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Intel launches Iris Xe desktop GPUs that are built for business, not gaming

Intel Iris Xe Desktop Graphics Asus
Intel Iris Xe Desktop Graphics Asus (Image credit: Intel)

What you need to know

  • Intel launched its first Iris Xe desktop graphics cards.
  • The GPUs are aimed at small and medium businesses, as well as mainstream users.
  • Intel partnered with ASUS and another company to launch the Iris Xe discrete graphics cards.

Intel hasn't launched a desktop GPU in 20 years, but that changes today with the launch of the Intel Iris Xe desktop graphics cards. Originally code-named the "DG1," the new desktop GPUs are aimed at small and medium businesses, as well as mainstream users. Intel partnered with ASUS and another unnamed partner to launch the Iris Xe discrete desktop graphics cards. The new graphics cards will be part of pre-built systems from Intel's partners.

Similarly to the Intel Iris Xe MAX graphics cards built for notebooks, the Iris Xe desktop GPUs aren't built for gaming. Instead, they aim to deliver improved performance to mainstream desktop PCs.

The GPUs feature three 4K display outputs, support Adaptive Sync, and support Display HDR. The graphics cards also support artificial intelligence capabilities thanks to DP4a deep-learning inference acceleration. The new GPUs from Intel have 80 execution units and 4GB of video memory.

The product page for the Iris Xe desktop GPUs shares more information and provides insight regarding how Intel is positioning these graphics cards.

The product page talks about multi-tasking, high fidelity video calling, phot and video editing, and enjoying 4K UHD entertainment.

Intel's laptop Iris Xe graphics have been impressive so far. Our HP Spectre x360 14 review breaks down how laptop Iris Xe graphics perform. We'll have to wait and see how the desktop family of Iris Xe GPUs do in real-world testing and how they stack up to AMD and NVIDIA's offerings.

Sean Endicott
Sean Endicott

Sean Endicott is the news writer for Windows Central. If it runs Windows, is made by Microsoft, or has anything to do with either, he's on it. Sean's been with Windows Central since 2017 and is also our resident app expert. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com.

3 Comments
  • You can't just go out and buy one or the Xe standalone cards and slap it in anything you want. Intel has stated it will be OEM only, because it REQUIRES specific BIOS additions and support, and that will only be on certain OEM platforms.
  • Even if you could buy one retail, it would probably go out of stock within seconds due to scalpers and scripts lol...
  • They need to build a gpu for engineering work instead of this small and medium business gimmick. Reason why it's not for gaming is because they are 20 years behind and want to hide behind titles