Skip to main content

Dell Latitude 7389 2-in-1 review: An all-business PC with a bit of style

There's nothing overly flashy here — but Dell's Latitude 7389 is a serious 2-in-1 for you working types.

The Dell Latitude 7389 is certainly not trying to impress anyone with thinness, though it's far from fat, too. And the black soft-touch finish almost seems like it's trying to blend in. And that's the quick and dirty story of the Latitude 7389. It's not here to impress anyone. It's here to get down to business.

Let's take a look.

Serious business

Dell Latitude 7389 2-in-1

Dell Latitude 7389

See at Dell

Starts at $1,641.43

Bottom Line: There's nothing overly flashy about this laptop. It's all about what you're doing with it. You've got some options to chose from, including storage size, PalmRest security, and whether you want a cool pointy pen thingy. (That's the technical name.)

Pros:

  • Solid build with a bevy of options.
  • USB-C charging, plus a couple USB 3.0 ports.
  • Relatively slim design given.
  • Some great accessories.

Cons:

  • Trackpad buttons are subpar.
  • Key travel feels deep and loose.
  • Soft-touch finish is a dust magnet.

What you'll love about the Dell Latitude 7389

There are four major SKUs (that's nerd-speak for models) of the 7389, ranging from an Intel Core i3-powered low end, to Core i7 at the high end. The basic body and display remain the same throughout, as do the available ports. Beyond the processor, you'll have the opportunity to chose between storage options, a thinner display bezel, PalmRest security, chargers, an LTE modem, and whether you want the Active Stylus pen.

Additionally, there is an option for the full HD display with built-in Windows Hello via an IR camera.

CategorySpecs
Form factorTwo-in-one convertible.
Display13.3-inch FHD touch (1080x1920) IPS LED.
ProcessorIntel Core i7-7600U.
RAM16GB.
Storage256GB SSD.
Battery60 Whr.
Size12 in x 8.26 in x 0.46in to 0.70 in
(305 mm x 210 mm x 11.75 mm to 17.85 mm).
Weight3.11 pounds (1.41 kilograms).

Dell sent us the high end of the range to check out. Here are the specs as tested:

This isn't the smallest or lightest 2-in-1 you'll find. But the Latitude 7389 definitely is the sort of thing I'd pull out of my bag in a meeting and mostly not worry about how I might be judged.The base model should get things done, and you can pimp it out to north of $2,000, if you want.

Here's how the whole range breaks down.

Price$1,641$1,927$2,010$2,487
ProcessorCore i3-7100UCore i5-7200UCore i5-7300UCore i7-7600U
RAM4GB8GB8GB16GB
Storage128GB SSD128GB SSD128GB SSD128GB SSD
DisplayFHD touch LCDFHD touch LCDFHD touch LCDFHD touch LCD
GraphicsIntel UHD 620Intel UHD 620Intel UHD 620Intel UHD 620

Note that the prices listed here are what Dell lists before any discounts. At the time of this writing, the starting prices actually range from $1,149 on the low end, to $1,739 for the model we reviewed.

And again, you've got options, including a larger SSD, narrower bezels on the display, with a larger battery, the Active Pen, and the Hybrid Adapter and Power Bank — a $189 USB-C charger that doubles as a portable battery.

If a metal chassis promotes a "premium" feel, the black soft-touch finish on the Latitude could be said to portray a sense of seriousness. It looks good, at least for now. It feels good. And the hinge has just the right amount of resistance as you open the display.

Dell has a range of ports on the Latitude 7389, too. There are a couple of USB 3.0 ports (Type A). There are two USB-C ports for future-proofing, and charging. (Both of the ports can charge the battery.) There's a microSD card reader tucked in there, too.

Converting to tablet mode is easy enough, too. Just keep on folding back the display. You end up with a slab about twice as thick as what you'd usually consider to be a tablet.

Image 1 of 5

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 2 of 5

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 3 of 5

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 4 of 5

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 5 of 5

Dell Latitude 7389

What you'll loathe about the Dell Latitude 7389

The trackpad and buttons are the biggest sore spots for me. While I can get used to split left- and right-click buttons easily enough, the buttons themselves are just too loose and have more travel than I want. It takes what otherwise is a pretty solid experience and spoils it somewhat.The keys share a little bit of this gripe, too, though I'm a little more lenient on that because they require less accuracy. Just pound on the things that make the letters, and letters appear.

How about the trackpad? That's just a disappointment.

I'll quibble a little with the resolution of the display, too. While 1080 x 1920 is just fine — definitely good enough if you're going to be using this machine for close-in presentations — I'd love to see an option for a higher res. It'd give the Latitude 7389 a leg up, particularly if you're going to be using it for any sort of creative work.

And as much as I love the look and feel of the soft-touch finish, I'm worried about its longevity. At the very least (and as you can clearly see in the pictures here) it's a dust magnet. That's not the sort of thing that inspires confidence in a client, and it's going to make the 7389 look aged before its time.

Image 1 of 3

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 2 of 3

Dell Latitude 7389

Image 3 of 3

Dell Latitude 7389

Bottom line on the Dell Latitude 7389

This is a serious 2-in-1. It has the internals to keep up with pretty much anything you'd want to be doing for business. It has looks that don't detract from the overall experience. And it has options to fill most any need.

Dell also slipped us the Active Stylus Pen, which is a nice little accessory ($50). If you need to do markup on a consistent basis, it's worth the money. Same goes for the Hybrid adapter. As long as you're already charging over USB-C, having a mobile battery for a little extra juice on the go is a really smart idea. (And you can use it to charge your phone.)

This is a lot of hardware, for a not-so-trivial amount of money. But with the Dell Latitude 7389, you get what you pay for.

See at Dell

Phil is the father of two beautiful girls and is the Dad behind Modern Dad. Before that he spent seven years at the helm of Android Central. Before that he spent a decade in a newsroom of a two-time Pulitzer Prize-finalist newspaper. Before that — well, we don't talk much about those days. Subscribe to the Modern Dad newsletter!

7 Comments
  • More than $1600 for the Core i3 and 4GB of RAM version?!?!? Dell must have lost their minds!
  • I'm guessing you're not familiar with business and enterprise level laptops, which have batteries rated and supported for many more years, use higher quality/more durable parts, and offer better support to businesses. They also generally offer bulk discounts when bought in quantity. If you approach buying a business laptop from a consumer perspective, you're going to have to step into a new world of jargon, smart card support, vPRO and more. It's not the same tech.
  • I understand. I was looking at this from a consumers perspective.
  • I use one of these at work and it does have windows Hello via cameras.  Nice setup the stylus is quite accurate also.
  • Yup, noted the correction.
  • I'm not a big fan of the design, it look very massive...
    I just purchased an HP Elitebook x360 1030G2 (coming from a 2014 Dell XPS 15).
    What surprises me is that the storage is limited to 128Gb SSD? No option for 256,512,...?
  • We got a test one at work and it is a very nice machine.  I am hoping to snag it after testing :)