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How to check your computer uptime on Windows 10

On Windows 10, understanding how long a device has been up and running can be useful information in a number of scenarios. For example, when troubleshooting problems, you may want to know if a reboot was recently applied, or if your computer is acting up while working on an important project, and you suspect a restart is required.

Whatever the reason, Windows 10 doesn't make it obvious to see your system uptime, but it's not impossible to find either, as you can deduce this information using Task Manager, Control Panel, Command Prompt, and PowerShell.

In this Windows 10 guide, we walk you through four simple ways to check your device uptime without involving scripts or restarting.

How to check PC uptime using Task Manager

Perhaps the easiest way to check your device uptime is using Task Manager with these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Task Manager and click the top result to open the experience.Quick Tip: You can also open Task Manager using the Ctrl + Shift + Esc keyboard shortcut, or by right-clicking the taskbar and selecting Task Manager from the menu.
  3. Click the More details button (if you're using the compact view).
  4. Click the Performance tab.
  5. Select the CPU section.

Once you complete these steps, you'll see your device uptime on the right side, at the bottom of the page.

How to check PC uptime using Control Panel

Another easy way to determine your system uptime is to check your network adapter status with these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Control Panel and click the top result to open the experience.
  3. Click on Network and Internet.

  1. Click on Network and Sharing Center.

  1. Click the Change adapter settings option in the left pane.

  1. Double-click the network adapter connected to the internet.

After completing the steps, you can deduce your computer uptime using the "Duration" information, which indicates the uptime from the network connection that resets every time the device starts. (Of course, these methods work as long as you didn't reset your network connection since the last time you booted the device.)

How to check PC uptime using Command Prompt

If you want to use Command Prompt to check your device uptime, you have at least two ways to do it.

Using WMIC

To check your computer uptime using Command Prompt, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and click the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to query the device's last boot time and press Enter:wmic path Win32_OperatingSystem get LastBootUpTime

Once you complete these steps, you'll notice an output that can look intimidating, but it's not difficult to decode so you can understand your device uptime.

For example, the LastBootUpTime 20181219104602.500000-300 can be broken down using the info below.

  • Year: 2018.
  • Month: 12.
  • Day: 19.
  • Hour: 10.
  • Minutes: 46.
  • Seconds: 02.
  • Milliseconds: 500000.
  • GMT: -300 (5 hours ahead of GMT).

This means that the computer has been up and running since December 19, 2018, at 10:46 AM. If you want to be more specific, just subtract the last boot time with the current time to deduce the number of days, hours, and minutes the device has been in operation.

Using System Information

You can also see your system uptime with a more user-friendly format using the System Information tool with these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and click the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to query the device's last boot time and press Enter:systeminfo | find "System Boot Time"

Using the System Information tool, you can quickly find out the last time your system rebooted in an easy-to-read format. Also, like the wmic command, you can subtract the last boot time with the current time to determine the number of days, hours, and minutes the device has been running.

How to check PC uptime using PowerShell

It's also possible to check your device uptime using PowerShell with these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and click the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to query the device uptime and press Enter:(get-date) - (gcim Win32_OperatingSystem).LastBootUpTime

After completing these steps, you'll get the uptime information on a list format with the days, hours, and minutes.

This guide outlines several ways to check your device uptime, but it's important to note that there are many other methods to find the same information using Command Prompt and PowerShell scripts. However, these are the most straightforward methods.

In addition, while these instructions are focused on Windows 10, these methods have been around for a long time, which means they'll also work on Windows 8.1 and Windows 7.

More Windows 10 resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

5 Comments
  • Will this uptime be useful in determining how long laptop has been on battery?
  • I don’t know about the other was, but in Task Manager the uptime keeps increasing after shutdown because the new fastboot method of Windows does a kind of hibernation and doesn’t do a real shutdown. Only a Restart command will reset it, not Shutdown.
  • Turn it off..
  • I did not know it was because of the new fast boot feature. Thanks :)
    Yeah I just restart whenever I need to reset it (like how many days/hours passed before serious error in Windows insider build)
  • Oh... I guess I can uninstall the Aida64 app now, since I only used it to check Windows uptime.
    Thanks 😁