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Power On: The six-part series documenting Xbox history is now on YouTube

Xbox Power On Documentary Image
Xbox Power On Documentary Image (Image credit: Xbox)

What you need to know

  • Power-On was announced on November 15th to talk about the history of Xbox to the present.
  • Made up of six videos at forty minutes each, the videos take us through the history of the Xbox brand and where it is today.
  • It's available to watch for free on YouTube right away.

Microsoft announced Power-On last month during the 20th anniversary Xbox stream to celebrate the history of Xbox. The six-part series aims to take fans on a journey through the past, present and future of Xbox and as of earlier today, the entire series is up on Xbox's official YouTube channel ready to watch.

Above is the first part of the six-part series. You can watch the rest of it by seeing the playlist here. The series is definitely worth watching if you are a fan of the gaming world as it chronicles the highs and lows of Microsoft's journey into one of the biggest risks they ever took. The series laments at all the lessons they learned from their previous consoles and it made the Xbox Series consoles possible today.

As an official Microsoft series, you get a more in-depth look at the history of the company and the Xbox brand because employees are talking about their own experiences of working with Xbox which is a rarity in these kinds of videos. This approach adds an extra level of detail. If you're looking to enhance your knowledge about the video game industry, this is a good place to start.

Microsoft also put up the series guide on the official Xbox website (opens in new tab) if you wish to watch it anywhere else. The series is available on six major video streaming platforms in 31 languages. This helps make sure that it's accessible to more people.

2 Comments
  • About to take a long flight; would've been nice to be able to d/l the series and watch it on by Surface Duo 2
  • Watched Episode 1 and 2 last night. Very interesting how things began falling in place. What surprised me were the number of people who began at the infancy of the console and then left so early following Microsoft's commitment to building a new console. Some left without any real explanation, others obviously left for other challenges. Very few started in the late 90's and stuck with it for more than 5 years.