Microsoft Teams Content from camera is here, along with a new MS 365 licensing option

Microsoft Teams PC
Microsoft Teams PC (Image credit: Windows Central)

What you need to know

  • The new Microsoft 365 A1 for devices license is aimed at students and educators.
  • Microsoft Teams Content from camera is also for students, enabling a new kind of whiteboard learning.
  • The new Teams feature is the most recent in a long line of education-attuned Teams features.

Those in the field of education looking for new licensing options and Microsoft Teams tools are in for a good Thursday, as on September 30, 2021, Microsoft announced those exact things.

First up, there's the new Microsoft 365 A1 for devices license. Here's what Microsoft had to say about it: "The Microsoft 365 A1 for devices license costs $38 per device for up to six years, providing more for students and educators relative to competitive offerings at the same price. Microsoft 365 A1 for devices will allow you to support student learning experiences on desktop Office apps with or without an Internet connection."

The company notes that it has a host of tools for educating kids from which you can derive value from licensing its goods. There's Reflect, Minecraft: Education Edition, and plenty more items at educators' disposal courtesy of Microsoft.

The second news item is Microsoft Teams Content from camera, an oddly capitalized and titled new inclusion that falls into the same category of Teams tools as the Reading Progress app did.

Teams Content On Camera

Source: Microsoft (Image credit: Source: Microsoft)

Here's how Microsoft describes the new feature: "Microsoft Teams Content from camera gives educators and students the ability to share physical handwriting from a whiteboard or document using their laptop's camera. Students will be able to see the whiteboard in real-time, even if their educator is standing in front of the whiteboard."

To learn more about the new Teams tool and Microsoft 365 licensing option, check out Microsoft's blog post.

Robert Carnevale is the News Editor for Windows Central. He's a big fan of Kinect (it lives on in his heart), Sonic the Hedgehog, and the legendary intersection of those two titans, Sonic Free Riders. He is the author of Cold War 2395. Have a useful tip? Send it to robert.carnevale@futurenet.com.

1 Comment
  • MSFT should probably get out of the business because if they think that x=0 then they need to go back to grade school. (x=1 not zero).