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What reviewers are saying about the Ryzen 2nd generation processors

AMD
AMD

If, like me, the announcement of the 2nd generation Ryzen processors from AMD pricked your ears with excitement, you've no doubt been scouring the web for as much information as you can find.

The majority of the online reviews have focused on the range-topping Ryzen 7 2700X, but for a lot of people that's the one they're most interested in. I haven't taken delivery of my own yet (boy am I looking forward to rebuilding my PC), so I'm yet to experience it first hand.

But there's plenty of smart people out there who have. Here's what some of them are saying about the latest from AMD.

Tom's Hardware

The folks at Tom's Hardware give a worthy shoutout to the stock cooler that AMD is now including with the Ryzen 2700X, the Wraith Prism, and its RGB lighting.

AMD's Ryzen 7 2700X is another big step forward for AMD. The improved boost algorithms add to Ryzen's performance advantage in heavily-threaded applications, while the increased frequency and reduced memory latency provide a boost to a wide range of workloads. AMD delivered on the pricing front, too, and the bundled LED cooler and storage tiering software adds to the value.

They found a worthy performance improvement over the Ryzen 7 1800X at a lower price, and extra brownie points for being backward compatible with X370 motherboards.

Linus Tech Tips

Why wouldn't you review a processor in a kitchen? Linus Tech Tips took a look at both the 2700X and the Ryzen 5 2600X, even doing a touch of overclocking. Because you know you want to overclock your Ryzen.

Trusted Reviews

The Trusted Reviews team are fairly grounded on Ryzen's 2nd generation chips, in so far as they're not quite the game changers that their predecessors were. But did they really need to be anything more than just a good upgrade?

The new Ryzen 2 processors aren't quite the revelation of the first-generation chips – but faster clock speeds, greater overclockability, AM4 motherboard compatibility and competitive pricing make them well worth a look.

Improved overclocking gets a big thumbs up, but it's worth highlighting the added power draw over the 1st generation and that in outright gaming performance, it's still a little behind Intel.

Hardware Unboxed

The 2700X is exciting, as is the 2600X, but what about one of the cheaper 2nd generation Ryzen processors? Hardware Unboxed takes a deep dive into the Ryzen 5 2600, potentially a terrific $200 processor.

Hexus

The Hexus review also takes in the new top-end Ryzen 5 processor, the 2600X, and highlights some important points. Namely that it's pretty much impossible now to buy a bad consumer CPU.

What it really boils down to is your main usage scenarios. For a fixed financial outlay, content creators ought to favour 2nd Generation Ryzen - it's Zen done right - others may see the light-load and lower-res gaming virtues of Intel as winning attributes. Whatever you choose, they will all provide a good, solid platform.

The consensus seems to fit with other reviewers that if you want the best outright gaming performance, you're still going to be best with an Intel Core i7-8700K. Content creators and those that are OK with sacrificing a few FPS in their PC games will love the Ryzen 7 2700X.

Hardware Canucks

Eber over at Hardware Canucks hasn't just focused on whether the 2700X is good, but how good it is compared to its predecessor.

PC World

The PC World review team has high praise indeed for the latest Ryzen processors.

Higher clock speeds and a massive multi-threading advantage push AMD's CPU performance to new highs. The bundled Wraith Prism cooler and overall polish push it over the top. In the battle of Intel and AMD's flagship processors, the clear winner today is the Ryzen 7 2700X.

Again, it's interesting to see the included cooler get some positive attention, along with the obvious, and necessary, comparisons to Intel.

Your reviews

If you've managed to get your hands on a new 2nd generation Ryzen processor yet and have your own thoughts to share on it, be sure to drop them into the comments below!

Richard Devine is an Editor at Windows Central. A former Project Manager and long-term tech addict, he joined Mobile Nations in 2011 and has been found on Android Central and iMore as well as Windows Central. Currently you'll find him covering all manner of PC hardware and gaming, and you can follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

9 Comments
  • Zen+ is a nice refresh of the Zen1 chips, but not really a candidate for a Zen1 upgrade. That'll come with the 7nm Zen2 chips. Zen+ doesn't really add enough to be worth the outlay right now if you have a Zen1.
  • I believe it's mainly for those without the first gen. I'm actually in the market to upgrade my 4 year old video card and may even look at an upgrade to my Mobo and processor. I currently have an i7 5930k with a Radeon r9 290x GPU. I want to get back to PC gaming.
  • The thing for me is that I don't want to upgrade until I can do a complete upgrade, including GPU. With Vega prices where they are, it's going to be a while until I upgrade.
  • Vega GPUs are way overpriced because they're pretty good at mining, but nVidia GPU prices are getting lower now. You can get a GTX1080 from Galax/Gigabyte for around 520-560€, which is not bad at all, all things considered.
  • Ryzen 2nd gen absolutely delivered. Not really for a 1st gen upgrade, but insanely attractive to people with older CPUs. With XFR2 you don't even need to mess with overclocking it does it all for you automatically out of the box. Ryzen 1 was a bit lacking in gaming but great for productivity/multi tasking. These new chips are amazing in both aspects.
  • In terms of gaming, as time progresses so will the optimisations for Ryzen. However Nvidia knows this and they want to throttle that with their asinine geforce programme.
  • Totally agree, tired of all these single/low threaded games. Although its getting slightly better. I have a 1700 but hate when a game only uses 1 out of 16 threads.
  • Am probably going to update my ryzen 3 1200 next year when ryzen 5 2600 drops its retail price by over 30%.
  • Great to see 11% gain in spread over a 1800x, I say i say the 2700x delivered and much better price! The 8700k is only better in 1 - 4 core performance in my opinion shows old game tech! As we have more cores these days.