Microsoft Teams' VaxApp makes it easy to monitor employee vaccination status

The Visitor’s Center at Microsoft Headquarters campus is pictured July 17, 2014 in Redmond, Washington.
The Visitor’s Center at Microsoft Headquarters campus is pictured July 17, 2014 in Redmond, Washington. (Image credit: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images for Microsoft)

What you need to know

  • Microsoft Teams' new VaxApp has arrived on GitHub.
  • It's a means for employees to share whether they've been vaccinated.
  • It exists to help companies comply with the U.S. government's mandate that organizations with over 100 employees must show that their employees are vaccinated or regularly test negative for COVID.

Microsoft Teams is constantly expanding its services to address every kind of workforce need under the sun, and it has now stretched to cover one more sector: Government vaccination mandates. Teams now has VaxApp, a tool with which employees can attest to having had a vaccination.

VaxApp comes in response to the U.S. government's new rule that employers with over a hundred employees need to verify that their workers have been vaccinated or are testing negative for COVID on a weekly basis. Now, organizations utilizing Microsoft Teams have an easy, PowerApp-based way to get their employees' statuses accounted for.

You can check out VaxApp over on GitHub, where you'll also find the full deployment guide for how to jab it into your organization's Teams infrastructure. These are the key features of VaxApp:

  • Submit an Attestation: Easily submit an attestation for yourself or on behalf of another person.
  • View Attestations: Easily review your history of attestation submissions.
  • Admin Console: Export attestation data for simplified reporting.

Microsoft's already made its own stance on vaccinations clear, so the company's rollout of technology to help monitor the situation can be seen as an extension of its existing policy.

Robert Carnevale is the News Editor for Windows Central. He's a big fan of Kinect (it lives on in his heart), Sonic the Hedgehog, and the legendary intersection of those two titans, Sonic Free Riders. He is the author of Cold War 2395. Have a useful tip? Send it to robert.carnevale@futurenet.com.

15 Comments
  • Another tool to ignore...
  • Exactly what I was thinking, but not about the subject of the article. 😂
  • Oh, people are going to rush out for that. Lmao. Where I work I will fill out the form and digitally sign it, but I'll be damned if I'm sharing my status on what is essentially a social network.
  • Actually I think a lot of people will want to broadcast that they have the vaccine. It's a big welcome sign for in-person meetings. For people who are high risk or live with such people, they may only choose in person meetings with people who have the vaccine badge. The same logic could be applied to the flu (which is much less deadly than Covid but still kills). Vaccines are not just about your own personal risk. They're about reducing risk for other people. Broadcasting vaccine status can help people manage their own risk levels at work. I think it's perfectly reasonable. It's also a sign of respect for your coworkers. It shows you care about their health.
  • Given the laissez-faire attitude many people seem to have regarding posting of personal information on social media platforms, I don't doubt that those so inclined will not think twice about broadcasting their decision on whether or not to get vaccinated. This doesn't necessarily imply a particular motive, nor should it be expected to become the norm. Becoming vaccinated IS about managing personal risk. You can't make any assumptions about your environment in a public place; you can only make sensible preparations to ensure your own safety without expecting anything of those around you. Anyone particularly at risk during this pandemic have no more right to expect everyone around them in a communal space to be vaccinated than does someone afflicted by a nut allergy to expect that no one around them will consume nuts in their presence. And really, expecting the sacrifice of personal -- and some might say highly sensitive -- information such as one's health status as a "sign of respect" is anything but.
  • Not sure how all of this would work when you can legally not inform your employer of your medical choices and they can't legally fire you for any medical choice because of discrimination laws.
  • I think you are confusing choices and conditions.
  • As with the previous 200+ years in the US, vaccines can in fact be mandated in a variety of situations. (Ask George Washington.) That's why the Supreme Court refuses to even hear cases about it. Vaccines don't just reduce your risk, they reduce others' risk. It's not just about yourself, it's about your community, which includes the people you work with. If you choose not to get a Covid vaccine, you are putting people around you at risk. Same with the flu. Same with mumps, measles and rubella. Discrimination laws are not the story here.
  • So what if people don't use Teams? We have teams at work, but the majority of people don't use it. Not that we are forced to have the jab here in the U.K unless you work in care.
  • They really are taking this pandemic and vaccine stuff beyond reasonable levels.
    I'm all for vaccines but come on...
  • I'm with you. I wasn't going to take it initially, but decided to do so a few months after it's release. I think people should ultimately have the choice to be vaccinated or not, not be forced to by mandates and conditions. There are legitimate reasons for people wanting to vaccinate and not to. Not everyone decides to get the flu shot and people die from it more than COVID, yet, they don't call the flu deaths. Many people have preexisting conditions and Flu or COVID may be contributing factors. Even people who have tested positive for COVID, but recovered from it are still considered COVID deaths, if they died from other preexisting causes. As a result, the number of COVID deaths are greatly exaggerated, in my opinion. I don't say this to speak against the vaccination, but these mandates aren't necessarily a good thing. Will people be forced to take the Flu vaccination or other vaccinations, at some point? My concern is that these mandates will usher in other mandates that will piggyback on current ones. Just FYI, I've seen enough death certs to support my opinion on this topic. So, no... I don't have statistical data or references to share. Just know it's job related.
  • "I think people should ultimately have the choice to be vaccinated or not, not be forced to by mandates and conditions." If you don't get vaccinated, you are risking other people's health. This is a communicable disease. This is not rocket science : it's not just about you, and you are not just hurting yourself if you don't get vaccinated. "the number of COVID deaths are greatly exaggerated, in my opinion." You are full of it and making things up. Stop spreading misinformation.
  • First, I'm not disregarding the fact that COVID is real or that people should consider getting the vaccination. Secondly, I'm not pulling stuff out of thin air. I'm stating what I observed in my work and I clearly stated it was my opinion, based on what I observed in my work. I also stated that I don't have verified statistical data to support my thoughts, hence, my opinion. I'm not stating it as fact, just merely an observation on a small scale, as I am just one person. Which is why I have my OPINION. If you cannot descern the difference between someone expressing their thought and opinions, that is a problem. Since when expressing opinions, thoughts or concern considered misinformation? Now, if someone wants to take what I said, when I clearly stated it was an opinion and reuse it as fact, that is also an issue.
  • Andrew. Dude what? Get yours facts right before you make comments.
  • Beyond the obvious points, it's also the case that the majority of business DO NOT USE TEAMS.