Skip to main content

Windows 'phone' isn't dead, Part IV: A future of partnerships and a possible Surface Phone

Forty years ago Microsoft founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen had the dream of putting a PC in every home and on every desk. Forty years and a 1.5-billion PC install base later Microsoft dominates the PC space with over 90% market share. It would have been impossible for Redmond to attain this level of success alone. They needed partners. And just as partnerships were key to Microsoft's success in the PC space, they are equally as important for them in the smartphone space.

Looking Back

When Microsoft entered the smartphone space anew with Windows Phone 7 in 2010 they did so with the support of long-time partner HTC, industry behemoth Samsung and mobile contender LG. In February of 2011 Microsoft entered into an alliance with Nokia, a former formidable force in the industry, which positioned Microsoft's struggling OS on Nokia's well-branded, albeit struggling, smartphone hardware. Nokia's Windows Phone's soon dominated the platform's representation in the industry with over 90% of all Windows Phones being Nokia Lumias.

Like a clown fish and a coral reef, the Microsoft-and-Nokia relationship eventually evolved into a symbiosis where Microsoft's mobile OS could not viably exist in the market without Nokia's hardware. With Microsoft's controversial purchase of Nokia's smartphone division in 2013, Lumia's dominance of Windows Phone was all but solidified and seemingly unintentionally signaled to an industry of partners and potential partners, "there's no room for you."

In July 2014 Microsoft's CEO Satya Nadella signaled the impending Nokia write-down (taking a delayed loss on a project or acquisition which has turned out to be less valuable than initially thought). This write-down repositioned the company in line with Nadella's vision where Microsoft's smartphone strategy would operate temporarily from a retrenched position. By exiting the general consumer space with a planned return two years later while targeting fans, enterprise and value consumers, Microsoft's focus is now turned toward nurturing the ecosystem that supports its mobile platform.

Microsoft is determined to have a strong mobile presence and realizes that it's impossible to attain success on its own.

In addition to refining the mobile OS and developing the tools to bring more apps to Windows, Microsoft's efforts during this state of gestation have "course corrected" the firm's departure from what made the firm successful in the PC space: partnerships.

Though Satya Nadella was clear that if no one else made Windows Phones, then Microsoft would, this assertion from the firm's leadership was more an expression of the "phones" importance to the Universal Windows Platform rather than an acknowledgment that Microsoft was keen on tackling the industry alone. Microsoft is determined to have a strong mobile presence and realizes that it's impossible for them to attain any meaningful level of success on its own. They need partners.

In this piece, I dive into Microsoft's strategy of passing the "Windows phone baton" to OEM partners to position them as the leading representatives of Microsoft's mobile platform. The information I share was gleaned from sources from Microsoft's Windows and OEM divisions. This content provides a fuller view of how Microsoft and OEM partners are positioning the firm's mobile strategy along a path that sees partners taking a more prominent place in heralding Microsoft's mobile OS throughout the industry.

BETTER TOGETHER

VAIO Phone Biz

Microsoft is currently retrenched from the general smartphone market, but that is not an indication that Windows phone is dead. As Nadella made clear in a July 2015 memo to employees (opens in new tab), Microsoft is committed to phone. The firm's focus has simply shifted from conquering device categories to "the mobility of the human experience and how Windows can manifest in the right ways."

As Microsoft works on building the ecosystem that ensures its ability to facilitate managing a user's digital experiences; they are also fortifying relationships that are bringing more Windows phones into the ecosystem. HP, VAIO , Alcatel , and Trinity have all recently announced new Windows 10 Mobile devices.

These phones represent affordable, mid- as well as high-end Windows 10 devices which demonstrate the Continuum-enabled power and versatility of Windows 10 Mobile. These devices are, of course, joining Microsoft's first-party Lumias as representatives of the Windows Mobile platform. Microsoft's commitment to move the platform forward through deep collaboration with partners is evident:

Moving forward, our focus, together with our partners, will be on delivering the most productive Windows-based smartphones on the planet, and truly unique and differentiated experiences for Windows fans and business customers.

Keeping "phone" alive

Microsoft's growing list of partners sends a clear signal regarding the vitality of Windows Mobile. One source said it this way: "Windows phones are very much alive fueled by innovation we see in Windows 10."

Still, Redmond has the challenge of keeping Windows phone "alive in the minds" of the industry, particularly during this retrenched period while the ecosystem is in a "nurturing and growth" stage.

Windows phones are very much alive fueled by innovation we see in Windows 10.

As we approach the debut of an anticipated Surface Phone approximately eight months from now, Microsoft would not have us forget that the last four months has brought us four first-party devices and innovative experiences like Continuum and Windows Hello. The Lumias 550, 650, 950 and 950XL Windows 10 phones are touted by the company as "the most productive on the planet."

Through these devices, the innovative experiences they bring and the 200 million Windows 10 (and growing) devices in use today, Microsoft hopes to keep fans, and the industry engaged until (and beyond) the debut of their next high-end flagship.

Of course, the anticipated Surface Phone is expected to bring "Surface-flavored" hardware innovation and hardware and software synergy that will excite the industry. Coupled with anticipated software announcements from BUILD regarding the app bridges, Microsoft's plans for the Xamarin purchase and the next Redstone update, the Surface Phone's hardware chops will hopefully be positioned to reap the benefits of coming ecosystem and software enhancements. If this anticipated device follows the path that was blazed before it by the Surface and the Surface Book, it could be a first generation device that changes our concept of a "phone."

If so, it will be well positioned as a representative of the Universal Windows Platform which has seen over 200 million installs, making it the fastest growing Windows ever. As I shared in the previous piece, Microsoft's CEO Satya Nadella made the Windows 10 upgrade free to benefit the firm's mobile business.

As a growing pool of users experiences the seamless mobility of experiences across Windows devices, Microsoft is hoping that as a user contemplates their next smartphone, they will seek out the consistency a Windows phone will offer. Of course, Microsoft is also hoping their strategy will entice developers who see the benefits of building for an install base approaching 1 billion users. One source was keen to share that "Windows universal apps can even be made into holograms."

Of course, if a developer comes to Windows for HoloLens, the path ultimately leads to phone. That said, there are systemic barriers to Windows phone adoption:

  • A consumer's personal and social investment in competitor devices (iPhone & Android)
  • Sales associates at carrier stores steering consumers away from Windows phone.
  • Negative press (and the "Windows phone is dead" meme)

We've been assured that Microsoft is confident that as people are using and loving Windows 10, the consistency that the platform allows across devices, including phone will appeal to consumers. It is my impression that Redmond is very committed to phone, one spokesperson indicated that "Phone is key to bringing Windows 10 to more people."

All Aboard

As partnerships with PC manufacturers were critical to Microsoft's establishing of itself in the PC space, the company acknowledges that partnering with the Windows devices ecosystem is an essential component of the firm's mobile strategy. The company's goal is to deliver the "most productive Windows-based smartphones on the planet."

To do this, their approach to working with partners is customer-focused. Microsoft realizes that the entire Windows ecosystem thrives when customers love the product:

We're changing the way we build and deliver Windows in order to better meet the needs of our customers and partners, and we think the result will be high-value experiences that delight customers.

Through Windows 10 innovations like Continuum for Phones and Windows Hello, features such as Cortana, the consistency of experiences across devices and more Microsoft is working with partners to deliver a more personal computing and captivating device experience.

OEMs will build devices that meet the needs of their customers — be they enterprise or general consumers.

As a company that prides itself on providing the tools for others to get things done, Microsoft provides the support and the platform to help partners serve their customers. As such, OEMs will build devices that meet the needs of their customers. Whether those customers are the enterprise targeted by HP with the Elite X3 or consumers targeted by Alcatel with the affordable Fierce XL.

Moreover, Microsoft's goal is to continue building their own phones for fans, value consumers and the enterprise while they help OEMs populate the broader market. The firm "is excited to drive innovation forward on Windows and that includes Windows 10 Mobile". One spokesperson expressed Microsoft's commitment this way:

We'll continue building our own phones, and work with OEMS to build out the overall Windows Phone portfolio with more price points and geos.

The company also added that it sees each of these categories as very important and that it is working with manufacturers to ensure that there will be a range of choices of Windows mobile devices that fit into each of these categories. Microsoft's goal is to ensure customers have a wide range of choices to find the Windows device that best fits their individual needs. And OEMs are making decisions on the types of devices they want to produce to best fit their respective business needs.

Down the road

We've seen Acer, VAIO and others commit to partnering with Microsoft to bring Windows phones to market. Many have pondered if industry powerhouse Samsung might join the growing number of Windows phone OEMs. Naturally we anticipate that more OEMs will continue to adopt Windows phone, and sources tell me that Microsoft is looking for more new phones from partners around the globe. It will be interesting to see if the likes of Samsung is among that number.

If so, as a marketing powerhouse it will be interesting to see how aggressive the firm will promote its Windows device(s). Particularly since sources relayed to me that because Microsoft's marketing of Windows benefits all devices in the Windows ecosystem OEMs don't get additional support from Redmond to promote their devices.

In the face of negative press and social media buzz that is declaring, "Windows phone is dead", bringing Windows phone into a positive light will be an uphill battle. Consequently, aggressive marketing from Microsoft and its partners could go a long way in changing the perception of the platform. In response to the company's view of this precarious position, Microsoft directs our attention to the undeniable strength of the momentum from OEM partners in support of Windows Mobile.

A platform with dedicated users, consistent development and invested partners is not dead. Microsoft and a growing list of partners seem to agree.

Where does Surface Phone fit in?

First-party devices are integral to Microsoft's strategy for demonstrating optimal hardware and software synergy between devices and Windows 10. High-end devices like the Lumia 950/XL and to a greater degree the anticipated Surface Phone, represent the epitome of what we envision as a flagship aspirational device.

I envision that the anticipated "Surface Phone" will not only share the aesthetics of the current Surface devices but also the "theme" of those devices as well. I believe it will exist in two categories as is the standard for devices in the Surface family. The Surface is a tablet and a laptop. The Surface Book is a laptop and a digital clipboard. The "Surface Phone" will be a Continuum enabled phone that I imagine will dance the line of a mini-tablet with a focus as a digital notepad with an included pen and possibly an attachable keyboard of sorts.

Whatever its design, Microsoft is clearly focused on creating categories. Microsoft is just as tight-lipped about the "Surface Phone" as they were about HoloLens and the Surface Book. And that's ok.

At any rate, this category-defining device will likely debut at the end of this year, so that by early to mid-2017 we will likely see OEM partners embracing this new category and emulating it as they have with 2-in-1's. Microsoft is nurturing relationships with OEM partners now in preparation for these events:

We believe our approach to hardware development is complementary to our partners. We focus on investing in hardware experiences that can reinvent categories - and then we work with our partners to bring technology to the world. Surface is a great example of the creation of a category, which has created great opportunities for our partners as well.

Analysis

Clearly Microsoft's mobile "phone" strategy is on a path that emulates its decades-long strategy that brought it success in the PC arena. Of course, in an industry where dozens of OEMs have embraced Android and have made it the most-used operating system in the world, Microsoft's growing OEM partnerships strategy doesn't exist in the "vacuum" its PC endeavors matured within.

That said, few Android manufactures enjoy the reach and market presence entities such as Samsung enjoy in this highly competitive smartphone space. Considering that profits even for large Android manufactures are relatively low a growing number of OEMs may see the wisdom in diversifying their product portfolios by adding a Windows based product line.

OEM partners will play a critical role in propelling the platform into the mainstream.

It is clear that Microsoft is pressing forward with its Windows phone strategy with both its first-party offerings and with manufacturers who see the value of Windows as part of their corporate vision. Moreover, as OEMs position Windows phones within their corporate strategies, they will be incentivized to promote these devices as part of their strategic agenda. As such OEM partners will play a critical role in propelling the platform into the mainstream. For enthusiasts who contend that that the platform is not progressing in the absence of a high-end first-party device such as the anticipated Surface Phone this is an important point to remember.

Consider this: When we state that Microsoft has 90% of the PC space we are stating that that space is dominated by Microsoft's personal computing platform not it's first-party hardware. In the same manner it is Microsoft's strategy that OEMs will become the dominant representatives of the Windows Mobile platform as Microsoft simply sets the standard of optimal software and hardware synergy via first-party hardware. As such we must change our perspective from the "Lumia dominant" view that Microsoft's first-party hardware equals Windows phone as the paradigm shifts to a more OEM dominated reality.

We must change our perspective from the "Lumia dominant" view that Microsoft's first-party hardware equals Windows phone.

On this note it will be interesting to see if former allies such as HTC and Samsung will eventually fully embrace Windows phone. Though HTC's brand power has waned in recent years, it is still a formidable ally. Moreover, Samsung is obviously not averse to participating in Microsoft's ecosystem, having just released the Galaxy Tab Pro S and their long-running series of PC laptops. Given Samsung's corporate and consumer influence, a family of enterprise or consumer-focused Windows 10 devices such as a phone, 2-in-1 and accessories is something I'm certain fans would love to see. It is certainly the type of partnership that would help further validate Microsoft's mobile efforts in the eyes of the industry.

In the absence of these powerful global brands, we can rest assured that the smaller partners who have embraced the platform do bring value to the ecosystem. Though they may not have the global influence we enthusiasts would love to see, their local influence in their respective regions is sure to have a meaningful impact on the platform.

One final point. In relation to my question about Microsoft's marketing support of third-party Windows phones. Microsoft's response to my question surmised that any marketing of Windows affects all Windows device. This, of course, is true. However, I'm sure that many fans would agree that once Microsoft reenters the consumer space with the consumer facing first-party flagship "phone" we hope to see it will be accompanied by device-specific ads akin to the TV spots Microsoft uses to promote the Surface or Surface Book.

Until then I think we can, at least, find solace in the marketing of OEM specific Windows phones that is sure to arise as the space becomes increasingly competitive as more OEMs embrace the platform. Hmmmm. Manufacturers promoting their Windows phone against another manufacturers Windows phone? Now that's a good problem to have.

A big thanks to Microsoft for taking the time to answer my questions!

Jason L Ward is a columnist at Windows Central. He provides unique big picture analysis of the complex world of Microsoft. Jason takes the small clues and gives you an insightful big picture perspective through storytelling that you won't find *anywhere* else. Seriously, this dude thinks outside the box. Follow him on Twitter at @JLTechWord. He's doing the "write" thing!

124 Comments
  • Thanks for reading folks! What are your thoughts about OEMs taking the lead for the Windows Mobile platform? Also does confirm a Q4 Surface Phone? Lets talk!
  • I think OEM's are the way forward for tremendous success for MS, but at the same time, Microsoft needs to set the standard in the industry for it's partners to follow. Allow me to explain, the surface pro 4 has 4 generations down become not only the trend setter, but also a benchmark of quality, craftsmanship and innovation to show the true power of windows 10. As more and more features are added with the Redstone wave, i think a surface phone becomes critical and needs to set the stage for the next innovation in mobile commuting. While i do believe apps are very very important for the success of any platform, pure innovation will always be a catalyst for app growth and consumer demand. What do you guys think?? .. P.s. Great peice of work again Jason :p Posted from Windows Central for Windows 10
  • Really good series, I fully agree with you. Microsoft need to pave the way with the Lumia or surface phone and keep trying as they are to bring more oem over with there phones, only thing I hope is it don't become as flooded as what the Android based phone market is, there is just to many sub par phones pushed out and windows 10 is better then that
  • Thank man! Yeah so far what the OEMs are bringing to the table look good! -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • The OEMs don't want to run stock mobile OS. How many Android OEMs are promoting stock Android OS?
  • I agree with your point, however I only buy stock android devices after making the mistake of initially getting an OEM. 
    And I think there are a lot of people who feel the same, so maybe with Windows 10 mobile they will learn from the mistakes on other devices ?
  • @Jason Ward, Writing a comment 5 days before an article is published must mean you have a time travelling Delorean :P. Soo when are you going to write a piece about the DMC-12? :P As you clearly have a lot of "time" on your hands, haha.
  • Hey @TechFreak Shhhhhhhh. Don't tell anybody. You'll cause a paradox.:-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • Oh, crumbs I didn't think about that... by posting that initial comment I may very well have done.. oh dear... :P.
  • Tl;Dr soon™ Posted via the Windows Central App
  • Redstone will add some great features which will make the OS at par with android & ios.. OEMs are taking interest to make WPs.. The lack of apps/games makes it dead.. Once the app gap is filled the OS is ready to rock
  • Commenting without reading ha? Meh
  • Edited
  • "Coming Soon" !!!
  • Oh yes.. They should adop it as a company slogan...
  • Lack of sales, too. If you add tons of 3rd party OEM's yet their total sales amount ot a rounding error, is that really a sign of a healthy ecosystem?
  • Theres are some points why WP is lacking behind
    1. Hardware- you get very bad hardware specifications for what you pay.. (8gb internal storage, underpowered processor,ram,etc)
    2. Software- Not pleasing.. They should add some insane features which will make people buy WP without hesitating.. I hope redstone brings some good features.
    3. Advertisement- their tv ads are worse. They show continuum(cmon who knows what continuun is expect wp users) and office apps,onedrive.
  • your points is right but i can added more details 1. OEM can't make a good spec phone with good hardware because... the license already expensive. making android phone or firefox os phone or ubuntu touch phone only cost so low and OEM can spend it more in the hardware, but microsoft don't want you to do that, they want high licensing price even for a cheap plastic lumia. it is microsoft it self that dont want to make their phone to success, in chinese strategy gain a little but sell alot to introduce your brand and loyalist and penetrate more market. i want to bet if microsoft would not let microsoft windows 98 and xp to be pirated everywhere in the world they will not as big as today, same with PSX sony playstation, they will not as big as today if they don't let their games to be copied freely in the very beginning. its free promotion and cheap marketing oh but maybe microsoft market strategies can't see that.lol 2. software are trying to be different but inconsistent, like people hub. i bought my lumia just because of people hub, but then microsoft never go on with it again. they try hard in camera app and tech but just give up because it will not do with low spec chip and camera lens their use in most of their line up.lol metro style is usefull but why not give it circle or other style so people can customize their own home screen, i know lot of girl who want hello kitty at the corner of their screen or son goku animation on their homescreen. they try to do this and that but inconsistent with their choises and not represented user oriented and show that they lack of ideas. steve jobs will create his homescreen and give the teams to make it into the iphone, but team WP just don't have leadership who can lead them while joe balfiore busy playing with his shiny iphone. lol the redstone doesn't have to invent new features for their phone, they only have to pay some royalty like simple USB OTG, MHL tv-out, miracast which is not a new tech in android world but no lumia have it lol. as simple as that, oh but joe too busy twitting with his iphone. 3. advertising? no need. today is internet everywhere, people will go to phone site and look on the specs and look on what a phone can do. ads only show mommy and daddy smiling while texting with lumia, it will not drive me to the store. i need to look at what that lumia can do in the specs first and how it run in real world, just banging that this phone is power effient, it less lag then android or the os doesn't need more ram or faster cpu will not pull my wallet. show me it has 2 RAM, mid spec snapdragon 600+, 300ppi minimum screen, 3000mah battery, 12mp camera support on miracast, mhl, fast charging, usb otg (it all common android mid range btw) and slap it with affordable price this is advertisement, no need for flush those million in media, just give their phone good specs and good abilities, today user not gonna using their phone only for hallo and sms like in the old nokia phone, we want more connectable feature from our phone to bigger screen or to other phone and tablet, can be use as mini portable pc to control arduino or raspberry pi or drone or whatever high tech should be doing, oh but no joe to busy talking on the phone using his shiny iphone.   4. microsoft can be success in smartphone world if they not bangging their last hope on enterprise phone only just like BB when they in comatose. how? make a niche categories phone like perfect phone for reading with 16:10 aspect ratio (which is rare) the best aspect ratio actually for reading, gaming and videos, make it equip with digitizer just like galaxy note lineup, there are still so much aspect from a smartphone they can still win, racing with the camera just a wrong strategy. they can focus on the thing that got wrong and fix it like the aspect ratio, connecting more things with their phone like digital tv receiver dongle, arduino command module, thats not hard and expensive, why? because microsoft already have that machine in the form of PC/laptop they just need to replicate that ability into smaller body and portable, oh but no one see it because joe balfiore to busy playing candy crush saga with his shiny new iphone.  5. oh yeah apps store, no apps = no buyer, they are too lazy to updated their apps catalogs i cant even find YM for my lumia OMG. no official youtube app, line messenger cant buy any sticker in WP, OMG everything is so 2000 lol. why symbian dead? one of the reason no apps store and the available apps are sucks. and it happen again with WP. if me in mr.joe balfiore position i will pay google, yahoo, ETC to make app for my phone, i will populate the market with more free apps and give away 100% profits from paid apps for developer for 3 years if they making apps for WP as a free campaign and free advertisement, right? oh but mr. joe to busy browsing appstore on his new iphone
  • I like the idea that there's tons of new windows phones and sudden app updates in the store. So it goes to show that Lumia, and other Windows devices, are on the rise..
  • You rise..... Only to fall.
  • Why do we fall? So we can learn to pick ourselves up.
  • Oh god, keep dreaming.
  • I am not holding my breath for a surface phone.
  • People will likely disappointed.
  • I'll be breathing on an Android long before any Surface phone rises to the surface.
  • No here apps or mixradio. Why??!!!Windows phone since 2011. Struggling now. Might switch to android this year...
  • Mix radio has been discontinued on other OSes too .. Posted from Windows Central for Windows 10
  • I may be wrong but I think HERE, Spotify and other developer teams have abandoned .NET development because the iOS dev teams are under training to port the iOS apps to Windows 10 mobile using iOS Bridge (Islandwood project) so in fact I think later this year we will see great Spotify and HERE apps on the platform.
  • Cool!!! Make sure you keep us up to date on your move to Android... We ALL want to know where you are headed with your mobile phone choice...
  • Boy is he going to be surprised when he tries to get MixRadio to work on his shiny Android. I wish I could be there to see how he plans on getting a service that will no longer exist (for anyone ) to work.  Oh, right Android is magical so it definitely work in fantasy land. But, hey we can enjoy one last song: https://mixrad.io/mixes/104358833​
  • Can't shake the feeling that a lot of this is a wishful thinking... It just all takes too long, and Microsoft backs out of too many plans.
  • Still waiting for Windows 10
  • The wait is over! -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • For some but many are screwed.
  • Screwed how, by optimizing usability for modern phones? Time to put away the 3 year old device if you want 10, it's no different that iOS and Android, they just allow you to have a crappy experience, and then complain about that. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Must be nice to be like you with too much money and too few brains.
  • The problem is app ecosystem, unless Microsoft fixes this, OEMs won't join this platform.  Islandwood is very promising, I have high expectations that this project succeeds and consumers can finally have the same app they could have on an iPhone but now on a Surface phone.  All dev iOS teams that have spent billions of dollars in development and man hours in those polished iOS apps will finally be able to publish same app on Windows store in 5 minutes using virtual machine appliances that run on OS X or Windows that have iOS Bridge, Windows 10 Enterprise and Visual Studio tools to port the iOS app very fast.  My best wishes for Islandwood Microsoft team.
  • And queue emjey and Kamesh for some "we'll never make it... we are all going to die" comment... or "WP is dead", or some "yeah but Androd is better in bed" comment in 3...2...1...
  • A lot of convincing recently.
  • Windows Phone is going to be dead soon, and Here starts the new era of Windows 10 Mobile, aka Windows Mobile.
  • Windows is 95% dead... No windows 10 mobile release... People are switching to android and apple.. Stupid Microsoft are not capable of announcing one release.....
  • My exact thoughts.
  • @Venki m, hmm... Windows is 95% dead? O.o you aren't from a world where Lex Luthor is the hero not the villian by any chance? And Apple is the dominant force in the PC sector in terms of install base (which is clearly not the case on this particular planet - being Earth) :P.
  • @TechFreak1 he's talking about Windows MOBILE, and you know it. Stop trying to detract from the obvious by the derailing his comment into Windows desktop.
  • @Mindi B, eash can't take a joke? lol :P :). Normally I take screenshots of prior to ninja edits (I mention it in my comment if I have taken one) and his one is a prime candidate of a ninja edit :P.
  • I would say that Windows desktop will continue to see decline at the SMB level with Chromebooks and Macs. With Container apps over the next 5 years UWP won't matter.
  • This article is basically a consolation to those who were thinking Windows 10 Mobile would be released on 17th March. Folks, it's March '17.
  • Yes and it's not even 10 am in Redmond. I'm not going to believe the W10M release until I see it but there is still plenty of time today for that to happen.
  • Told you.
  • Actually it was written before today, and of course you know by now, no consolation necessary.,:-) Win10 Mobile is here! -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • The update is available for my Lumia 640xl. What can you say about that?
  • But it did release today :D
  • It's has never been the hardware or the ecosystem, it's just that nobody is willing to commit to a system that is always forcing them to redo everything, devs and OEM's get the feeling that MS is still experimenting. In the early stages of Android and IOS it was never like this. App developers and OEM's never had to go back to drawing board to from release to release.
    I hope that windows 10 will stabilize and universal apps take off, may be wishful thinking
  • iOS Bridge is the answer to your questions. Pretty sure giants like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn are very excited about Islandwood and the Windows 10 mobile future.
  • I am looking for some aggressive commercials with stars typically movie stars in india.. Because the response i see by the lagsung mobile company featuring the movie stars and common people in India do consider it very much. And if this clicks surely the% will rise from 3 to 5 at least i expect. I'm using Lumia from 2012 and will use until the last windows phone live. Apps are important but some big companies are still thinking and some are going away. Still I'll be with windows. There's a big lag of support and love from the app we have. And that is fairly disappointing. Still i hope for good days where most app will release first on uwp then in others. Using Lumia before it has a fm support! And will always. For me its best. Long live Windows 10.
  • Hey guys sorry out of topics , Windows 10 mobile public release is out already for selected device. Go check it out.
  • No its not yet. No official announcement from Microsoft yet
  • It's out already. Download Update Advisor and check it from there. Here's the link for Update Advisor : https://www.windowscentral.com/e?link=https2F%2Fclick.linksynergy.co...
  • Yeah there is, right here, WC linked it right here :P http://www.windowscentral.com/windows-10-mobile-over-air-update-older-lu...  
  • I can only say that I'm disappointed in the two 950XL phones I purchased.  One, mine, is a Windows Insider phone, the other one is not.  Both phones keep losing the Wi-Fi connection and I cannot get it back until I reboot the phones because when I open Settings and tap on Wi-Fi, it cannot find any connections.  Rebooting connects automatically.  It's aggravating, to say the least. Second problem is that I rely on Alarms for taking medication throughout the day.  When I add a Ringtone and test it, the volume is as it should be, but when I save the Alarm and the Alarm is activated at the appropriate hour, the volume is so low, I can barely hear it.  If I don't have the phone in my shirt pocket, I would never hear it.  And there is no way to adjust the volume.  The volume from other apps, Messaging, Messenger, What's App, etc are all OK. Other than those two problems, I love the phone.  I've reported them via Windows Feedback, but so far, nothing has been done. 
  • 1) sell your phone 2) switch to iOS or Android 3) problem solved
  • I switched to Android, and there is never gonna be a path back to Windows Phone, unless there is an Android based Windows Phone.  End of story.  MS will wise up around 2019. 
  • I switched from Android (to WP) and there is never a path back. If Windows Phone discontinues, i will go back to Feature Phone (or something new that is not there yet).
  • Microsoft needs to know that more phones does not equal more market share. By releasing more and more devices they're just neglecting their old devices like nokia.
  • With the continuous delays of the final version of W10M I have been thinking What is the benefit of having a Windows Phone Win 10 mobile device ? I have been waiting for too long and my patience nearly over. I am really fed up what is happening around W10 Mobile recently - we are losing one good app after another. Even worse there are almost no Win 10 mobile devices to choose from - only- ugly and expensive Lumia 950 and low end Lumia 550 and 650. I was really looking forward to buying Lumia 750/850 - both have been cancelled. lol I really seriously thinking of changing my Lumia 830 for iPhone 6 Plus - I will load it with all MS great looking apps. Apps from Micrsoft works better on iOS than on its own plaform, its sad.  
  • I do like my 950xl. It's snappy productive but it has some minor inconsistencies mostly related with third party apps so I hope they improve on this.
    They have made bold moves recently acquiring many companies related to their goal (Xamarin, withdrawing Google lawsuit). I hope this decision pays off if not all is lost hence windows phone is truly dead
  • I read a line in the article that said "The Lumias 550, 650, 950 and 950XL Windows 10 phones are touted by the company as "the most productive on the planet."​  That may be true, why then do I have to borrow an android from my boss to be able to use squareup?  I now carry two phones because of that reason.  There are other issues but it annoys me to all ends of the earth when I see how seemless my wife's iphone works and how she can facetime people so easily.    The WP OS is great don't get me wrong and one of the reasons I bought the WP was for the camera but the other phones now have great cameras too.  I will check out what the surface phone has but if Microsoft keeps giving their specialty apps to other OS's, there really is no real incentive for me to stay with them.  I know this sounds a lot like the other negative Nancy's on here but the people who aren't tech people or business people dont really care about Windows phone and see it as kind of a cute competitor, like Cricket Wireless.
  • I can skype or lync anybody. They don't even have to have an Apple device, it runs on every major platform.
  • "We've been assured that Microsoft is confident that as people are using and loving Windows 10, the consistency that the platform allows across devices, including phone will appeal to consumers.​" Half a year ago, I was thinking there may be this synergy but I think the Windows Phone sales over the past quarters have proven that unfortunately, this isn't the case. Most Windows 10 users may like it, but not enough to actually fully embrace the MS ecosystem, particularly phones. They may like Windows 10 on their PC (or even tablet) but like Android or iOS as much if not more. Even if they like Windows 10 more than what they use on their phone, that does not have to translate into wanting Windows 10 on their phone as well, even more so considering the differences between the two Windows 10 flavors.
  • @Gatanui Don't forget Windies 10 Mobile, which is more consistent with Windows 10 than Windows Phone 8.1 just released today and was only available on newer devices that are less than a year old.
    I share that to say that it takes time, definitely more than a few months in the case of devices released with 10 and minutes for those older devices just getting it, for this synergy across Windows 10 devices to begin to bear fruit. As more Windows 10 phones populate the space, from more OEMs and updates, and as the OS continues to evolve we may begin to see the effects of people moving to phone based on thier experience with Windows 10 on other devices. :-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • I salute you, to write all this. Jason Ward.
  • Thanks Kamesh:-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • A surface phone would definitely be something I would look at. However my carrier only seems to have low end Windows phones. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • All new hit series premiering soon: "Xbox isn't dead."
  • OEMs are already raising the bar from Mircosoft. The existenmce HP Elite x3 means the "surface phone" has to be better/different. I anticipated the "clam shell" dock from the very first time I set eyes on Continuum. We'll also see monitors with docks built in. Tablet sized touch screens where a phone can fit snugly in the back and create a new kind of 2-in-1. Would be good to look back at this in 18-24 months time...
  • Thanks for adding to the discussion. I excited to see what MS cooks up as well. HP certainly raised the bar. And I'm sure MS is glad about it. They need as many OEMs as possible to put devices and accessories out there that show what Windows 10 can do! -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • Let Microsoft do what Microsoft needs to do. Things take time. We just need to be patient and thankful to the Lord Jesus that we even woke up this morning. So lets be thankful we own devices that help us out day to day no matter the platform.
  • Nokia couldn't sell Windows Phones with their brand recognition and marketing, but smaller OEM's will be able to do it just because Microsoft retrenches from the market? That's not going to happen.
  • Actually Microsoft/Nokia sold devices primarily in the low end. That space appealed to ppl looking for inexpensive devices. Microsoft dominated that space, with over 90% representation. MSs pulling back creates a void where there was "relative" success. That space for OEMs may yield the most immediate results.
    Second, Windows 10 Mobile is being pushed as a component of the larger Windows ecosystem in a way that previous versions of the OS did not fit, or could further evolve in. This brings something more to table than those ore-windows 10 devices brought that did not sale well. It's an uphill battle and MS must push the entire ecosystem. But it must be acknowledged that as we look at the bigger picture, Windows 10 across devices us a different animal.:-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • The problem with your argument is that Microsoft has put all its services on iOS and Android. There is no advantage of owning Windows 10 mobile over anything else. You can use the Microsoft ecosystem without owning a Windows 10 mobile phone. So why would I choose Windows over Android or iOS?
  • Well hopefully Nadella "Better on Microsoft Devices" will come to fruition as Windows 10 which is less than a year old, and Windows 10 Mobile, which is in it's infancy, mature. It is conceivable that just as Cortana offers a richer experience on Windows devices, now as Windows 10 gets it feet under itself (so to speak) other first-party software will also have advantages on Microsoft devices. This is the vision Nadella expressed, and given the "incomplete" status of the platform over the past year, desktop just released July 29, 2015 and Windows 10 Mobile (with the exception of some devices beginning late last year) just released hours ago, it's reasonable to assume tighter integration of first-party software into the native OS was on hold until the OS reached a higher level of completion. For instance, our own WC app was delayed to some extent due to Windows 10 immaturity.
    So lets see what happens next. Of course as a fan, I hope for unique advantages of first-party software as well.:-) Thanks for the input. -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • Is Windows phones not doing well because of the hardware or the OS????? I am asking this because some are talking as if the expected surface phone would do better than the current phones yet people forget that Windows OS for desktop/tablets have almost all features that you don't find on Windows Mobile OS.
  • Neither. It's dead (yes, DEAD people, face reality) because the ecosystem has not only failed to grow, but steadily declined. Developers are not interested, which leads to the market not being interested.
  • Hey, I've never thought that Windows Phone is dead. According to w3counter, WP - about 7% of mobile market. In comparision, OS X - about 7% of PC market. Have you ever heard, from an Apple user, that OS X is dead? NO, it's just 'special' and 'not for everybody' ;) OS X suffer from lack of apps, as well as WP. But WP is 'special'! I like the interface of Windows, i like design and camera quality of my Lumia 930 (definitely better than iPhone 6 camera, really), and i am special! From today, we all must talk that low popularity of WP is an advantage! We are just more special! Greetings, and, of course, sorry for my English!
  • No windows phone isn't dead but any app that comes to windows phone will be dead over a little time
  • I really hope that these OEMs will sell their device in more countries. Most of them have better specs and much cheaper. Thanks Jason btw.. Really enjoyed reading your article. :)
  • Thanks Matt! As OEMs take the lead we should see Windows phones availability increase in more regions.:-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • I dont care what phone MS builds or how many OEMs are building WM10 phones.  Having the APPS people want is the only way WM10 on phones will "succeed" For me success is only in the comsumer market where MS is currently getting stomped.  Currently the phone store is a wasteland of missing or nonupdated apps.  UWP and the purchase of Xamarin along with bridging tools is suppose to change this but to me it will take years for this to happen. Consumer like me want apps and want them now.  "OEMs will build devices that meet the needs of consumer" NOPE! developers will build the apps that meet the needs of consumers.  If the apps arent there then consumers wont be there.  I continue to believe they way forwar is Cyanogen OS and porting all WM10 features and apps into a version of Cyanogen OS with both stores.  So MS, if your focus is business then say it and stop talking about selling to consumers other fans.  I'm waitng on the surface phone but if its running WM10 I'm out.
  • Exactly what I just posted but not sure if it posted. Lol
  • Well besides the part about w10m.. I'd rather have windows mobile than any other os. No point in making a new is when this ones awesome.
  • A 6" to 6.5" phablet, with top of the line specs and with a stylus, capable of running x86 apps, and be available on ALL CARRIERS (including Verizon Wireless), would be the last phone I would need.
  • Me too. Everything bigger than 4,7" i consider unsable as a *mobile* device.
  • Here's how I've always seen it...
    We have a great os and great hardware. My opinion is that it's just as good if jot better in some ways than android and iPhone. Problem is app gap. Simple as that. Trust me, if people got their hands on a windows phone packed with all the apps iOS has. They wouldn't go back. Even without the apps I still have a hard time letting go of my beat up icon. It's fast as my iOS device, it's os is better in my opinion and so much more. I know MSFT won't give up and already I'm seeing many companies dedicate themselves to making apps. I can guarantee windows phone success if and only if this app gap gets smaller. Yes we have tons of apps. But they're not the ones people want. Not to mention the lack of support our apps currently get. Just finally we are seeing more support etc but if it keeps rising we will have more windows phone users.
  •   Whatever positive thing may happen with W10M  
    it will have an effect starting to show up in 2017 earliest. It will take time, a lot of time.   .   
  • It's not just dead. It's already decomposing. What remains of it is just the twitches you get when you put electricity on a dead frog. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • good article, I'm all for the furthering of the Eco-system which MS will need to continue to push the envelope and potentially pave the way instead of following the status quo, growing pains and all.
  • Officially MS has killed Windows10 mobile themselves by not supporting x20 series of devices, that makes about say over 35% of the entire WP market share. Well, not gonna buy another windows device, switching over to android bug free experience. 
  • Lolll So true.. Switching to ios
  • Spotify ended support for Windows Phone, Here apps won't be available on w10m... And the guy is saying "Windows Phone isn't dead" if ut isn't dead it is in coma
  • Spotify did not end supporr.  Try to keep up.
  • Hi Max, trust me as an industry watcher and tech writer I know MS has its challenges in mobile but with millions of enthusiasts who support the platform, an OS upgrade that as we speak is being distributed to 10s of Millions of phones, OEMs such as VAIO, Alcatel, HP, Trinity, and Acer investing millions in building new Windows phone devices, Microsoft themselves investing millions of dollars and many man hours refining the mobile OS and releasing 4 new Windows phones 550, 650, 950 and 950 XL in less than a year, and working on a category-defining device as we speak yep, "this guy":-) IS saying Windows phone isn't dead! Check out the rest of the series here: https://doc.co/TkR8nw for a broader perspective, and by the way, Spotify's still here!:
    http://m.windowscentral.com/spotify-isnt-going-anywhere-and-will-continu... :-) -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • Geez! Don't over exaggerate this. People are really incompetent at Microsoft that even after promise they abandoned windows phone yesterday. 
  • Long read Jason, nothing to really disagree with. 'A PC in every home and on every desk.' Let's rewrite that to 'A PC in every hand palm'. The true 'Palm' PC is about. ;-) That said, why not accept all this 'Windows Phone is dead'? You, I and plenty more understand that with UWP and cloud services it has become pretty useless to discuss devices with a lot of hype. And if we do, we better not talk about a phone, but about the PC in our hands with which we can also place a traditional non-ip phone call. That doesn't make me fond of the term Surface Phone, I would rather coin Palm Surface or something of the sort. May I challenge you as a tech writer to come out of the mind framing terminology and lead your readers into the future even more. On Windows. The transition from Windows 7 to Windows 8.x has been a discontinuous one. Creative destruction not accepted by the majority of consumers and business alike. With the Universal Windows (10) Platform, including one developer platform and one store, we see Microsoft recovering from this mishap, creating a rather seamless transition from Windows 7 to Windows 10. Windows 8.x users will have to accept. There is discontinuity still, Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile, but this discontinuity will surely fade rapidly down the road, it will just be Windows. As for a new 2-in-1 device category, it already exists. Remember ASUS PadFone http://www.asus.com/Phone/Fonepad-Products/​   I fancy this as a Windows 10 combo. :-)  
  • Doesn't matter what hardware or partnerships you get, if you don't have apps you won't gain market share. Period. I'm ready to be done with windows phone because nobody will make apps. Major Apps are getting pulled and discontinued left and right. Outlook is bleak for WP.
  • Love your articles, Jason. Thanks for helping us keep things in perspective. There is a strong role enthusiasts and evangelists can play in this as well. Sometimes fans can be the platform's worst enemy. The constant clamor for the "perfect" device that doesn't exist on any platform is disheartening. Brace yourself for the inevitable rending of garments and the picking apart of the vaunted Surface Phone when it is introduced. I have a 950 and it is every bit the flagship promised.
  • Thanks Mark. And your observations are true. We can of course acknowledge imperfections, which is fine, without becoming unintentionally harmful to the platform as you point out is sometimes the case. -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • Episode VII: The Phone Awakens.
  • Windows phone is already dead... Nobody is prefering it.. Dont u See.. Not even a single flagship Since 1020..
  • Actually @sheefymaster the Lumia 1520 was a flagship after the 1020, as was the Icon/930. Some also debate that the M8 was a flagship. But without a doubt the 950 and 950XL are positioned as flagships and have great specs: http://m.windowscentral.com/new-lumias-are-microsofts-colorful-imacs -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • This is the first article of the series that I've read so forgive me if the issue of App Gap has already been addressed. However all of the Surface Phones and new partners won't drive mass market share without app parity. Businesses today have adopted BYOD for mobile. Mine gives me a stipend and lots of folks get either partial or full reimbursement. Thus you have to convince the consumer to choose Microsoft and even for business app plays a role. I got a Lumia 950 primarily because of Continuum but I find myself getting squeezed out of my companies mobile strategy. Expense reports, timesheets, travel apps are not available. Until app development becomes a "big 3" instead of just a 2 man game, I fear that MS will be stuck behind the times.
  • Surfacephone is coming and I t will dominated .powered by Intel chip.windows mobile is so much alive.keep in mind that windows mobile is just in starting to conquere
  • "As such we must change our perspective from the Lumia dominant view that Microsoft's first-party hardware equals Windows phone". I dont think we have any such perspective. We always talk about windows phone market share and not lumia market share
  • @wibgyor Thanks for your input. There have been some complaints from the community that suggest a perspective that if Microsoft doesn't produce a phone then the ecosystem is failing. We also must remember that because Lumia has had over 90% of Windows phone markets share, for many fans the language "windows phone" market share and "Lumia" market share are synonymous. This is only exacerbated by the fact that many fans have been vocal about thier criticisms of non-Lumia Windows phones. I'm reminded of some of the responses to the HTC M8 and the negative comments on one of Daniels pieces (before I joined WC as a writer) that gave a very positive view of that device. Some of the comments "attacked" the piece and the praise of the device as if it, as a Windows phone from another manufacturer didn't add value to the Windows phone ecosystem because it wasn't a Lumia.
    Also when we here comments like, there are no new phones, "what is MS doing", or "if MS doesn't do something soon "I'm leaving", or "MS needs to make more phones like Samsung" or "other rivals like Apple make phones every year", when the HP Elite X3, Jade Primo, Vaios new device and, have just been announced and Alcatel has confirmed thier own high end device ALL using Microsoft's Mobile OS, are ignored as if these devices don't represent Microsoft's Mobile platform. In general we need to take the view we have with PCs. If we saw Dell, HP and others announcing 2-in-1s, laptops and PCs all touting Windows 10 we wouldn't feel MS isn't "doing something" if there was no new Surface readily available. We recognize all of those devices represent Windows. -------------------------------
    Jason L Ward @JLTechWord
  • I partially agree. But the reason that "windows phone" market share and "Lumia" market share have become synonymous is because very few partners launched exciting windows phones and HTC M8 was one the few devices which wasnt enough. The lack of any exciting windows phone be it from microsoft or from its partners puts the blame squarely on microsoft's door. That is why people lament microsoft for not doing enough.
  • Please dear god and jesus as well, stop these... I can't take it anymore.. waterboard me instead pleeeeaaase!!! :D :P Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Well Jason I finally got to read your article on a Saturday morning but it took breakfast and 2 cups of coffee. You have created a mind shift for me seeing that Microsoft's end game is Windows 10 looked at as a whole, leading hardware design and buy in from OEM's. The app gap is fading with mobile friendly web pages I do not miss my banking app. My 9 year old daughter uses a $200 USD Walmart type Atom Win 10 2 in 1 where a couple of years ago the school only allowed iPads. The proliferation of 2 in 1 devices and the recent examples of devices from HP Elite X3, Jade Primo, Vaios is blowing my mind. The ecosystem will become very hard to ignore for OEM's and service providers over the next couple of years.
  • While it's good to see HP, Alcatel, Trinity, vaio (and you forgot Coship Molly X1) these phones probably won't be available in a lot of markets, limiting our options as consumers in these markets to Lumia devices only. 
  • 2010 - 2016 and we have Cortana, Windows Hello, Continuum and other tonnes of features. We entered I to the mobile phone market naively and we've gotten this far and still getting better. Who says we won't get any further better? Windows Phone isn't dead. Just that people want it NOW not in development. And the software's of today are hardware killers. But nevertheless, I believe MSFT is going to get better cause right now they're doing a great job. When I first watched the MSFT event where the Surface Book was introduced, I almost cried. Now that's great idea-turn-reality and for what it's worth the price is worth it. If we get a surface phone, it'd be good. But we are not eliminating Lumia. It's going to be better cause we now have to battle others with surface phone's and Lumia's. And with the best of the best brought in by surfaces', their variant should build on it. Maybe that's why MSFT isn't rushing it. Because I think if the surface phone ever debuts. Then we get to see a game changer. A different hardware and effective and efficient software. And to be expectant on MSFT is gross. Just because of everything they've given us over the past year. OEM's will help a lot. But MSFT has got to give them some legacy to build on.
  • If they need apps by developers, then they should give the developers presents. for example: a lumia 950 as lifetime testing-device for apps in the app-store. it is all about money, isn't it?
  • I just got to the articles now. Very good work. However, I am not fully convinced of the future of WPas described. Since my first comments on WP with my first try of a Lumia 630, I've got the feeling that while WIndows is, from far, greater and better than Android, it only bring "another" phone to the market. Some people remember the BADA OS from Samsung. While being the biggest phone seller, Bada didn't survive. I think it is the same with Windowd Phone regadless of what MS is ready to invest to keep it alive. MS has missed the windows last winter, introducing the 950 and forgetting all the Lumia devices "Just before the hollidays". Who is going to "try" the new W10 OS priced over $600 when he already has a working Lumia? Very few persons. Six month later, most Lumia got W10 and continue to live with it ..... or moved to Android / iPhone because of some apps. Now, MS is talking about Surface Phone as a reference to Surface book, but the two are totally different. Having no market share on WP, there is no value to introduce another hardware with a new name. What can you do with the WP you can't with Android? I am convinced that having other phone HW vendors offering Windows will not change the market. Only being able to show that you have a better value with Windows may change the customer behaviour. And also more country/region focused apps support.
  • Windows phones lost all of their apps, developers, and market share when they left Windows Mobile, which was like a mini-XP open environment.  Windows Phone/Zune, was an attempt to monopolize the sales of apps and media like Apple.  Users, developers, and phone manufacturers screamed before, during, and after the transition.  Their developers for the most part went for Android, and since .NET was a clone of Java, the transition was not as difficult as anticipated, and it cemented Java as the development platform of choice, while .NET faded into irrelevance, ?nix knowledge and tools exploded due to both Android and Apple being based on it.  For WP, It was lack of appeal due to an incapable OS, no apps, and a closed environment in the face of Apple and Android, that brought it to where it is today.  Only the once-number-one Nokia was foolish enough to bet on WP, and it cost them their company.  MS bought them to stay in the game.  Microsoft's disastrous loss of the mobile market proves the tail does not wag the dog.  The only mobile success MS has had in the mobile market was AFTER they produced tablets that could actually run Windows.  The appointment of conscienceless new leadership brought the intentional deception of renaming of WP/RT/Zune to Windows 10 to create an illusionn and buy time and mindshare while they attempt to ball themselves out of the WP/RT debacle.  They perform sneak-attack-upgrades to abscond with your personal files and information which they sell.  The Windows ecosystem is a myth perpetrated by desperate scabbing the WP/RT/Zune OS onto Windows 8+ to run the lame Metro apps.  If they actually had Windows running on phones, Windows would be running away with the phone market because it is by far the most capable OS.  The image of Microsoft in people’s minds today is me-too vision, out of touch, untrustworthy, bullying, and desperate.  Technology is a short term investment.  Reading fairy tales about future is a waste of time.  The only thing that matters is what works best for what WE want right now.  The current market share reflects who has been good at providing that, and that the tail does not wag the dog.
  • Windows phones lost all of their apps, developers, and market share when they left Windows Mobile, which was like a mini-XP open environment.  Windows Phone/Zune, was an attempt to monopolize the sales of apps and media like Apple.  Users, developers, and phone manufacturers screamed before, during, and after the transition.  Their developers for the most part went for Android, and since .NET was a clone of Java, the transition was not as difficult as anticipated, and it cemented Java as the development platform of choice, while .NET faded into irrelevance.  ?nix knowledge and tools exploded due to both Android and Apple being based on it.  For WP, It was lack of appeal due to an incapable OS, no apps, and a closed environment in the face of Apple and Android that brought it to where it is today.  Only the once-number-one Nokia was foolish enough to bet on the platform, and it cost them their company.  MS bought them to stay in the game.  Microsoft's disastrous loss of the mobile market proves the tail does not wag the dog.  The only mobile success MS had in the mobile market was AFTER they produced tablets that could actually run Windows.  The appointment of conscienceless new leadership brought the intentional deception of renaming of WP/RT/Zune to Windows 10 to create an illusion and buy time and mindshare while they attempt to ball themselves out of the WP/RT debacle.  They performed sneak-attack-upgrades to abscond with your personal files and information which they sell for revenue.  The Windows ecosystem is a myth perpetrated by the desperate scabbing the WP/RT/Zune OS onto Windows 8+ to run the lame Metro apps.  If they actually had Windows running on phones, Windows would be running away with the phone market.  The image of Microsoft in people’s minds today is me-too vision, out of touch, untrustworthy, bullying, and desperate.  Technology is a short term investment.  Reading fairy tales about the future is a waste of time.  The only thing that matters is what works best for what WE want right now.  The current market share reflects who is good at providing that, and that the tail does not wag the dog.
  • Windows phones lost all of their apps, developers, and market share when they left Windows Mobile, which was like a mini-XP open environment.  Windows Phone/Zune, was an attempt to monopolize the sales of apps and media like Apple.  Users, developers, and phone manufacturers screamed before, during, and after the transition.  Their developers for the most part went for Android, and since .NET was a clone of Java, the transition was not as difficult as anticipated, and it cemented Java as the development platform of choice, while .NET faded into irrelevance.  ?nix knowledge and tools exploded due to both Android and Apple being based on it.  For WP, It was lack of appeal due to an incapable OS, no apps, and a closed environment that brought it to where it is today.  Only the once-number-one Nokia was foolish enough to bet on the platform, and it cost them their company.  MS bought them to stay in the game.  Microsoft's disastrous loss of the mobile market proves the tail does not wag the dog.  The only mobile success MS had in the mobile market was AFTER they produced tablets that could actually run Windows.  The appointment of conscienceless new leadership brought the intentional deception of renaming of WP/RT/Zune to Windows 10 to create an illusion and buy time and mindshare while they attempt to ball themselves out of the WP/RT debacle.  They performed sneak-attack-upgrades to abscond with your personal files and information which they sell for revenue.  The Windows ecosystem is a myth perpetrated by the desperate scabbing the WP/RT/Zune OS onto Windows 8+ to run the lame Metro apps.  If they actually had Windows running on phones, Windows would be running away with the phone market.  The image of Microsoft in people’s minds today is me-too vision, out of touch, untrustworthy, bullying, and desperate.  Technology is a short term investment.  Reading fairy tales about the future is a waste of time.  The only thing that matters is what works best for what WE want right now.  The current market share reflects who is good at providing that, and that the tail does not wag the dog.
  • What I am most upset about is that the Windows Mobile platform is really the only one I can use.  Having multiple sclerosis, the tiles and interface makes all the difference.  iOS and Android cannot offer this.  I even switch to AT&T to obtain the Lumia 950.  Microsoft please do not abandon Windows mobile.