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How to change keyboard layout on Windows 10

Windows 10 change keyboard layout
Windows 10 change keyboard layout (Image credit: Windows Central)

Windows 10 prompts you to configure additional keyboard layouts during the initial setup. However, you can always add or remove layouts at any time if you didn't choose the correct one or you have to type in another language.

Typically, it's uncommon to change the input settings, but there many situations when you might need to. For instance, sometimes you may need to switch to the Spanish layout to write words that include special characters like "Ñ," or prefer a different layout, such as the United States-Dvorak.

Regardless of the reason, Windows 10 ships with easy settings to add, remove, and change layouts for hardware and touch keyboards.

In this Windows 10 guide, we will walk you through the steps to add, change, and remove keyboard layouts in your current setup.

How to add keyboard layout on Windows 10

To add a new keyboard layout on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Time & Language.
  3. Click on Language.
  4. Under the "Preferred languages" section, select the current default language (top in the list).
  5. Click the Options button.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Under the "Keyboards" section, click the Add a keyboard button.
  2. Select the new keyboard layout to add to Windows 10.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Repeat steps 6 and 7 to add more layouts.

Once you complete the steps, the new keyboard layout will be added to the device, and you can switch between them using the instructions below.

How to change keyboard layout on Windows 10

While changing layouts is straightforward, it'll reconfigure some of the keyboard keys, which means some of the keys may print a different character depending on the layout.

To switch between keyboard layouts on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Click the Input Indicator icon in Taskbar (bottom right).
  2. Select the new keyboard layout.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to switch back to the default layout.

After you complete the steps, you can start typing with the new keyboard layout.

Enable Input Indicator

If the Input Indicator is not present in the Taskbar, you can enable it through the Settings app.

To enable the Input Indicator on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Personalization.
  3. Click on Taskbar.
  4. Under the "Notification area" section, click the Turn system icons on or off option.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Turn on the Input Indicator toggle switch.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

Once you complete the steps, the icon will appear in the notification area of the Taskbar to access the layouts and switch between them. Alternatively, you can also use the Windows key + Spacebar keyboard shortcut to cycle between the available keyboard layouts more quickly.

How to remove keyboard layout on Windows 10

To remove a keyboard layout on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Time & Language.
  3. Click on Language.
  4. Under the "Preferred languages" section, select the current default language (top in the list).
  5. Click the Options button.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Under the "Keyboards" section, select the keyboard to remove from the list.
  2. Click the Remove button.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Repeat steps 6 and 7 to remove additional layouts.

Once you complete the steps, the keyboard layout will be removed from the device.

More Windows resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10 and Windows 11, visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

15 Comments
  • 很好!Ah ha! It works!
  • anyone know how to enable windows search control with keybaord in tablet mode? Is not working in build 14372.
  • The 'United States English - International" keyboard layout is missing the "¿" character. There, I said it.
  • Tapping the links within the app prompts me to search for an app in the store to handle it. What's up with that?
  • I just wanted to know why Windows syncs keyboard layouts across different computer along with language settings. I have to disable the sync because my computers have different physical layouts even when using the same language... that's a stupid thing to assume the physical layouts to be syncable
  • They sync as part of the "Language preferences", you can enable sync but avoid the languages and keyboard layouts by just disabling that option (in Settings > Accounts > Sync your settings).
    It is ok to allow these to sync, since some people do want to sync their keyboard layouts even if the physical layout doesn't match. Windows organizes keyboards as part of each language you want to type in, this makes sense if you want for example to type English using the QWERTY US layout but use the AZERTY layout to type in French on the same keyboard.
    What's really missing, is the ability to set an "automatic" layout for each language, saying "for this language, match the layout of the physical keyboard instead of a software-specified layout".
    This would make it possible to keep your languages list synchronized between computers with different hardware layouts and not force a specific layout that doesn't match the attached keyboard. I am trying to push that idea through the Feedback Hub at https://aka.ms/AA4r2wy
  • For most, maybe sync makes sense?
    I have Alienwares and Surfaces and I use my own KB wz Alienwares because I'm a gamer.
    My setting is always the same, for every device (I live in Japan but I prefer my own 101 KB in the office).
  • I have a touch laptop if at all the keyboard can be moved to right and just with my right hand thumb I could swipe to get characters on the screen
  • While this is very helpful for those who need it, it's really old news. 
    Which does not matter of course, if you haven't heard of it before.    What I am wondering is:
    How on earth do I disable the CAPS LOCK key?  I would like to disable it completely (no response whatsoever, 
    or just make the CAPS LOCK key a mundane SHIFT key.  Can anyone refer me to a good hack?  The other thing is that this hack should work with a notebook that has an additional Logitec wireless keyboard. 
    Ideally this hack could be applied to the internal notebook keyboard and the external wireless keyboard as well.  Anyone has a good idea to get rid of the CAPS LOCK key(s)?    Thanks.   
  • i just want to know is there any method to add my desire font as the keyboard input font in windows 10 ? For example; i want to use some font which i use in MS word as the keyboard input font. Any expert advice would be highly appreciated.
  • thanks, it works.....
  • The zoomed circles make your screen shots totally useless - I can't tell what's going on. Further you jump from 'region and language' to 'click on the language you wish to add'.... What do you mean 'click on the language'? Way too vague and unclear.
  • Wow, yet another “new” article with 4 YEAR OLD comments. 🙄 Hint: if you can’t think of a new topic and decide to recycle a 4 YEAR OLD article, maybe you should delete the 4 YEAR OLD comments. Otherwise, you look lazy AND stupid.
  • This keyboard feature is, in many ways, the most annoying part of Windows 10. Why?
    1. The keyboard layout at the *top* of the list decides the default keyboard when re-starting Windows. No problem... perhaps.
    2. Because of point 1 above, if you have a *physical* keyboard attached to the computer, you really want to change the top-most keyboard layout to be the same as your physical keyboard. If not, at start-up, Windows will assume a different layout than the actual layout on your physical keyboard. Problematic if you start typing (e.g., a password) and forget to switch layout to match your physical keyboard layout. No problem... perhaps.
    3. And... now... the totally insanely idiotic part: your installed *apps* from the Microsoft Store uses UI language according to the chosen language of the top-most keyboard, and *not* based on the chosen UI language of Windows. OK... please tell me I'm wrong :-(
  • Why doesn't the transparency effect apply to my onscreen keyboard? 🤔