Skip to main content

Windows apps can now run as PWAs on Chromebooks through Cameyo

Samsung Chromebook
Samsung Chromebook (Image credit: Windows Central)

What you need to know

  • Cameyo can now deliver virtual Windows applications as Progressive Web Apps.
  • The new option to run apps as PWAs should make Windows apps feel more native on Chromebooks.
  • Cameyo allows users and organizations to run Windows apps on Chromebooks or through the web from other devices.

Windows applications should now feel more native on the best Chromebooks, thanks to a new feature from Cameyo. The new functionality rolls out today, and it allows Cameyo users to run any Windows app as a PWA on a Chromebook. Cameyo could already run Windows apps on Chromebooks and through the web, but the new option lets people pin PWAs of Windows apps to the taskbar, which should make the experience feel more like the application is installed locally.

Also starting today, the Google Admin console supports force installing and pinning apps to the Chromebook taskbar. This should make it easier to set up Chromebooks for members of staff. Users can also pin PWAs to the taskbar themselves.

"Our implementation of Cameyo PWAs evolves the user experience from a SaaS-like experience to a native application experience - to the point that users wouldn't know that their apps aren't installed locally on their device," said Founder and CTO at Cameyo Eyal Dotan. "Better yet, this seamless user experience doesn't come at the expense of making IT's life more difficult. The natural user experience is matched by incredibly powerful IT management tools designed to put even more power and control into IT's hands."

Cameyo is a Chrome Enterprise Recommended solution, meaning it has been optimized for Chrome OS. It can also work with web browsers on other devices.

In addition to allowing people to run Windows apps on non-Windows hardware, Cameyo highlights the security advantages of using its service. It has built-in support for HTTPS, single sign-on, and separates apps from a device's operating system.

Sean Endicott
News Writer and apps editor

Sean Endicott brings nearly a decade of experience covering Microsoft and Windows news to Windows Central. He joined our team in 2017 as an app reviewer and now heads up our day-to-day news coverage. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com (opens in new tab).

1 Comment
  • Have always said PWA are Google’s Trojan horse for ChromeOS. Games are still a gap, but with Steam now entering alpha, maybe it won’t be much longer before they really start to make sense.