HyperX’s new ProCast XLR Microphone is so good it has a massive 1-inch gold condenser

HyperX ProCast XLR Microphone
(Image credit: Daniel Rubino)

What you need to know

  • HyperX, now owned by HP, has announced its new ProCast XLR Microphone
  • The mic features an XLR connection, a cardioid polar pattern input, and a gold-sputtered large diaphragm condenser capsule.
  • The HyperX ProCast large diaphragm condenser mic will be available in the U.S. through Amazon, Best Buy, and the online HyperX Shop for $249.99 MSRP starting in October.

When it comes to microphones, you can go from cheap to extraordinary, depending on your needs, profession, and income level. For those who fall into “pros” or with the ability to justify dropping $250 on a PC microphone, the new HyperX ProCast XLR will do the trick.

The mic, which looks much like its others, including the excellent QuadCast, swaps out three 14mm electret condenser capsules for a massive “one-inch gold-sputtered externally-polarized condenser.”

It also drops a standard USB connector for a more professional XLR one, resulting in more precise sound quality and letting you connect to an external XLR mixer.

The 1" gold condenser is visible through the ProCast microphone grating. (Image credit: Daniel Rubino)

The ProCast frequency response remains the same (20Hz~20kHz) vs. QuadCast, but the overall quality from the large diaphragm condenser and XLR cable results in a much richer sound for vocals.

And unlike the QuadCast, which has options for stereo, omnidirectional, cardioid, and bidirectional polar patterns, the ProCast only offers cardioid. Cardioid is the most commonly used one (it’s most sensitive at 0° and least sensitive at 180°) as it focuses on the sound source.

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Header Cell - Column 0 HyperX ProCast
ElementGold-sputtered externally-polarized condenser
Diameter of diaphragm1-inch
Polar pattern(s)Cardioid
Frequency response 20Hz~20kHz
Sensitivity -38± 3dBV (1V/Pa at1kHz
Maximum input sound level 140dBSPL (THD 1%@1kHz)
Noise (RMS) -118dBV (A-weighting)
Dynamic range 123dB
Signal-to-noise ratio75dB
Output Impedance160Ω
Phantom power requirements 48V DC, 3mA typical
Weight (Microphone) 376g
Dimensions134Lx102Wx209H (mm)

HyperX also notes that the ProCast features “a switchable -10dB PAD allows the microphone to handle loud audio sources and an 80Hz high-pass filter switch helps to reduce unwanted low-end frequencies.”

Like other HyperX microphones, the ProCast also includes a snap-on metal pop filter and a built-in shock mount to reduce background noise and steady the mic.

However, to likely keep costs down, no XLR cable is included, so you’ll need to buy your own (in addition to an XLR USB mixer, like the popular Beringer U-Phoria UMC22). Likewise, there is no base stand to connect to the 3/8-inch and 5/8-inch mount adapter.

Availability

(Image credit: Daniel Rubino)

The HyperX ProCast large diaphragm condenser mic will be available in the U.S. through Amazon, Best Buy, and the online HyperX Shop for $249.99 MSRP starting in October.

If you’d like to hear the ProCast in action, tune into the Windows Central Podcast this Friday at 1:30 PM ET, as I’ll be using it, while co-host Zac Bowden will be using the HyperX QuadCast, letting you compare the two.

For those on a budget, check out HyperX's new $100 DuoCast USB microphone, complete with RGB lighting. And for more ideas, see our best microphone for streaming guide.

Daniel Rubino
Editor-in-chief

Daniel Rubino is the Editor-in-chief of Windows Central, head reviewer, podcast co-host, and analyst. He has been here covering Microsoft since 2007 when this site was called WMExperts (and later Windows Phone Central). His interests include Windows, Microsoft Surface, laptops, next-gen computing, and for some reason, watches. Before all this tech stuff, he worked on a Ph.D. in linguistics and ran the projectors at movie theaters, which has done absolutely nothing for his career.