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You'll be able to download Spotify for Xbox One from here very soon

Rumors of Spotify's Xbox One arrival have been in full swing over the past few days, with the debut of an official app now imminent. While up until now an exclusivity deal with Sony kept the music streaming service tied down the PlayStation 4, an Xbox One solution has recently been confirmed.

Following a brief tease from Director of Programming at Xbox, Larry Hyrb, Spotify has announced its plans to share more information about the application "soon." Now, after an album of screenshots previously surfaced, a full fledged listing for Spotify (opens in new tab) has been uncovered through the Xbox Store.

Although the application isn't available to download, the store page provides further insight into the Xbox One version on the way. Features are what's expected from an official solution, including support for Spotify Connect, Spotify Premium and the full catalog of available music. Support for the console's background audio functionality is also provided, which allows sound to continue playing after leaving the application.

While many hoped for a purpose-built app that takes advantage of Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform (UWP), the store listing shows a version identical to its PlayStation 4 and Android TV counterparts. It's possible that these are simply placeholders, but it's far more likely the app is HTML-based, ported over from existing platforms. It's currently unclear how the app will perform on Xbox One, although background audio shows an effort to take advantage of the console's offerings.

Nevertheless, Xbox One users should be happy that one of the world's most widespread music streaming platforms is finally making its way to the Xbox One. We expect the app to be available in the coming days, with an official announcement supposedly on the way. For those wanting to get a peek at the listing itself, hit the link below.

See at Xbox Store (opens in new tab)

Matt Brown is Windows Central's Senior Games Editor, Xbox & PC, at Future. Following over seven years of professional consumer technology and gaming coverage, he’s focused on the world of Microsoft's gaming efforts. You can follow him on Twitter @mattjbrown.

1 Comment
  • So I am thinking... That in the long run, companies with a popular service will do themselves a disservice by offering an inferior experience by not utilizing that platform's unique capabilites. This will eventually lead consumers to look for a similiar service, which does offer this. Thusly the official service provider will either lose consumers to a competing service, or the users will not use their 1st app, but a 3rd party app. In this case, it could be that this might actually cause Xbox die hards to switch to Groove, if Spotify might not perform as intended, if it turns out it is not using the UWP.