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Android users mix in some Metro to beautify their UI

"Come to us my children!" - Steve Ballmer, I/O 2011. All jokes aside, it's become quite clear that a number of Android users actually want something more than a grid packed full of icons, widgets and whatnot. something cleaner, sleeker and more unique (as does Google). Windows Phone features Metro UI that ticks all the boxes mentioned above and has been somewhat ported to Android in many forms (including a media player, oh and Bing (opens in new tab)).

We've now learnt of a full-featured Android ROM that's been modified up by Lifehacker reader MortemTuam and sports a Windows Phone like home screen with a Metro UI influence. What differentiates this from previous Android attempts we've covered is that this actually looks pretty damn good. Here's how he put it all together (and what was used for you folk who have Android handsets):

Seems like a lot of time and work, right? I'll always ask the question of "if you like it so much, why not experience the real thing?". Tinkering with the OS is fine but you'll never have the smoothness of WP7, something that goes hand-in-hand with the Metro UI. Sorry Android, you might be able to look like our OS, but you'll never behave like it.

Source: LifeHacker.au (opens in new tab)

Rich Edmonds
Senior Editor, PC Build

Rich Edmonds is Senior Editor of PC hardware at Windows Central, covering everything related to PC components and NAS. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.

34 Comments
  • Its like ripping off other peoples work is baked into the android DNA, os and users alike.
  • I carry one android phone, I agree that I get tired of widgets and icons sometime and put wp7 skin on it, it is fresh looking, I use it for few days, and that tiles gets boring in a day or two for sure, there is no background image no customization at all. And, again after few months I might want my phone to look like an iOS, I put some very cool looking ROMS like MIUI on it.. use it for few days, then again come back to android UI. After few months I am bored with android and want to do something exciting, I put Ubuntu on it. Man, Android is awesome!! I feel freedom there. Can your beta OS do all this?
  • Sounds tedious and sounds like you have ADD. I like being able to use my device. I'll pass.
  • I sooo like the last sentence of the last paragraph. They can copy as much as they want, but they will never have the unique features of WP.
  • Is this type of launcher illegal now, when M$ have a patent for it?
  • That story was updated: patent application was approved for review, not approved for patent.
  • As a .NET, C# Developer and Android user I can tell you that yes, some people do actually like the "Metro" UI and have replicated it on Android. Why would they do this and not just buy a Windows Phone so that they can experience the "real thing"? Because they don't want to be locked down. Apple's iOS locks you down to Apple in some respects yet even still, it is more "open" in terms of Apps and what can be done on it than Windows Phone.Android is much more open in the sense that users can mold the UI how they want, they can completely replace built-in applications and are much more free to bend their Android device to their will.To be fair, Apple's iOS can be jailbroken and made to be more "open" and while there is some hacking that can be done with Windows Phone (check XDA), it still doesn't get to the level of Android or even iOS for that matter.Some may say "Android has malware" which is supposed to be a big negative but remember, Windows has malware, viruses and rootkits and the same people that are victims for those on Windows are the same people that are victims on Android.Some people actually like the "Metro" UI but they don't want to be locked down on Windows Phone. For example, if you are a heavy Google Apps user then Windows Phone will be a big paperweight for you. There are some third party apps to help in some regards there but quality is an issue.Windows Phone is a Microsoft Phone designed to mainly use Microsoft Services. For Music, Windows Phone gives us Zune which never got more than a 2% Market Share and Xbox Live for Gaming. Both of which require hefty fees for use. I still to this day do not understand why Zune costs more than even the best of Streaming alternatives and yet it has never gone over 2% so the price is absurd.Fans of Windows Phone like to think that Microsoft Office is a killer feature. iOS, Android and Blackberry all have had great Office integration for years and NO, having the real thing is NOT important as most people don't spend much time in Word Documents and Excel Spreadsheets on their Phone.Why bring a little Windows Phone "Metro" UI to Android? Because you can. The target audience for Android is vastly different from Windows Phone. We Android users want choice. Windows Phone offers none. So, we can easily replicate what we like.For me though, I tried going all Windows Phone "Metro" on my Samsung Galaxy S (Captivate) for a while. I couldn't stand it. The huge tiles felt like a toy to me. People that saw my phone asked "is that a Fisher Price Phone". I found that I didn't use the apps I typically used because on iOS and Android I could easily group Apps on the home screen where as on Windows Phone you can't group "pinned" Apps at all. So, I had to go swipe away at the App List to find what I wanted and with a lot of apps, that was too much work. "Mango" brings better features for searching for Apps but it's not the same as grouping apps on the home screen.I live on my phone and it is my main media player so I expect the Music App to be really good. While the Windows Phone Music App (UberMusic on Android) is nice the one thing that really boiled my blood was that it was missing the ability to manage playlists. No editing, no creating on phone. This is absolutely absurd. iOS and Android have done this for a long time now, why not Windows Phone? While I'm sure UberMusic on Android will be updated to add these features as they are expected by most users alas, the real thing still won't have these features.In the end, I couldn't take it anymore and gave up.Others enjoy some of the "Metro" UI and splash it about as they desire and that is the nice thing about Android, you can change it however you want.Is this an Android vs Windows Phone thing? No, it is simply a matter of choice. Neither choice is wrong so long as it is the correct choice for the individual.
  • Well, a fandroid that´s not lurking. Your biased commentary is worthless, to say the least.
  • You should read his tweets, WP7 hate through and through!
  • Worthless? Maybe to you and more specifically, the readers of this blog, but considering that Windows Phone has a Market Share of 1% and falling and Android is at 48% and rising, I'd say there is some merit in there.Biased? I wouldn't say that at all. I started with Windows Mobile, moved to iOS and then to Android. As soon as iPhone 5 comes out I'm switching to that. Why? I like gadgets and more importantly, I like those that I feel have a strong future. While I had hoped Windows Phone would be great, in my eyes, sadly it is not.My opinion yes but I believe Market Share, comScore and Nielsen Reports tend to back up my opinion.As for @theefman, yes, at times I am venomous towards WP7 on Twitter. Why? I try to open eyes... I try to point out the realities of things hoping more people will take off their rose colored glasses and take a good look at reality.However, you are right, I do have a tendency to use more vinegar than honey in my efforts.I will say that some of my efforts have actually worked. I noticed one of my WP7 friends is actually looking to port his Windows Phone Game to iOS and Android. He gets it. He sees that there is more out there than Windows Phone. It doesn't mean he doesn't like Windows Phone, he just sees that there is more money to be had elsewhere.That is some of what I have been trying to get across and I'm glad at least one person has understood what I've been saying.
  • jaja idiot.
  • Tonto yo? jaja :)No, sorry man, I know I can be a bit much on Twitter but I do in fact mean well.Honestly though, I've been working in the Microsoft world long enough to know that anything I say that conflicts with whatever Microsoft says will be seen in a negative light.That's fine. I'm used to that. You can't blame me for trying.I find a lot of things that I like about Microsoft and specifically, .NET but there is nothing that could make me believe that "Mango" will have much affect on Windows Phone.Is this a Betamax vs VHS thing? Possibly but consumers and businesses have spoken rather loudly and Windows Phone is actually going down in popularity, not up.Can "Mango" change that? No, not by itself. Not using the same marketing strategies Microsoft employed this past year.Nokia promises to pull out all the stops and market the heck out of it. While Nokia never sold well in the U.S. they plan on flooding the market with cheap phones and market the heck out of them to lure more people in.Can they do it? I suspect they might have some success but I don't see Windows Phone hitting double digits in 2012.Am I an idiot? Maybe but the platforms I support are what people want.As a .NET Developer you too could be targeting those platforms using MonoTouch and Mono for Android.Using your Mobile Development skills to hit more than one market to help your own app sales is not something to be ashamed of. Not doing it out of spite is.
  • You keep throwing around "As a .NET Developer..." Is that supposed to mean something? Are you an authority on all things mobile because you're a ".NET Developer"? I hate to break it to you, but you're just a fandroid who's trying to sound intelligent by writing comments longer than the original story.
  • I'm not trying to prove myself as any sort of "authority" at all. I point out that I am a .NET Developer so everyone knows that I am a fan of .NET and the C# Programming Language. I've been programming in it since the beta days long ago.Writing long comments is just something I do, I'm a wordy person :-)I write long comments to try to get my point across. This is a really tough crowd here and I know 99% of everyone here will just vote me down for whatever I say so I write a lot and clearly so that 1% that actually reads before flaming might actually hear what I have to say.Sorry, I'm not trying to **** in someone's cereal here, I'm just being honest and giving everyone a different perspective... one I'm sure isn't and will likely never be well received here... sadly.
  • Since you are trying to open eyes, would you mind if I opened yours? I have a 45 yr old aunt and she recently renewed her plan. The salesman pushed to her a Dell Streak. Yep, that half phone half tablet thing. She doesn't know how to use it for other than to make calls and send messages. And that was all she used it for.She gave the phone to me and I played around with it. I signed in my GMail, went to the Appstore, downloaded some UI changer and changed how stuff looked. Yes I agree Android is good in this area, but do you realize that this applies to people like you and me? My aunt? She just changed her wallpaper. That's it.I tried to use the Dell Streak for a week. Downloaded some apps and games. And some games didn't scale to the screen size, pretty disappointing. I tried some apps and was scratching my head sometimes as to why the app sometimes would run as a background task even after repeatedly closing it in the task manager.And then I saw this AVG AV program in the DroidStore, I installed it and Bam! The launcher kept crashing. That's right. It crashed. And I couldn't use it until I restore to factory settings.I couldn't figure out for the life of me how to add tabs/pages until I realised I had to swipe the screen in a 45 degree angle upwards from left to right.My aunt then got a white Iphone 4 and best thing is she doesnt have an Apple account and no email address. I had to help her create one. All she wanted was to listen to the radio man...I wanted her to try a Windows Phone 7 but alas, there's no more stocks in my country.Sure there's like 48% Android Marketshare. But how many of those people are like my aunt who just uses the phone for calls, messages and radio?I left the Streak where in my laptop bag. It has been there for 2 weeks now, battery must have died and I don't have the heart to take it out again.I simply cannot bear to look at the UI anymore with its Application icons. It looked almost similar as my PC Desktop.I'm really happy with my Omnia 7. The user experience is simply smoother and far easier to use than the Dell Streak. I simply cannot be bothered to change the UI. The Metro UI looks amazing especially the transitions. Sure its all Flat and 2D like but heck, the flipping tells that give you more info underneath, I'd never thought of that. Whoever thought of that, kudos.Oh btw, I have 2 colleagues who used the WP7 icons for the Iphone. Wow, the guy who wrote that app did a good job because he just helped sell 2 WP7 phones. Those 2 colleagues of mine are planning to get the new Mango phones that are coming out. :)
  • Don't apologize for not proofreading, it came from the heart and that definitely came across in your message. :-)You have many valid points there. Anyone that just wants to make phone calls and nothing else definitely shouldn't buy an Android Phone. I'd dare say that the iPhone is too much for that type of individual as well.My father is a BlackBerry user. He's in his 60's and mainly uses his phone for Email and Phone Calls. After seeing all his kids running around with iPhones and Android Phones, he decided he should try one out.He was due for an upgrade in a month and planned to get an iPhone so I offered to let him use a spare Android Phone I had in the mean time just so he could see what using a modern smartphone was like. We got him all setup with Email and access to the Market and installed some Apps he wanted so then he was good to go.Within a week he brought me the phone back and said "I don't think I'm ready for anything like this, I just want something simple... Email and Calls".I'm glad I had an extra phone for him to try. Would iPhone have been better? In his case, I don't think so.As far as the Dell Streak goes... man that is a big "phone". What in the world made the salesman think that your Aunt would need with a phone like that, especially if all she wanted was something to make Phone Calls with. I think the answer there is the word "salesman" :-)As for the iPhone, while you might like the "Metro" UI on Windows Phone better, it is obvious that the majority of "average" consumers think otherwise as parts of iOS keep trickling into Mac OS X.I think the UI metaphors shared by iOS and Android work well as they are familiar and thus comfortable for most users.I tried an actual Windows Phone and I tried replicating it on my Android and I found the User Interface very unfriendly. Microsoft is really pushing the use of Panoramas in Apps. While they look pretty, the User Experience suffers because of the use. Captions, Titles and other contextual elements are clunky in this view as it is hard to read. The user has to scroll to read simple things like Captions and Titles. That just isn't very friendly to users. It looks pretty if a beautiful background picture is added but it just isn't user friendly.On the other hand, the Pivot control works nice and has been used for years on Android and iOS Apps so it is familiar and useful.But we're talking Apples, Gingerbread and Mangos here :-)It comes down to user appeal.You found Android, or at least Dell's presentation of Android unusable. I myself found Touchwiz on Samsung's handsets to be unusable for me and quickly changed that out. I'm now a big fan of ADW. Should I have to change out my home/launcher to get a phone that is pleasing to use? No, but I'm glad I can.I personally do not like the Windows Phone "Metro" UI. It just doesn't work for me. I know that Microsoft likes to tell all their fans that the UI on iOS and Android is old and tired... fanboys repeat that almost verbatim so I know it is drilled into them. However, I'd have to disagree and say that consumers, businesses and the industry in general believes otherwise.I'm glad you are happy with Windows Phone, really, I am.I love playing with Android but I love iOS as well.Different strokes for different folks ;)
  • By the way, I wouldn't use AVG on Android. It is a little bloated and slow. I like to use "Lookout Mobile Security". It is to Android what Microsoft Security Essentials is to Windows. It is very light, not resource intensive at all.
  • I hadn't proofread what I wrote as it came from the heart. :)
  • Have you got proof that the marketshare of WP7 is falling? Or are you confusing this with Windows Mobile phasing out with WP7 growing steadily? Let's not forget tht the smartphone market is growing at a staggering rate, so WP7 could be growing quickly, but no where near as quick as fragmented as Android. The percentages would then reflect not showing exact values and providing a false reading to the average reader.For example, not so long ago Windows OS was at 10%, then it fell to 9%, but it doesn't differentiate Win Mo to WP7 so how can one tell if it's losing marketshare or not. Then lets not forget manufacturers over at Android are now considering Microsoft's platform as a second choice to Android.you say ComScore, Nielsen back you up? Check this site, we report on these analysis quite frequently, I don't remember once have we reported WP7 as falling. I could be wrong, but I'm not a .NET developer. I have no idea what you say on Twitter but for you to **** about WP7 when both Apple and Google are copying from it is pretty much moot.
  • Unfortunately, there aren't much of any stats out there that split up Windows Mobile and Windows Phone.While Microsoft hasn't been as forthcoming about official sales stats, independent research firms such as Gartner have revealed such numbers and they haven't been good.The latest estimate shows that Microsoft's Windows Phone (all devices combined) has made sales of around 1.7 million.In contrast to that, Samsung's lesser known Bada sold 2 million in the same time span.You can check out the latest mobile stats here:GartnercomScoreNielsenCanalysDo these reports really matter? The mobile tech world goes into a frenzy whenever updates are reported so I would assume there is a big market for such data.Based on these Reports, Android, iOS and Symbian remain on top with Windows Phone drowning at the bottom of the pool.Things change and in this market there is always room for change but just how much is the question.All of the reporting agencies listed above lump Windows Phone and Windows Mobile into the same lot. Personally I don't think that is fair but I believe it is done this way because otherwise, the stats might be way to low to even include."Mango" does a lot for the Windows Phone platform, however, a lot will have to change in terms of how it is marketed and how consumers feel about the platform before any big changes will be seen.The popular belief among fans is that when Nokia stops shipping Symbian that Windows Phone will take over that user base. While that is a rather absurd belief, there are some ways that it could come true.First, Nokia is in the middle of upgrading certain Symbian phones to the latest "Belle" release which oddly enough looks identical to Android. So with that we can see that Symbian is still alive and well.Second, Nokia has a deal with Microsoft which allows them to deviate from current Windows Phone requirement specifications in order to compete in the low cost arena.While this will introduce fragmentation into the Windows Phone ecosystem, it will also pave the way for "upgrading" more Symbian users to Windows Phone.Will Nokia ever really do that? Who knows but theoretically they could. However, one has to question if it will be viable to do so (in terms of cost).Microsoft, Nokia and all the Windows Phone partners still have a very steep hill to climb but who knows, they might could do it.Microsoft, Apple and Oracle could destroy Android in the courtroom. While this would be a big shame, I wouldn't put it past that trio to do that. However, doing so might backfire as it might bring about much more resentment that would lead consumers away.Who knows but it should make for some very interesting times ahead.
  • TLDNR
  • Great Post Kdardy! I actually found this post to be pretty fair and I'm a HUGE WP7 user. Saying that, I need clarification on a few of your points:"Some may say "Android has malware" which is supposed to be a big negative but remember, Windows has malware, viruses and rootkits and the same people that are victims for those on Windows are the same people that are victims on Android."Now when you say "Windows" do you mean Windows Phone or Windows Desktop OS?If you are comparing Android OS to Windows desktop, then you are right and which is why some people (like me) who are not interested in having this battle on our phones appreciates a company that takes a proactive approach to preventing Malware instead of dealing with it after the fact. Then again, Android Market is "open" so can't be open and regulated at the same time huh? The question I have for you is why would you be "open" to having to deal with this malware problem on your phone in the first place. Someone needs to get off their **** and fix this! Oh wait.. Some user will figure it out. "The target audience for Android is vastly different from Windows Phone. We Android users want choice. Windows Phone offers none. So, we can easily replicate what we like."Sounds great but the average Android owner has such a device mainly because they are cheap and the most available and pushed OS on all carriers. I will not get into why the OEM's push Android because that'a another debate. When the average user is not a tweaker or tech minded person, usually they're only interested in getting the information they want (text messages, IM's, emails and phone calls) Roms, Hacks, launchers and user maintenance is not what the average user looks for when they go to pick up a phone. Saying that, the appeal of a phone that sets out to make getting your information to you simpler, safer and intuitively is very attractive to more people than not. You agree yes?"Some people actually like the "Metro" UI but they don't want to be locked down on Windows Phone. For example, if you are a heavy Google Apps user then Windows Phone will be a big paperweight for you. There are some third party apps to help in some regards there but quality is an issue."You are speaking to Ecosystems now. This thinking is the same reason why many iOS lovers can't imagine themselves leaving the iPhone regardless of how much work (customization/maintenance)YOU can do with an Android device. They are so hooked into the Apple ecosystem, for them to switch would be life altering. I give you credit though. At least you tried the WP launcher..lol! Mind you, if you get an Android but you are a hard core user of Windows services, you will run into similar road blocs as well and may relegate your Android device to "brick" status as well."For Music, Windows Phone gives us Zune which never got more than a 2% Market Share and Xbox Live for Gaming. Both of which require hefty fees for use. I still to this day do not understand why Zune costs more than even the best of Streaming alternatives and yet it has never gone over 2% so the price is absurd."Hmmm.. What does market share have to do with personal use and overall experience? If we go by market share alone, McDonald's would sell the best quality food around or at least some might believe this to be true. Billions of people love McDonald's but you know you can't go by numbers alone right? What I love about Zune is not only do I get unlimited streaming for the price but I also get 10 free songs a month. The killer is how beautiful it looks, how it's seamlessly integrated into the OS it is. No fuss, no hassles, lag, freezing etc.. You know what I'm talking about right?? Also, I don't have to worry about downloading all of my music onto my phone in order to hear it whenever I want. Now that rocks if you ask me and all without having to go out into a virus free marketplace and look for it.Lastly, as far as molding an OS and openess (that word again) goes, some people (such as yourself who "live" on their phones) may have a need to tweak and tinker because you obviously have the time and/or willingness to do so but for a lot of us, it's all about the data bro. I want my information with as little fuss and setup as possible. I get off on how simple it is for me to stay connected in a unified, connected and simplistic environment. I want an OS that thinks ahead (like a good assistant) so I don't have to think for it. I'm too busy with things other than what color my phone is, what programs are running in the background, which programs I have to kill or what ROM I need to install in order for this to work right. I want a Mercedes Benz experience and not a hotrod weekend project car experience. Yes the hotrod may be able to run laps around my Benz but it's not how fast or how powerful your car is but the overall quality of the trip more times than not.Yeah Yeah.. I know, I know. With an Android I can do this and I can do that but for the typical WP user we love to ask what a phone can do for us as opposed to doing all of the work ourselves in the name of customization and "openess" (I just love that non word).
  • MrWet, thanks for the response. You have a lot of valid points as well.When I mention "Windows" in terms of Malware, I'm talking about Windows for the Desktop, not Windows Phone. Windows Phone as a platform hasn't gotten popular enough yet to attract attention from malware/virus authors. I'm not sure if that attraction would be a good or bad indicator :-)I totally agree with you about the problem with an "open" Market. Apple does some rather stringent testing of Apps before they will bless them and release to their App Store. They even disassemble the Apps to run through their code just to make sure, however, we've seen that sometimes they aren't as thorough as they should be as a "FREE Tethering" option was hidden in one popular app a while back that somehow got missed.Google needs to be a little more proactive. They decided to go the opposite way of Apple. Rather than doing intensive testing of App Submissions they just leave it up to the developer. That is a huge mistake. While I personally feel that Google will address this, it is something they should have already done. Users should have to install third party Security Apps to protect their phone.While I'm glad their are third parties out there looking out for us I do believe Google should be all over this.Having spent some time on the Android platform, using 2 different phones and the Google TV, I can honestly say that while I enjoy the ability to customize, part of me just wants the phone to work and not require tweaking. I plan on moving back to iPhone for a while but even when I get there I will Jailbreak my phone so that I can customize some. I never did when I was on iOS before but I will now.With that said though, if I were to recommend a smartphone to someone today I would have to size them up to determine what was best for them.For the tech geek type that likes to customize their desktop OS or typical Linux types, I'd send them in the direction of Android.For average users that want to browse the web, check email, play and occasional game and post to Facebook I'd have to dig deeper. What Email service do they use? Do they play a lot of Console Games, namely Xbox? Do they own a Zune? These questions might lead me to recommend Windows Phone.On the other hand, if the individual never plays on an Xbox, doesn't already have a Zune and doesn't use Hotmail for their Email Service, I'd recommend iPhone as it would easily fit their needs.I have no problem with recommending Windows Phone. If it is the right fit then it is what should be used. However, if the person told me that they are a Google Apps user and an Xbox addict, I would recommend iPhone as it would be a better fit. The Xbox integration isn't enough to recommend Windows Phone. Yes, it might be nice but if the individual is a heavy Google Apps user then they might get frustrated on Windows Phone where as they would find much better integration on iPhone.To address the "Zune" topic, I just can't see paying $15 a month when I'm currently paying $3 a month for Grooveshark. However, I will point out that Mog, Rdio and Spotify are way better than Grooveshark and I'm thinking about moving to Spotify for $9.99 a month.While some FREE Music each month would be nice, I would rather spend the additional money at Amazon when and if I want to.Other than the steep price of Zune, the one other drawback is the inability to use it outside of the U.S.Maybe that has changed or is changing but I know that has been one of the biggest complaints from people outside of the U.S.As for the Market Share comparison, it might not make sense to look at that but the Zune never topped 1% and eventually Microsoft just pulled the plug. Sure, there is still old stock in the stores but they are focusing on Windows Phone which hasn't topped 1% yet. While it may not seem important on the surface, it's easy to see the importance by simply walking into a crowded subway and asking "who has ever owned an iPod" and then asking "who has ever owned a Zune". I'm sure you will get a lot of responses for the iPod but not many, if any for the Zune. The iPod is synonymous with iPod which is why Zune never became big in the market.As you may or may not have guessed, I'm not your typical Android fan. I think it is great but it could definitely get better.While I know plenty of non-technical people that really love their Android Phones, I know there are still some aspects of Android that could be better. Go ahead Android fanboys but you know it is true. Android is still growing and innovating. I'm not moving back to iOS because I don't like Android, I'm doing so because I haven't had an iPhone since my old 3G and love new toys :-)By the way, I'm looking forward to getting the Honeycomb update on my Google TV and will still enjoy my Android Phone for many other things once I get the new iPhone 5 :-)**EDIT**I failed to speak to the "ecosystem" discussion. This is a very tough one to get around. Buying Apps for a Mobile Platform is a sort of "investment". I know when I considered moving from iOS to Android I thought about that one long and hard. That's a lot of money to toss out the window with a move to a new ecosystem. I also worried "would I be able to find the same or similar apps". All valid points. In the end I went ahead and moved and you know what, I was easily able to get the same apps I had and some better ones but what shocked me more was how much more I was willing to spend on Apps on Android. I was a $0.99 to $3.99 guy on iPhone but I've easily spent $8 on Apps on Android. You have to pay for quality. I don't even want to add up totals for everything. That would be scary :-)So yes, ecosystems are important. After putting a lot of time and money into one, it is rather difficult if not impossible to contemplate moving to another.For a Microsoft Fan and .NET Developer, it is easy to move to Windows Phone because it speaks your language :-)However, I would point out that there are many Windows Phone guys out there that still use their iPhone because the Apps just aren't there... ahem, Hanselman :-)Moving platforms shouldn't be as scary as it is for some but yes, it is an investment in both time, knowledge and money.
  • Thanks for your thoughtful response Kdarty. " When I mention "Windows" in terms of Malware, I'm talking about Windows for the Desktop, not Windows Phone. Windows Phone as a platform hasn't gotten popular enough yet to attract attention from malware/virus authors. I'm not sure if that attraction would be a good or bad indicator :-)"Hmmmm, comparing Windows desktop and Android is interesting but I can see why you did. I remember when MS was getting murdered for trying to make a desktop OS act like a mobile OS. Fast forward and here we have Android suffering from similar problems that Windows XP used to have:1) Freezing2) Viruses3) Laggy4) Fragmented5) Always felt thrown together when compared to Apple OS6)CrashingThe funny thing is many people who used to hammer MS for their desktop performance are perfectly happy with Android. What I find hard to understand is how can we be OK with our mobile devices under performing in the ways mentioned above but have a fit when our desktop performs in such a way? Strange to me. Especially since mobile is supposed to be so personal and reflective of who we are as individuals. In regards to your reasoning to why WP doesn't have malware yet (not enough units sold), using your logic, the iPhone should be loaded with malware as well. Do you agree? Earlier you addressed why Apple hasn't had to deal with malware and viruses but you chose to ignore the fact that MS since 2010 has already had anti malware plan in place.:https://www.pcworld.com/article/209969/windows_phone_7_apps_battle_malwa...Sales or lack thereof, the reason why Apple and WP don't have malware problems is more likely because they have a filtering plan in place and Android doesn't. There are more facts that support this thinking than the idea of not having enough market share or sales to even warrant malware attacks. Is it possible WP isn't popular enough to warrant such attacks. Yes it's possible but the facts tell it all. Android Market Place is battling malware because no one is guarding the hen house."For average users that want to browse the web, check email, play and occasional game and post to Facebook I'd have to dig deeper. What Email service do they use? Do they play a lot of Console Games, namely Xbox? Do they own a Zune? These questions might lead me to recommend Windows Phone."WP seems more like the phone for your dad regardless if he plays games or not. With email, the fonts are huge! The UI is simple and organized, very little learning curve. No lagging, freezing, app killing, user maintenance for him to worry about. Sounds like a slam dunk to me. Then again, you know your dad better than I so what do I know? "To address the "Zune" topic, I just can't see paying $15 a month when I'm currently paying $3 a month for Grooveshark. However, I will point out that Mog, Rdio and Spotify are way better than Grooveshark and I'm thinking about moving to Spotify for $9.99 a month."I can understand your reluctance to pay $15 a month for any service but if you did have to pay $15 for a program, Zune is one I'd recommend. Actually, Zune is not a music streaming service only. It really is a place where all media (besides photos) reside. Video, Podcasts, Radio and Music all reside in the Zune hub. Now think about that for a second. No multiple apps to load to handle all of the above features. It's all right there in one place. Now you may find a 3rd party app that performs some aspects of it's feature set "better" than a built in Zune feature may perform the same job but I think having the built in feature out the box and the choice (Holy **** I said the word choice in the same sentence as WP! ;-) ) if I want to download a 3rd party app later is priceless!"As for the Market Share comparison, it might not make sense to look at that but the Zune never topped 1% and eventually Microsoft just pulled the plug. Sure, there is still old stock in the stores but they are focusing on Windows Phone which hasn't topped 1% yet. While it may not seem important on the surface, it's easy to see the importance by simply walking into a crowded subway and asking "who has ever owned an iPod" and then asking "who has ever owned a Zune". I'm sure you will get a lot of responses for the iPod but not many, if any for the Zune."Firstly, I can't speak for anyone else and definitely not people on a crowded train. However, I can speak for myself and when I have my music playing on my HTC Arrive and I'm getting my Mango multi-tasking on, I'm really not thinking about market shares. When I'm with a lady friend and I'm handling my business, I really don't care how she rates appearance wise according to national statistics based on marketing data. When I'm handling my business I'm in the zone! Just like when I'm zoning out listening to my music on my Arrive, made by HTC, pimped by Sprint and brought to you by Microsoft. "However, I would point out that there are many Windows Phone guys out there that still use their iPhone because the Apps just aren't there... ahem, Hanselman :-)"And rightly so! Apple has a ton of apps and hardware support industry wide and WP is not there yet. However, I can only address this factually if I speak for myself and I can honestly say there is not one app that I feel I'm missing while using my WP device. Saying that, I'm not an app junky so my position kinda speaks for itself. If we're speaking generally, how many apps do you think the average user downloads and how many use these apps more than once? I found a few links about this very subject but I will post one that made for an interesting read. Check out the link below:http://www.localytics.com/blog/2011/first-impressions-matter-26-percent-...
  • The "electronista" press was all excited about the announcement of the Galaxy II S - or whatever it is. Some even called it "the phone Apple knew would come some day."Honestly, I look at the home screen in the shots of the Galaxy and what do I see? Clock, little buttons to do things and a lot of wasted space that owners will fill with launching buttons and **** app icons. Sooo 2005!In this century, with a Windows Phone, you can just look at your phone and get good information. No need to point, press and wait.
  • Android has Widgets and lots of them. They've had them for quite a long time now. On Windows Phone you call them "Live Tiles". At a glance Widgets give you the information you want without launching different apps just to check things out. They are very popular on Android and Samsung has some really cool ones on their phones as well.Nokia recently updated their Symbian to look pretty much identical to Android and it has Widgets as well.It's obvious that Widgets are a useful UI feature. Android, Bada, Symbian and Windows Phone use them. It's good to see that even if they are different that they all agree that "at a glance" features are useful.Now if only Apple would wake up to that realization :-)
  • There is a paradigm shift coming in mobile devices and some have the ability to see it but don't want to admit it. Some see it and recognize that vision, integration and simplicity is at the very core of technology on a mass level. MS may not be the one's who benefit most from this paradigm shift in the long run but what they've done so far from a technological standpoint has put the industry on notice. This is not about a particular device but more about the ecosystems and the services each OS offers. Customization and choice is cool but in the information age, the key word is still information and the quality and ease in which you obtain that information is priceless. Don't believe me? Ask Google how they made their money and why the hardware is secondary to them and then look at what a WP device focuses on first and foremost.
  • Wow!What an honor to have landed over here on WPCentral. Thanks for all the comments on my Android homescreen, glad to see people liked it and didn't like it.I'm not here to troll or bad mouth WP7. Matter of fact I like the look of WP7 that's why I setup my Android the way I did. There are just a few other things that I like better about Android. And that's why I don't get a WP7. It's just a personal thing. I do apologize if anyone thought I was mocking WP7 or trying to be a troll. I really didn't think this homescreen would have gotten the attention it did. Personally I love it. I'm still using it now and I change Launchers and homescreens like I change underwear. Sure it probably doesn't have all the functionality WP7 does, but I just like the look. So much respect to the WP7 peeps. Thanks for looking at my work too. :-) Mortem Tuam
  • Thanks Mortem Tuam for swinging by. Hope the banter wasn't too rough and as the editor of this site, appreciate sharing your thoughts. Good luck on the project.
  • @Daniel RubinoNo worries man. I get it, the banter wasn't anything new, people love what they love and they defend it to the core. Myself. I came from iOS and I still love iOS but I don't like that you can't do much customizing to iOS, so I moved to Android. As far as WP7 goes. Beautiful UI lovely font. But the apps are just not there for me (personal thing). If WP7 works for someone then I say....use it and love it!If Android works for someone.....use it and love it!If iOS works for someone....use it and love it!It's great to see support and passion coming from users of these OS's....the variety helps innovation and competition. But honestly, we should draw the line somewhere and learn to at least respect each other as human beings. We may not like each others operating systems of choice. But I sure don't hate you as a human being.PeaceMortem Tuam
  • Thanks for stopping by Mortem. Have you used a WP device yet?
  • @MrWetThanks for having me here ;)I have not played with a WP7 device yet. I guess I am making my choice to stick with Android based on the App stores. From what I can see the Android Market has more of a selection than WP7....although the Android Market was what made me almost NOT go Android. Apple's App store has far more apps and I loved that about iPhone. If WP7 gets more apps then I may be tempted to try one out. Quick question. Does WP7 allow you to change tiles using your own custom images? That's one of the things I liked about Launcher 7 Pro...all the tiles on my setup are made by me. Now some don't like the tiles because they believe they do not relate to the app they represent. I can agree with them to a point. I made those tiles to my own taste. If I had been marketing this for the masses, I would have used a whole different train of thought. At any rate, I am getting long winded here. I would love to try a WP7 device. Unfortunatly at the moment. I'm broke! LOL and looking for a new job :-)RegardsMortem Tuam
  • Sorry to hear about the employment situation Mortem. "Now some don't like the tiles because they believe they do not relate to the app they represent."In regards to having your own photos on the tiles, I don't think so. The reason why I say this is I believe the live tile photos are controlled by the developer of the app. I could be wrong but that is my understanding at this point. With that being said, I have never had a live tile that didn't relate to the app it represented. That sounds strange but anything is possible right?
  • Thanks for the response MrWetWell if I can't make my own tiles for a real WP7 then I don't think I would buy one. I'm not a fan of the solid color ones with white icons or black icons....I like to personalize the tile to how I feel and what I think should be on it. Maybe if WP7 offered the ability to use your own images then I might try one. Thanks everyone for your time. MT