Skip to main content

Microsoft's embrace of iOS and Android is not a new mobile strategy

Many have presumed Microsoft's progress with bringing its products to iOS and Android, and its deeper assimilation of those platforms into its ecosystem via Microsoft Graph are a new mobile initiative.

This is particularly true since Microsoft confirmed the end of Windows Mobile and traditional smartphone hardware. I wrote in July 2015 that Microsoft's goal is to infiltrate (with Microsoft apps) and assimilate (with Windows 10 and Windows Companion app) iOS and Android. I stressed the company's ideal outcome was a Microsoft ecosystem that included iOS and Android alongside its first-party mobile platform. If the Windows phone component of that strategy failed, however, Microsoft's iOS and Android investments would remain and emerge as its Plan B on smartphone hardware.

It's not new, it's the remnants of a bold first-party and cross-platform mobile strategy.

Today this is exactly what we're observing. This is not a new mobile strategy but the remnants of a grander first-party and cross-platform mobile ecosystem effort. The failure of "Plan A" removes the "distraction" of Windows 10 Mobile, allowing us to clearly see what's been happening for years: Microsoft's aggressive infiltration and assimilation of iOS and Android.

Microsoft's Phone Companion and cross-platform apps, Windows phone plan B

Expanding Microsoft's brand from the inside out

During Convergence 2015, Microsoft's Chief Marketing Officer, Chris Capossela (opens in new tab), stressed the company's mission to promote the Microsoft brand. In the context of Microsoft's cross-platform efforts, highlighting a distinct Microsoft identity on competing platforms was a strategic shift. Historically, product names took precedence. Microsoft products now more prominently boast Microsoft branding. In bringing high-quality polished products to other platforms, Microsoft ensures a mobile presence and a respected Microsoft-branded experience.

Microsoft brought Office to iOS and Android in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Other Microsoft apps have followed. Windows phone users need only remember their complaints regarding Microsoft's cross-platform investments to see that an all-encompassing mobile strategy has long been at work. Microsoft's strategy was to "convert" rival devices into "Windows phones" as it tried to convert consumers to Windows phones.

Microsoft's smartphone strategy, planting the seeds (apps) of success

Microsoft's CEO Satya Nadella's 2015 best-on-Windows-Microsoft-experience promise (as a counter-balance to its cross-platform efforts) is further evidence that Microsoft's all-in on iOS and Android efforts aren't a new strategy.

Furthermore, Nadella said in a July 2015 email (opens in new tab): "We are moving from a strategy to grow a standalone phone business to a strategy to grow and create a vibrant Windows ecosystem that includes our first-party device family." That vibrant Windows ecosystem also includes Windows 10's embrace of competing platforms.

Assimilating iOS and Android

If Microsoft's cross-platform apps expand its brand from the inside out, Windows 10, Phone Companion app, cloud and Microsoft Graph incorporate iOS and Android into Microsoft's ecosystem from the outside in.

Nearly 90 percent of all PCs run Windows. Thus, most people that use iOS and Android for mobile, use Windows for desktop computing. Microsoft is capitalizing on this by making Windows 10 PCs a hub for mobile experiences.The Windows 10 Phone Companion app ushers iOS and Android into the Windows 10 experience by guiding users to download Microsoft apps to their mobile devices. The synergy between Windows and iOS and Android doesn't end there.

Microsoft's Project Rome supports cross-platform computing.

Microsoft's Project Rome supports cross-platform computing.

Continuing activity between PC and phone via Microsoft Edge on iOS and Android, or receiving text messages on PC, are examples of Microsoft's iOS and Android integration into Windows.

Deeper integration via Microsoft Graph demonstrates how cloud computing and AI (Cortana) mediate experiences from smart speakers to non-Windows smartphones, a car and finally to a PC. Microsoft's ambitious vision is to provide the cloud-based platform for the industries' platforms, apps and services. Sadly, though iOS and Android integration are still on track, a first-party smartphone is no longer part of that vision.

If Microsoft is the platform for everything, does it really need a phone?

Microsoft wants it all

Microsoft's iOS and Android investments and the pursuit of a first-party smartphone platform were never mutually exclusive. Redmond's goal has long been an infiltration and assimilation of iOS and Android and a strong first-party mobile presence supported by Windows 10, AI, an intelligent cloud, and Microsoft Graph.

The apparent shift from a first-party to a cross-platform mobile strategy is more illusion than reality. Look at it this way: A lead singer in a group gets virtually all of the fans attention even though background singers are also on stage. If, however, the lead singer leaves the stage and the background singers continue performing, their presence and voices are more noticeable, though they were performing all along. Windows 10 Mobile's expected demise is making Microsoft's iOS and Android investments more noticeable. That's all.

Redmond plans to reintroduce a first-party component to its cross-platform mobile strategy. It's "Project Andromeda" foldable, mobile device, running Core OS, will be a much less prominent, enterprise-focused and aspirational Windows-on-mobile presence, however. But it will fit alongside iPhone and Android phones in Microsoft's cross-platform mobile strategy.

Microsoft needs to leverage partnerships, eSIM and edge computing to position ultramobile PCs

Jason L Ward is a columnist at Windows Central. He provides unique big picture analysis of the complex world of Microsoft. Jason takes the small clues and gives you an insightful big picture perspective through storytelling that you won't find *anywhere* else. Seriously, this dude thinks outside the box. Follow him on Twitter at @JLTechWord. He's doing the "write" thing!

108 Comments
  • "Microsoft plans to introduce Andromeda..." Unicorn LOL!
  • Why do you say Unicorn, eryker?
    Why do you disagree with that?
    What evidence do you have to support your claim?
  • And, that Android home screen looks like ****.. Looks like nothing. MS could've done better than that.
    It looks like Android! Old school, and boring. What is this? 2006?......... Pathetic.
  • MS could've but didnt
  • Looks like Symbian. I will miss my n8 compared to the look and feel of the latest androids
  • I loved my N8....Nov of 2014 is when I stopped using it....If MS never acquired Nokia...I wonder what would have happened?
  • You obviously do not use android...since you can make it look like ANYTHING you want includeing windows 10 mobile.  so I guess windows 10 mobile looks like ****.   You have no CLUE what you are talking about.
  • Rodney, it's just that we've been burnt too often: Lumia 850, McLaren, Band 3, Surface Mini etc. etc. The litany of canceled devices from Microsoft is long. While there MAY VERY WELL BE a prototype Not-Phone out there in the wild being tested, no one has seen it, ergo, unicorn. I'm happy to (and even need to be) proven wrong, but I don't have much faith in Microsoft these days, especially under this current idiot of a CEO who has destroyed Windows Phone.
  • Fair enough.......
    But, how have you been burned by McLaren? Lol
  • I don't think Nadella is an idiot. He did say he wanted MS to be a service provider. I don't think he wanted WP to die, but seeing it diminish over time meant some choices had to be made.  They chose to cut.  I think they could have marketed better.  Maybe pushed harder in Asia - Nokia had a lot of cred out there.  Get Windows 10, get a discount on a phone (or free like the Lumia 520?) .  They had some cool product placement. Look, I hope they still come back to a phone.  I'd still buy another MS fitness watch.  Without mobile I don't think they will do well...  
  • I´m afraid you´re right. Andromeda exists in the lab for sure. But will it ever be released? Something like new hardware does not fit into Nadella´s strategy at all: For him Microsoft is a service company, not someone who is producing luxury goods. It´s exactly because of these statements why I also think the end of the Surface line is more than just a rumour. I think Nadella is not really interested in the Surface line, and within 2-3 years there won´t be any new Surface models any more. If this should be Nadella´s long-term-strategy, then there is absolutely no reason to introduce a new gadget. If Nadella wants Microsoft to do services only in the long term anyway, then his motivation to create new Hardware is non-existant. You have to face it: There is much going on in the labs of any of the big players. But only a small percent of the prototypes are released. Andromeda could really be a very fascinating toy of the engineers in the lab. But Nadella´s decision what will hit the market in the end is something completely different. And I don´t see much reasons why Nadella should vote in favour of releasing Andromeda in the end. Just some vague statements, but we know how many times Nadella was saying something that was obsolete just a few months later.
  • They need Surface line just like Google need its Nexus / Pixel I think.
  • Why do I keep reading these articles?!?
  • LOL 👍
  • Now Jason Ward claims W10M is dead, or at least that W10M's death is imminent. Most such claims link to one of his previous articles, so I follow the links hoping to find the original source on which the claim is based. ... I never get to an original source, only Jason Ward's own articles, where all paths eventually lead me to opposite claims where he previously stated W10M is not dead... Go figure...
  • Hi a5cent, there are links to Joe Bs statements about the demise of W10M in those pieces. Also my overall argument over time has been two fold. At particular points in time over the years where there were repeated claims that Windows phone was dead, it was not. Even now W10M is not yet dead. The broader and still applicable argument is that Windows-on-Mobile is not dead which is a very clearly articulated theme in my work. I make the point that Microsoft's vision of Windows-on-mobile transitioned through various iterations, Pocket PC, Windows Mobile, Windows Phone, Windows 10 Mobile and next Windows 10 on ARM (Core OS).
  • again Jason is at it with the MSFT is killing phone story.
  • Really, Rohan the title and content strongly suggest this story is about Microsoft's mobile investments in iOS and Android.
  • I dont know too. I'm nearly done. The last month, i ditched skype, switched on 2 of 4 devices to Linux and next could be outlook, because i hate Microsoft adding the same issues again and again to their mail app. Again notifications wont go away, as soon as i mark the mails as read or even delete them. A yeah, groove was killed, i wont start about the app store or cortana, where i cant delete the Knowmail skill for over a half a year now. Did i mention the incredible skype uwp? Im nearly done with all this rubbish. "Cloud first", yeah Satya, because Business customers are consumers, when the come home. And they want to use at work, what they know and are familiar with.
  • I feel as if UWP is the next thing to go. MS has not been putting any effort into their own apps. Still waiting for ton of features to match win32 programs.
  • I have problem with Skype and Microsoft messages on my Alcatel Idols 4s and 950 XL. Usually they fixed it quickly but this time it lasts for more than 10 days.
  • We won't see user engagement anymore, like that of good old days. Microsoft has already lost most of their loyal fanbase, no matter what Windows Central staff says about their site traffic or do to salvage that. Sad but true.
  • Why do you keep reading these articles?
  • Moreover... Why are you even commenting ?
  • Love and hate, man!
  • Phew, hope that Microsoft will not become second or third party company through all ecosystems and loose first party dominancy. Remember, Android started with 0% in mobile business!!! For me I hear from MSFT today just excuses excuses excuses for incompetence and knowledge misguidance, Balmer screamed developers developers developers, what meant users users users.
  • Just make with my new Surface not-Phone already MS, and stop piddling about with consumer facing phones as you stated would be the strategy going forward (but only actually applied to Microsoft device owners, which smarts a bit). This has been in development for so long now that it eclipses many newer MS projects that have reached market already. Heck, people have had children and got to sending them to school since the concept was first put about. If the new not-Phone is supposed to be more focussed, then get with the programme and start focussing on it will you? Time to hire some real marketing people for the latest attempt as well, so best get cracking.
  • A year ago I would have been all in on this to back Panos. But now it is obvious that Nutella's willingness to sink anything resembling a consumer device or product trumps everything else with this company. I think the idiot finally has caught on that i n most cases, this is a day and age where consumers drive a lot of what corporate does. Unfortunately he already stuck it to so many of us that no one is going to believe a word this liar says (and with good cause).
  • Invoke and the new XBox say "hi"
  • Hopefully mid next year we will hear some news regarding these new hardware & software.
  • Yeah, something like: coming soon...
  • So are these dislikes because you guys don't want a new device?
  • Your article is not anything new either. Just keep repeating the same thing in different ways.
  • Thanks for reading🙂
  • So, the next time you see Jason Wards name will you personally be expecting something new,,, once again?
  • Hi tearfalls. Perhaps you should look at the theme of the piece and some of the messaging various publications and outlets have put out since Joe B made his Twitter statements about W10M. Several articles have been published telling readers iOS and Android are Microsoft's NEW mobile strategy. It is that inaccurate and misleading analysis that the title and the content of this piece addresses. My opening statement, and supporting arguments make clear the purpose and direction of this piece. Given the nature of this piece, no NEW information would be required to make the argument to support my thesis. In fact, it is historic (old) information that is best suited to make the argument that Microsoft's investments in iOS and Android are not a new mobile strategy. It draws on past evidence of Microsoft's all in multi-platform investments to put within the context of what we are now observing to prove the inaccuracy of arguments that these cross-platform investments are a new mobile strategy.
  • This strategy gathered steam as soon as Nadella took over, I wonder who is calling it a new strategy???
  • I wonder what Microsoft employees think of Satya. Is he the only one who thinks his plans are working? Because all I see is that his projects in India are the only ones that are working. May that be servers, deals with companies, providing free Wi-Fi throughout a city, etc. It almost seems he is working at Microsoft for India. I wouldn't mind that if he did the same for other countries that deserve no less. Hopefully, it is not a religious thing in his head, just an attachment to his birth place.
  • Considering the large number of MS employees Ol' Nads has sacked, I think we already know what Microsoft employees think of him.
  • From Business Insider: http://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-employees-love-satya-nadella-2016-10
    Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella looks especially good, by the report's reckoning. At the close of 2013, the final days of former chief executive Steve Ballmer's reign, Microsoft only gave a 51% rating for CEO approval. Nadella took the reigns in February 2014, and the CEO approval rating hit 88% by the end of 2015. This year isn't over just yet, but Microsoft is now performing around 10% higher in employee satisfaction than the industry average, says UBS, which edges out Apple.
  • He's an economic terrorist who should be deported. Put an American back in charge.
  • Ahhhh trumpanzee!!!!
  • What's wrong with having an American in place ? You accuse the OP of being a trumpanzee ? You leftists are the real danger.
  • Jason, please stop references from 2015. Satya's cloud first / mobile first strategy may not even exist anymore. I'm sure plans changed within a year.
  • Nope, the wording may have changed but the strategy of marking out consumers as the enemy is very firmly still in place.
  • Hi sholokov, Nadella's focus is cloud first, AI first. I talk about that here: https://www.windowscentral.com/did-microsoft-shift-mobile-first-cloud-fi... The reference to his 2015 statement of building a vibrant Windows ecosystem is relevant. As you know and as this article and others on this site point out, that Windows ecosystem is embracing iOS and Android supported by the cloud, AI and the Microsoft graph.
  • You know the cloud is Ol' Nads focus when you see him shutting down our cloud services. Same as when he was mobile focussed. And I think any form of intelligence was sacked from MS a while back, so that must have been focussed pretty good by now already. Goodbye Groove, you'll be missed. Anither afore ye go...
  • Request for community Please vote for Microsoft to resurrect Project Astoria (ability to run Android apps on Windows mobile devices) on Windows 10 Mobile. Link to vote.
  • WTF didn't this happen?
  • Because it makes UWP pointless. Adopting Android apps won't help. Why would developers pay any attention to UWP when Android apps are compatible? That isn't an option. If you want to run Android apps, buy an Android phone. They will work much better natively.
  • And yet MS have allowed Steam apps in WinMR at the start instead of requiring UWP apps alone. If that's Ol' Nads' strategy then, explain how the approach taken to WinMR fits in?
  • Because Ol' Nads has a strategy, and it doesn't include either you or I.
  • Vote?... MS is a company, not a Democracy... Lol. SMDH🙄
  • Why? The performance of Astoria was rubbish. Also, they're done with mobile anyway. WM10 has like 1/10th of 1% of the market share. Just let it die already.
  • If Microsoft's plan is to release a new mobile device, why are they killing the ecosystem instead of strengthening it?
  • Not sure why, but this is what Ol' Nads always does. The master plan is still operating full steam ahead.
  • Why care? It will be buisiness related only and would you trust them once again?
  • Business is a dead end just as much, if not more than consumer. Apps are much more important when you are trying to get work done that requires them. The chances that Windows will have the mobile app you need is slim to none. Unless you don't need any apps for your mobile device, Windows will not be a good choice for business. They need to target both markets, business and consumer. One or the other won't be enough. This needs to be a two pronged attack, it is too late for anything less.
  • Will there ever be a Microsoft Launcher on IOS? 
  • Lol of course not. But that is on apple.
  • What is a launcher on iOS?
  • Well, I expressed my dislike for Jason's articles once and after a couple of back and forth messages between me and Jason the comment thread was deleted, oh well!!! I'll try to say this as humbly as possible again, nothing new in this editorial again. and by "new" I mean no new idea or something of course the words are new -_- ... the conclusion is pretty much the same we have been hearing for over at least 3-4 months now... you can delete it if you will, lol 
  • I don't and have never deleted any user comments. And if you look at the premise, and title the article,
    "Microsoft's embrace of iOS and Android is not a new mobile strategy" there should have been no expectation of "new" information. What this peice addresses, is the idea that is being pushed in various publications and from various outlets, that Microsoft's aggressive investments in iOS and Android are a NEW mobile strategy. Presenting "new" information to combat that inaccurate analysis is not necessary or relevant. In fact, as I did in this piece going "back" to draw on how these investments have been part of a broad multi-platform mobile strategy are what's effective in making the argument my thesis presents.
  • Well, it was deleted for sure. We can probably go and check. I am sure you didn't delete it but, well, it was deleted.  Sure, if the objective was to counter those narratives, it does a fine job. And its definitely not a new mobile strategy. Even way before the WM 10 had died, MS was clearly pushing its efforts on competing platforms. The core WP users (and the core audience of this site) which also includes me used to ciriticize MS a lot for this push as at times it seemed they were doing more on rival platforms than their own WP/WM. But, here, on this site, doesn't majority already know this stuff?
  • What are you hoping to achieve here?
  • Nitiah, Perhaps some do and perhaps not. Not everyone sees this as clearly. Some have accepted and repeat the inaccurate analysis that iOS and Android are MS new mobile strategy. Because I see that false information being perpetuated as a writer that strives to provide accurate context it was important that I do so in this case as well. Also, I'm glad you're able to see the purpose of the piece and your acknowledgment of its efficacy after I re-explained it here in comments. I'm just curious, how did you miss the objective of the piece as it is clearly stated in the intro and opening paragraphs as seen in the excerpt: "With Windows 10 Mobile's imminent demise, Microsoft's iOS and Android investments are the company's new mobile strategy, right? Wrong.
    Many have presumed Microsoft's progress with bringing its products to iOS and Android, and its deeper assimilation of those platforms into its ecosystem via Microsoft Graph are a new mobile initiative. This is particularly true since Microsoft confirmed the end of Windows Mobile and traditional smartphone hardware. I wrote in July 2015 that Microsoft's goal is to infiltrate (with Microsoft apps) and assimilate (with Windows 10 and Windows Companion app) iOS and Android. I stressed the company's ideal outcome was a Microsoft ecosystem that included iOS and Android alongside its first-party mobile platform. If the Windows phone component of that strategy failed, however, Microsoft's iOS and Android investments would remain and emerge as its Plan B on smartphone hardware.
    It's not new, it's the remnants of a bold first-party and cross-platform mobile strategy.
    Today this is exactly what we're observing. This is not a new mobile strategy but the remnants of a grander first-party and cross-platform mobile ecosystem effort. The failure of "Plan A" removes the "distraction" of Windows 10 Mobile, allowing us to clearly see what's been happening for years: Microsoft's aggressive infiltration and assimilation of iOS and Android."
  • As a reader, and that's probably just me, I won't want to read articles dealing with similar theme again and again. As you said, the purpose was to bust the false news that's going on around about MS's commitment towards iOS and android, I understand, I don't condone but understand. But my doubt on the quality of post is based on two factors; most of the people coming here already know that and this idea or theme has been repeated quite several times not just by you but by other writers as well. I am not sure, how many of our daily visitors are not aware of this idea, I think a lot of us are. Sure, when the article is shared outside windows central's core audience and goes around web and some random tech enthusiast who doesn't follow MS that much reads it, it might clear a couple of things for him/her but I, again personal opinion, do not expect an "editorial" only for busting a false idea that someone who is not even the core audience is having. Anyone who has that notion that MS is too committed to iOS and android and this is new idea will probably figure out that this isn't the case by reading other articles coming out on this site which in hindsight always clear these kinds of things up. And hey, probably I am wrong in assuming that lot of people are aware of it. In which case, article does justice but if comments on the article be the judge, probably I am closer to right understanding than your reasoning for this article. 
  • Actually many of the comments don't even address the core of the thesis of the piece. Many are reactive to the last three sentences of the piece. Which is where you find the ONLY mention of a next generation mobile device. : "Redmond plans to reintroduce a first-party component to its cross-platform mobile strategy. It's "Project Andromeda" foldable, mobile device, running Core OS, will be a much less prominent, enterprise-focused and aspirational Windows-on-mobile presence, however. But it will fit alongside iPhone and Android phones in Microsoft's cross-platform mobile strategy." I wonder how different the comments would have read had I omitted those last three sentences and the article ended with the preceding paragraph, like this: "The apparent shift from a first-party to a cross-platform mobile strategy is more illusion than reality. Look at it this way: A lead singer in a group gets virtually all of the fans attention even though background singers are also on stage. If, however, the lead singer leaves the stage and the background singers continue performing, their presence and voices are more noticeable, though they were performing all along. Windows 10 Mobile's expected demise is making Microsoft's iOS and Android investments more noticeable. That's all." Just as you admitted to missing the purpose of the piece which was clearly laid out in the beginning, many others likely skimmed(not saying you skimmed, but based on our analytics its clear that many do and are not reading entire posts), read the last paragraph, reached a false conclusion and commented on what they THOUGHT the piece was saying rather than what its actually saying.
  • You said: "I don't expect an "editorial" only for busting a false idea that someone that's not even the core audience is having."
    To your point of the validity of my addressing this concern.. The core audience is being fed the inaccurate view that Microsoft's investments in iOS and Android are its new mobile strategy from sources they are inclined to believe. Hoping someone just figures it out indirectly by reading just another piece, as you suggest, doesn't definitively address the confusion that type of analysis introduces into an already "turbulent" space. A direct message as I bring here, is clear in purpose and direct in execution. Unfortunately, as our discourse shows not even a piece which opens with a very clearly stated statement of purpose and opening paragraph expounding on the purpose of the piece, a body of content supporting the thesis, and a conclusion that wraps it all up, will be understood by readers who don't come to the work with a mindset to thoroughly and thoughtfully read it, without a biased view of its purpose obstructing ones understanding of it. What you see in comments in many cases is what we see in your above comment, an initial inaccurate/biased presumption of the purpose of the piece. In a rare show of humility here however,you humbly concede your error after I addressed it. There are many commenters who have not read the peice in its entirety, or skimmed it, and have unfortunately missed the point of the helpful clarity this piece is meant to provide as well, and are adding inaccurate commentary while also feeding off of the comments of others in a similar boat.
  • In my view, I think people just have heard similar information again and again and hence say these things. I accepted your argument of it being a piece to clarify some issues, however I don't think my initial comment is wrong though. And I have backed up that comment in my later comments with two reasons which I feel are the issues with this article coz I honestly do feel that people already know this stuff specially people who are regular here. Another thing, I want to mention is, I sense some hostility from authors towards commenters on windows central these days and its unrelated to just this post, its in general. Now, before you become angry with it, hear me out. I like how people like Dan and you come out in comment section and debunk the wrong ideas people have or just go against people who are plainly commenting **** but in this process sometimes you guys just "assume" that all of them are trolls. My point here is, majority of audience on windows central consists of MS fans and even in that, good chunk are(were) windows phone users and this is open that wp users were not treated very well by MS, so naturally these people are angry. When they see any article or anything related to windows phone/mobile coming out, they display their anger in comment section coz it is one of the few places where they have built sort of a community and now instead of taking it as anger, sometimes I see authors just giving it back to them you know like "yeah you know just move on" or "yeah why don't you just understand that people have moved on" and stuff. Its a tricky situation though, MS has put us in it. I really appreciate when you guys come in comment section and talk to commenters, its really good. I really do like it. Top reason I come here more often than say onmsft, thurrot, mspu or any site. Unlike Microsoft, at least you guys come out in open, talk, debate and clarify thigns with your customers(readers). lol I am not sure if I conveyed my thought clearly, I am not the writer lol, you are. So I hope you understand my point. 👍👍
  • ffs another 'wardotorial', soon to be contradicted by a joe belfiore tweet, then followed up by another warditorial implying that the contradicted-view from belfiore is what was meant all along and is part of some amazing grand plan.   bottom line appears to be this re. the consumer: microsoft research is pretty much spot on - all the cool stuff in the labs would probably make great consumer devices. Kin/Courier/Hololens/Kinect (if executed correctly).   unfortunately timing, execution (if it gets that far - see courier!), product and marketing all miss the mark.   mark my words we will see this get repeated soon enough. Hololens was an amazing piece of kit - there were some great demos (the 1st unveiling, project x-ray, all the productivity stuff), but the hardware doesn't yet feel like it's leading by example from a consumer perspective.   i'm quite sure apple, google or someone else will come out with an AR headset with a much bigger, more vivid flexible field of view for the holograms themselves, some actual useful first party apps for the everyday joe (not everyone is an architect, gamer etc), and a genuinely useful launcher.   All of the above will kill hololens in one shot. kipman's cliffhouse will look stupid, like microsoft bob once did.   In the meanwhile, UWP is dieing because there is no compelling use case for these types of app on the MS ecosystem. Example - there are a bunch of services these days where signup is only possible thru an app, and the web interface is an afterthought.   that is the way we're headed. sad really but microsoft seems headed in that direction.
  • Hi slip5 can you explain how my ongoing analysis that Windows 10 Mobile would be replaced by Windows 10 on ARM (as previous versions of Windows on mobile, Pocket PC, Windows Mobile, Window Phone were replaced by succeeding OSes) on non-smartphone hardware was CONTRADICTED by Joe Bs statement that Windows Mobile is being put to rest and MS is done with smartphone hardware. Sounds more like confirmation of what I've said rather than contradiction🤔.
    Even his EARLIER tweet that everyone got worked up about, "We have Windows Mobile for the phone experience," as I wrote is consistent with, not contradicted by, this analysis.
    I said then and repeat now, Joe B was specific to say W10M was for the PHONE experiences.
    The next MS device as WC and others have been reporting won't be a phone. So W10M's demise and MS SMARTPHONE efforts all flow with what I've been saying and are consistent with Joe Bs words.😉
    Here's a quick link to my work. www.windowscentral.com/author/jason-ward
  • Sure, I remember how well any mobile strategy has worked for Microsoft over the years
  • Windows Mobile was a success.. It got outdated quickly as iDroid came along, but it was the thing for years before that... That same thing will happen with iDroid, and when that happens with iDroid iDroid will still have been a success. Nothing good last forever, and iDroids fall (not anytime soon) is imminent, as something else better will come along.. This is what we should be hoping for... My Samsung Blackjack running WinMo 5.0-6.5 was no doubt a success of a device. It was the coolest device of it's times.
    .......
    Long story short, you can say "any mobile strategy"... Highly inaccurate
  • So you think this is just the end of Windows? It is inevitable?
  • I suppose you forgot that I don't give a **** about what you have to say, or question?
  • Waaaaahhhhhhh crybaby!
  • Still waiting for the WhartonBrooks phone.
  • I hope you are joking.
  • Regarding the lead singer analogy leaving the stage, it's only ever temporary, they always come back as the focus of attention and drive the band (and sales) forwards. If they don't, the band (usually) folds and the fans have to look elsewhere for their entertainment, in this case Android and Apple.
  • Nutella himself said he was against WM in 2014 when he became head of Microsoft so dont say it was an old strategy. And to prepare for killing WM he instructed to move the apps to IOS and Android. Simply It was not a plan B, Microsoft have no clue what they are doing at the moment.  windows users chose to use Microsoft OS and products when they buy windows PCs. it is not the same thing for Android and IOS users. they already have ecosystem, why should they switch?? they would have done that when WP was still alive.
  • I've seen this coming for a long time, yet still cling to my Lumia Icon, and will as long as I can or until MSFT brings Maps to Android, whichever comes first. You can also Microsoft-ize as you put it an Amzon Fire tablet quite nicely as well.
  • You can already get "maps" on android.  Here maps (which is basically windows maps),  can be had for free....
  • Great article! Excellent point of view through the neon lights of tech industries! It is that kind of vision I praise in Satya, a hard think on overall situation with one foot on today's present and another on a far far future yet to be created! A man with the right tools is brave and fearless on any task and I'm proud of Microsoft's contribute to create those tools! However, I can't stop getting back to my Windows Phone Lumia 640.....that UI, that organization makes me very very happy and confident while I'm using it. I just wished WP10 evolved more in the direction android had!
  • Thanks TheMonarch!
  • MS saved my day. Reading this comment section was once again a blast. 😂 But maybe for a last time. Cant stand/continue reading what evil things Nutella is doing next. Firing all those people was really cruel and its a shame, what 'quality' the MS products became. Just head for the Feedback App, its full of 'Get your stuff together' posts. Whether there is a plan or not, we customers do not take place any more.
  • No worries.  Jason will be back with another one in a week or two.   I admire the consistency, and the tenacity, given the hate and indifference he recieves on each article.  Only other writer out here worth reading is Paul Thurrott.  Only difference between him and Jason, is that Paul himself openly hates on Microsoft right there in the article, whereas Jason is a glass half full type of guy, and the hate is in the comment section.  Still entertaining either way.  
  • What an ugly user interface those small round icons compared to live tiles
  • I agree... Android is cool, but it is so damn old school looking..
    .....
    The funny thing is when Android fans disagree, and it's obvious of what they're used to... "Well, yeah. Of course YOU would like it"... 😂😂😂😂😂
  • That is the dumbest thing I have read all day!   You can make android look like ANYTHING you want.  
  • Actually it looks fine.   Clean and uncluttered.  Windows phones have the ugly UI, with flat square  icons, and some are blinking and flashing.  Too cluttered.  No one buys a phone to stare at the home screen.  It’s just where you go to launch the next app. I realize this idea is lost on the remaining 57 Windows phone users, since there are no apps.   After using iphones and iPads for the last 6 months, the windows phone UI looks really cheesy to me.   Yes, I still have a 1520.   It makes an OK MP3 player, with a 128gb SD card in it.    
  • agreed Naddy.   Home screen is just a "THING" for windows phone users.   You know...because there is nothing else to do on them besides stare at the home screen.   With android and IOS,  at least you have apps to get things done.
  • Under Nadulla, Microsoft will become like that of BBB and HTC. The only name that will keep it afloat will be Xbox.
  • Android again? Jesus Christ. I don't give a **** about Android..
  • Well, WM4eva,  I guess 4EVA is upon us.  10 mobile is dead.   There is nothing annouced as coming soon.  So I think you are SOL.   As an aside,  I just loaded EDGE onto my iphone....WAY better than the safari browser,  and it automatically links with my PC.   Now,  if only MS could get the messaging app to jive with the iphone it would bw great!
  • I'll stick to my dead phone as long as Cortana, onedrive and Bing maps actually work on it and are absolute ***** on android.
  • actually...all three work great on android...so i have no idea what you are talking about....
  • The issue is that this cannablised windows phone sales, they disregarded windows phone by giving ios and android preferential treatment, as result developers did the same. Plus there was no flagship hardware for a long time, when we did get the 950 and 950 XL they were disgustingly buggy for flagship tier products, it took several updates to get upto scratch but by then people moved on. The software was lacking alot of key features suchas tap to pay, due to the initial reliance on carriers via secure sims and then locking that down to the US only. Combined with the cuts to mobile division after Satya Nadella became CEO, windows phone didn't stand a chance. But what i listed here are just a handful of reasons, there have been a mind boggling number of missteps and in trying to avoid them, they repeated them and are still doing so constantly.
  • Microsoft has no mobile strategy - new or old.  Their only strategy is to sell desktop software, or even give it away.  If someone starts selling smart rings to go with smart watches, MS will want to put windows and office on it.  So you can be “productive”. Yawn. When all you have is desktop software, everything tends to look like a desktop pc.  
  • On the whole, the article is correct. Perhaps something interesting is the value Microsoft put on its brand. From the perspective of enterprise computing, productivity software and cloud this is of enormous value. On the other hand in the consumer space exactly the opposite is true. The Microsoft brand has little traction with consumers with many abandoned products that were targetted at their needs. In addition, the tendency Microsoft has of releasing things in the USA only or months and years later in the rest of the world. In mobile, VR, AR and AI Microsoft are not yet in the consumer space. PC gamers are using Oculus headsets for VR, mobile devices for AR experiences and the AI that is really winning in the consumer space is the Amazon Echo. Mobile AR experiences could be seen years ago when Nokia put city lens on the WindowsPhone camera and almost made WindowsPhone an AR pioneer.  The issue I have with Microsoft's "strategy" is that it's OK as far as it goes. In the places, it mapped out as the future of computing, you are seeing other companies pulling ahead in the consumer area. This leaves the Microsoft brand in an enterprise and business silo. Not being in mobile sent us down this route but I am beginning to feel that even putting apps on IOS and Android is not exploiting the technologies that Microsoft have identified as the next wave.
  • Microsoft on Android and iOS is better than Microsoft on Microsoft.  It is what it is. Just a matter of time before Microsoft fully embraces Linux and brings full Office, OneDrive, and OneNote to Ubuntu.   We should just accept that Microsoft is the new Atari and move on.  
  • Google still isn't there on the desktop.  Big news of the day, being able to run Microsoft Office on ANY Chromebook that accepts Android apps.  Okay; but Microsoft never developed proper Office 365 apps for Chrome OS.  They had to run the web version in the browser.  And that remains the workaround, for Chromebook users that cannot run Android apps.  No different than when it was a huge deal that Office 365 was available for the iPad.  Okay, but if you study history, Office was available for the Mac before it came to the PC.  So I'm really not sure why that surprised anyone.   Google's strength is the platform.  It is not the apps.  YouTube app sucks.  Dailymotion is better.  But YouTube excels because of the ecosystem.  Plus YouTube is developing TV shows, Movies, and offers Live TV for $35 a month that includes all of the major networks. Even though YouTube wants to be a network.  Dailymotion cannot compete with that.  Most Google apps suck but people use them because they're free.  At least they are free on the surface; use now pay later, with your data, of course.   Every app Google comes up with, Microsoft has a better app.  But Microsoft lacks the ecosystem.  I'm using Microsoft Launcher right now because it is miles away from Google's launcher. It is what it is.   Even Microsoft had the foresight to include Dropbox integration on their apps because they know that people do not want to pay for their services.  But they can still get a piece of the action if people sign into their Dropbox accounts through their apps.  I can run Linux, install Dropbox, use Microsoft's Dropbox integration within Word online and access my Dropbox files and watch them change on my Linux desktop. If the Office web apps were worth the sacrifice I would uninstall Office 365 on my PC, resubscribe to Dropbox and go all in on this.  Google is not offering this.  The best they can do is give me offline access for Google Docs files through Chrome, and who knows when they will turn off that functionality.  
  • Well isn't this what we wanted?  Windows as a Service.  That is exactly what we are getting under Nadella.  
  • Satya Nadella saved Microsoft, they are already millions of years behind Google and Amazon but slowly making some good moves.
  • Keep lying to yourself
  • please explain Lucktr.
  • Making apps for different phone OSes is a good idea.  But shouldn't they have their OWN mobile platform? What is the killer app MS has no one else does?  None.  People will use apps that are best suited for the ecosystem - and get the best integration.  Chrome on Android, Safari on iOS.  If an MS app gets too popular, you don't think Google will make a getter one for it's platform? Remember how the blocked WP from YouTube....? The world wants mobile....easy mobile...with an easy ecosystem....and it seems like Android has that! Or am I completely off here...? MS - get a phone out there!!!!  WoA....please?
  • I think microsoft's assimilation, with the lead singer annecdote, could be more prominent if microsoft is willing to invest more in the launcher. If they can pull off a windows mobile shell type launcher for android, with live tiles, it could be a win-win situation by getting the best of windows mobile with the best of android, and choice galore in hardware device on the android platform. Both microsoft and android can profit from this symbiosis.