Windows 10

If you have a PC with Windows 7 or 8.1 installed, you should be prepared to see even more "recommendations" to upgrade to Windows 10 for free in the next few months. Microsoft's Windows and Devices head Terry Myerson has outlined some changes the company is making to the upgrade process.

Windows 10

First, Myerson says that the "reserve-upgrade" process for the free Windows 10 update will be reduced:

"In an effort to streamline the process, we will automatically kick off the upgrade process once you have made a reservation. Before the upgrade changes the OS of your device, you will be clearly prompted to choose whether or not to continue. And of course, if you choose to upgrade, then you will have 31 days to roll back to your previous Windows version if you don't love it."

He added that Windows Update in Windows 7 and 8.1 will soon label the Windows 10 download as an "Optional Update" and then in early 2016 that will change once again:

"Early next year, we expect to be re-categorizing Windows 10 as a "Recommended Update". Depending upon your Windows Update settings, this may cause the upgrade process to automatically initiate on your device. Before the upgrade changes the OS of your device, you will be clearly prompted to choose whether or not to continue. And of course, if you choose to upgrade (our recommendation!), then you will have 31 days to roll back to your previous Windows version if you don't love it."

PCs that are on a metered Internet connection will have the option of disabling automatic updates, according to Myerson, but he added that in those cases users should manually check Windows Update on a frequent basis.

For people who want to upgrade their PC offline, Myerson stated:

"Soon, we will update the Media Creation Tool which is used to create DVD ISOs or USB keys, to create a single image capable of upgrading any 32bit or 64 bit, Home or Pro, device. You can use this media to upgrade any number of Genuine PCs, and even do clean installs wherever you have a Windows license."

Finally, people who have a PC that has an unlicensed version of Windows 7 or 8.1 installed won't be left out in terms of upgrading to a fully licensed version of Windows 10, as Microsoft plans to launch an experiment in the US soon:

"We'll offer a one-click opportunity to get Genuine via the Windows Store or by entering an activation code purchased elsewhere. If this turns into a path for most customers to get Genuine, we will expand the experiment. We'd like to welcome as many of these customers as possible to the legitimate Windows ecosystem."

Myerson does point out that anyone who doesn't want to be bothered with getting notifications on Windows 10 update can shut them down via the Settings feature in Windows 7 or 8.1. However, it seems clear that Microsoft wants to get as many Windows 10 installs as they can get, and that may not sit well with people who simply don't want to update yet.

What do you think of Microsoft's changes in Windows 10 upgrades? Let us know in the comments!

Source: Microsoft