involved in this payment system which is how it should be.  This system involves the phone on the user end and the traditional payment processor (Visa, Mastercard, Amex, Discover, etc.) + bank on the other end.  The bank is only minimally involved as the technology changes only exist between the phone software and the payment processor.
  • The short answer is that this, in theory, will just work straight from the OS. HCE is a more open and less complicated standard for card-less payments.  Previous systems had a lot of extra links and middle men (cellular carriers and retailers for example) that were either not engaged at the time or actively working against competitors (which is why the Google and MS native Wallet apps didn't work in the US).  HCE basically only involves the payment processor (Visa, MC, Amex, etc.), the issueing bank, and the OS with no special hardware (other than NFC of course) required.  The payment processors are already supporting it, both MS and Google are moving to support the standard natively, and the banks just have to decide to allow that payment channel in general.  The banks aren't deciding on specific OS or anything like that.  They are just deciding to allow HCE payments via Visa, Mastercard, etc.  It takes very little effort on their part (less than Apply Pay) and since it is the closest thing to a standard and would cover both Android and Windows Phone I would expect it to gain traction just as quickly as Apply Pay.
  • Sweet!!
  • Thanks for the explanation.
  • So. Still good with my physical wallet.
  • So, since this has nothing to do with your regular wallet....
  • Sweet!
  • That's some pretty good news to start the day.
  • Hope this feature comes to existing phones with NFC
  • I tipped it!! Never got the credit!! :p
  • Cool.
  • When you saw this article you got credit as you know you tipped it!
  • Take that Chase and BOFA....
  • This will work great with the banking apps from Chase and Bank of America...Oh wait, nevermind.  Just like how banks refuse to support Windows Phone, no one will support NFC payments from Windows Phone either.
  • Bbbbbbbbullshit. I'll believe it when I see it
  • https://www.youtube.com/embed/lUwie6HFHjs Believe it now?
  • Nope. It existed in WP8, and was never implemented on AT&T. I'd like an explanation on how they're going to bypass the carrier.
  • They only needed the carrier for the secure sim card. Now that's bypassed with HCE host card emulation. But if that's not enough for you, you can always play the waiting game. But since this info is coming from MS it's pretty official. Don't know why you'd doubt it.
  • So did windows phone 8. Where did that take us?
  • Microsoft never integrated the secure element into the OS, it relied on a Secure SIM issued by the carrier, as well as a payment app. Now it's built in like Apple Pay, so out will circumvent the carriers.
  • This is great news, especially HCE!!!
  • I don't see how is this "similar" to ApplePay? This HCE system still requires involvement of both a card company and the bank software written for the OS, so we can expect that Android will start getting this soon while we continue to wait... The only real thing that changed here is that carriers are not involved any more. That's good.
  • Does it require Bank software written for the OS, or if the support is written into the OS by Microsoft (with the backing of Mastercard, Visa, American Express, etc.) would that not suffice?
  • Hopefully the Secure Element is already built into the exisiting hardware.
  • This is quite interesting, as I'm in Canada, and my bank, the Royal Bank of Canada, is a big proponent of this HCE payment method using NFC with cloud-based verification that supports debit and credit cards. It's already working on a limited trial basis (first in North America I believe) on their RBC Wallet app for Android and Blackberry (just need to be on the appropriate operating system level). This bank seems to support all platforms (I have the Windows Phone RBC app), and from what I've read the only requirement for HCE payments will be operating system support, and integration with existing debit and credit card systems. It looks like there's a good chance I'll be using this by the end of 2015 on my Windows Phone.
  • Me to my 1990 self: "In the future you'll walk around hitting things with a car phone so that you can do stuff like watch TV. I know this sounds confusing and dangerous now, but it will all work out."
  • *Tap
  • Lols
  • YESSS!!!!!
  • can we transfer files between phones using nfc and wifi direct??
  • Still needs support of banks. Given that Chase and Bank of America dropped WP, I wouldn't hold my breath.
  • Not banks. Payment processors. They are on board.
  • It still won't go anywhere, because this time, instead of counting on support from carriers, Microsoft is counting on support from another external party, credit card companies. Another question: is the secure element built in to the OS like Apple Pay? Like Apple, Microsoft should be going, one by one, to the major retailers and banks and getting them to sign on as official partners, but they seem to be kind of half assing this, a me-too feature basically.
  • I wish there was just 1 standard that everybody could implement....wouldn't that be nice for us consumers. Apple has the clout in the mobile world, and the numbers of users that means they can partner with stores etc. I guess in the same way they are able to get 99% of control over updates to iPhones. Would have been good if Visa or Mastercard had come up with something universal and really pushed for people to use it.
  • As far as I know this is a universal standard which was developed by Visa/Mastercard and only needs to be implemented at the OS level. In otherwords every single bank/card supplier that currently supports Apple Pay will also support Windows Phones provided they have HCE which will presumably be all Windows 10 devices. This is the same for the retailers, yes retailers can block HCE hardware at their terminals however this will also block all other HCE devices including Apple Pay.
  • One question. When?
  • Tomorrow @ 14.00
  • Why haven't you put the video that describes the feature ?
  • So many features coming to Windows 10 Mobile... So few months to RTM... Just one BUILD released so far... I don't think they will can complete all these until summer...
  • Microsoft have a Lot of new internal builds as well as Windows 10
  • Interesting. One less reason to move away from my two year old Lumia 920, which already has NFC built-in.
  • Cool. Cool. Cool. About time.
  • Been waiting for this to be available in the UK on Vodafone for ages now. My 1020 technically supports it I believe, but the carriers, stores, and maybe Microsoft themselves have all been slow to actually make any of this work.
  • RE: NFC in general, I've not really seen anything that useful so far. Nice being able to pair to my speakers at home with a tap, but once it's paired I never need to tap it again, for a one off pairing just doing it through settings isn't really a big burden. Payments is the only/one of the few places NFC would be very useful, we have it in Bank Cards already and they work great for small transactions
  • Too good to be true.......
  • "Microsoft always behind" should be their slogan.. man for once.. come up with a feature that no other phone has.. should be a game changer calibre .. something like siri.. touch ID.. Apple pay.. a high end smartwatch/phone Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • We already have something like that in Finland via Elisa Wallet app. (Elisa is a Finnish carrier) I can pay up to 25€ euros with my Lumia (NFC) without opening the phone.
  • Will Windows10 supports the background downloading in the Lumia mobiles??is any communication about that???
  • Here's a Video Demo. https://www.youtube.com/embed/lUwie6HFHjs From http://www.nokiapoweruser.com/windows-10-to-bring-hce-support-tap-to-pay-demo-video-details-more-nfc-changes/
  • Will this bypass carriers in the US from blocking it?
  • Yes
  • It does not require a secure sim. It's done directly in the OS with the credit card companies. No third party or carrier support required, the way it should be.
  • Since mobile payments are pretty rare here in Belgium I don't really care about this aspect specifically, but I hope this means they will also focus on bringing back the functionality they cut from the wallet, things like passbook support and the ability to manually add loyalty cards etc.
  • I thought we already had this.
  • We do its just getting better
  • Good now they just need a name for the service other than wallet
  • So wait... i had softcard on my 1520. It worked...so will wallet just work? Posted via Windows Phone Central App because my lumia is being repaired
  • Nope
  • MS late to the party? What a shock
  • Look at the Phone in the second picture. Windows 8.1 on a phone :D
  • I was in a drive through McDonalds and the guy in front, when presented with the payment machine, hovered his card over it. "Wow. Some sort of NFC" I thought. He took his card away then hovered it over the machine again. "This is taking a bit longer than I thought it would" I thought. Hover, tap, tap, hover, tap, hover, wipe card, hover, pray, beads of sweat, hover, tap, tap, hover... and finally the dumb terminal took his £3.50 "What a waste of time" I thought.
  • I've had that happen, my bank card supports this feature as well. Some payment terminals require a physical tap while other just a close wave. It can be confusing, annoying, and time consuming. But I keep using it to show the companies those do get used.
  • Didn't we already have that? My 820 has a tap to pay option in the NFC settings
  • Does that mean Wallet will eventually become a universal app?
  • I hope this is "lesson learned" for Microsoft. You don't depend on 3rd parties to give you what has become critical platform functionality. You have to own it. I honestly feel and hope that Windows 10 is really "Windows Connect The Dots" edition. They finally seem to be doing that. I hope its true.
  • Tequila??? Bish please!! Bottle of liquor, straight up please! LOL XD
  • Hopefully Discover joins in.
  • Hope td still implements paywave support via enstream as I dont trust the idea of an apple like environment where their lax with security
  • GoodBye ISIS and this ridiculous American Express Serve card!  Don't let the door hit you on the way out!
  • I think Microsoft sometimes does it right by not jumping headfirst into a new feature like Apple or Android does...they have their share of problems by doing so just to try and capture more users. Cortana is much better than Siri and the Windows OS is more fluid and reliable and much more secure than Android..if the NFC payment method in Windows 8 comes out it will be better than Apple Pay or Google Pay....no secure sim needed...direct pay to ANY NFC terminal...will be able to be used anywhere Apple Pay or Google Wallet can...all they are are standard NFC readers.
  • I guess you didn't see the Wp8 Launch? http://www.nfcworld.com/2012/06/21/316383/windows-phone-8-launch-video-details-microsofts-plans-nfc/ "if the NFC payment method in Windows 8 comes out it will be better than Apple Pay or Google Pay....no secure sim needed...direct pay to ANY NFC terminal...will be able to be used anywhere Apple Pay or Google Wallet can...all they are are standard NFC readers." Also I'm guessing you meant Windows 10 right? :p  
  • Oh my GOD GREAT NEWS.... thank you Microsoft.................by the way hey google go to hell!
  • Okay. What's so groundbreaking about this news?
  • Well the two big aspects I think is that it will not require a secure sim and it works directly with the credit card companies instead of going through a third party like softcard formally ISIS. So in theory you set up your credit card for NFC payments and you're good to go.
  • I am talking about the excitement. I know how this works. But look at the OPs excitement. He's over the roof.
  • Quit being a downer... let him enjoy the moment, such a buzz kill lol...
  • I think that every Windows 10 phone will have NFC, except the "highly" low-end ones.
  • All phones should have NFC built-in imo as they need traction and the only way to do it is have it across all the range.
  • In a $70-60 phone?
  • Yes, you need volume to be an attractive proposition. As these companies will definitely take % of the transaction. Otherwise how else would they generate revenue? A uber low % at volume is more attractive than a high % at substantially lower volume.
  • Man
    Did anywhere mention any problem with low end phones? Did I? Or do you just want to rant about how much you know about market shares?
    I simply wrote that there are less chances of $70 phones having NFC. Which part of chances you do not understand? I wrote "I think" in the beginning of my comment and I think that you don't understand what I think means.
  • I read what you said and I replied with my opinion. And to which you replied "in a $70-60 phone?". To which I further elaborated my point.
    Jeez no need to get all wound up about it... As I neither said anything derogatory or personally insulted you. Furthermore when did I say anything about market shares? Lol...
    It is evident, there is no point in continuing this discussion as for some bizarre reason you have taken offence instead of replying back with a coherent response bolstering your point ;).
  • Been using NFC payments here for ages with my bank's card (love Visa Paywave / MasterCard PayPass) it is quick and easy for low priced purchases.  I'm really looking forward to having that option through my phone. Good to see the dropping of the Carrier blocked Secure SIM
  • Regardless of the lost years of WP8.0 and the reasons why, this is fantastic news for the Windows Phone platform, given the relatively short and steep rise of Apple Pay and the loss of Softcard's IP to Google.  We no longer need a third-party app which had its own costs, we no longer need a secure SIM and best of all, we are no longer beholden to carriers who might have sought to block this tech in favour of their own paid add-on.  Win win win.
  • Sounds good, just a shame it wont arrive for 10 years haha.
  • So, GOogle picked up Softcard, so we lost it (Google you suck). Now we have to WAIT till WIndows 10 comes to our phone before we can use tap-to-pay again. Just like normal, a day late for everything in WIndows Phone. Crap, the only smartwatch for WIndows Phone is the Band (AVAILABLE TO BUY WITH SUPPORT) or a Pebble with a already outdated hack...(newer devices will give you an error of "Update your phone app to v 2.0" after every message). Windows Phone behind everything as normal....sigh...
  • Windows phone is the like the guy or girl who arrives early at the party and only to find no one is at the venue. Then leaves for say half an hour, only come back to find it is fulled to brim and thus ends up on the steps ruing the decision to leave early as the bouncer won't let any more people in... (Not that has ever happend to me lol).
  • Maybe this will bring support for timcard via nfc instead of barcode
  • How the heck did I miss this article???? lol... Any way.. finally! " It also won't require any secure SIMs from wireless carriers" that is the key sentence right there.
  • Yes...typo on my part.
  • HCE huh, I bet that makes the campus card companies such as CBORD, HID, Allegion, etc... happy.
  • What ever happened with this?  I recently upgraded to the 950, and see the tap to pay in settings but I don't seem to be able to set it up, wallet doesn't seem to work right anymore either.  Is this dead?