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Google Stadia game streaming supports the Xbox Adaptive Controller

Today, Google unveiled its gaming streaming service called "Stadia." While a lot of details like how much it'll cost or what games will be priced at weren't announced, the company did say that the Xbox Adaptive Controller will work with the service. It's great to see that Google is supporting it right off the bat.

Many months ago, Microsoft unveiled the Xbox Adaptive Controller for gamers with disabilities. According to the company, the accessory allows various different peripherals to attach to its numerous ports, providing options for those who have limited mobility. On top of the controller lie two large programmable buttons, alongside quick access to the "Xbox," "Menu," "View," and other key inputs. What makes this controller truly unique is along the rear. There are nineteen 3.5 mm jacks, hooking the console into an existing ecosystem of accessible buttons and other input devices.

Stadia Info

Stadia Info (Image credit: Android Central)

The Xbox Adaptive Controller is a tangible example of Microsoft's company-wide efforts, and they'll hopefully encourage other companies to follow suit. Gaming is truly the great unifier, bringing together people from all over the world to share in mutual joy, and Microsoft and its partners are trying to make sure nobody gets left behind.

Check out our hands-on with the controller

The Xbox Adaptive Controller is available on the Microsoft Store for $100.

Asher Madan handles gaming news for Windows Central. Before joining Windows Central in 2017, Asher worked for a number of different gaming outlets. He has a background in medical science and is passionate about all forms of entertainment, cooking, and antiquing.

3 Comments
  • Commandeering a common Microsoft product to be used solely with a Google service isn't quite what I would be called supporting. Microsoft has no ties to that beyond the hardware that is being subverted.
  • They're only doing this because Microsoft has a leg up in gaming. Supporting it helps Google get its feet in. They don't wanna support Microsoft when it's something like UWP because they can frustrate Microsoft users that way. They have a leg up with Chrome and have no need for native support.
  • Makes business sense. Why invest in R&D for a similar product when it already exists and support is relatively easy to implement. More consumers, more business.